Fantastic Clothing Line Fills a Major Void in the Fashion Industry

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In 2004, while doing custom work for a client who has quadriplegia, fashion designer Izzy Camilleri realized she didn’t know much about the clothing needs of people who use wheelchairs.

“There’s a need and a void for this type of clothing,” Camilleri told The Mighty in an email. The Toronto-based designer began studying and learning what it would take to fill that hole. In 2009, IZ Adaptive Clothing was born. 

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IZ Adaptive Clothing

Camilleri’s line, which can be viewed online, features clothes that are cut to better suit a seated person. Adjustments are also made for people who have difficulty dressing independently. Seams and pocket placement are taken into consideration so clients don’t have to worry about pressure sores developing if they’re usually sitting down.

Most important, the clothes give people who use wheelchairs more options.

“[My clients] now have the freedom to express themselves through their clothes,” Camilleri told The Mighty.

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IZ Adaptive model Joanne. Photo by George Pimentel.

In March, IZ Adaptive Clothing was featured in the Dare to Wear Love gala, a fashion event that raised money for The Stephen Lewis Foundation, an organization working to “turn the tide of HIV/AIDS in Africa,” according to its website.

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