When Alison Chavez was diagnosed with stage 2/3 invasive ductal carcinoma, a form of breast cancer, in July 2013, the first “person” she told was everyone — she made a Facebook status while still on the phone with her doctor. Almost a year later, Facebook is telling Chavez’s story in the poignant video below. The 2-minute clip is proof that “the toughest battles need the best of friends.”

Chavez, 37, finished her last chemotherapy session in January 2014 and continues to share her cancer updates on a Facebook timeline she created. She also acts as a mentor in breast cancer Facebook groups to help newly diagnosed patients learn how to cope.

“It never occurred to me to keep my diagnosis a secret, and I’m so glad that I didn’t,” Chavez wrote in her blog for The Huffington Post. “Cancer became such a huge part of my life; I would have had to hide from the world if I didn’t want anyone to know, and that’s no way to live.”

Watch her story:


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When Teddy Bridgewater was 9 years old, he promised his mom he’d buy her a pink Cadillac Escalade when he became a professional football player. Thirteen years later, he made good on that promise.

The pink color he chose has more significance now, though, because his mother, Rose Murphy, is a breast cancer survivor — Bridgewater, now 21, almost gave up his college football career at the University of Louisville to be by her side. She insisted he continue to play. Now, Spike Lee has documented their journey in a touching seven-minute documentary, “A #Promise2Rose” (below).   You can skip to the 6:30 mark to see the big surprise.

“Your fight, your courage, it all stands out to me,” Bridgewater tells his mom in the video. “And I just thank you for that. Thank you for the many sacrifices that you’ve made for not only me, but for this entire family.”


Bonus: Last week, Bridgewater was a first-round draft pick by the Minnesota Vikings.


Patsy MacDonald never wants to be thought of as a breast cancer survivor. Why? Because she’s a breast cancer badass.

In June 2011, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Today, after a double mastectomy and reconstruction, MacDonald is in remission and on a quest to raise $100,000 for the IWK Health Centre and the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation in less than 60 days. To get the word out, she’s sharing a video (below) of how she responded to her surgery — by getting two beautiful tattoos over the scars on her chest and posing topless for the camera.

“I wasn’t necessarily trying to cover up the scars,” MacDonald says in the video. “I just thought, I want to make them pretty, make this more me.”

Sounds pretty badass to us.



Follow MacDonald’s journey on her Facebook page. If you’re interested in donating to her campaign, head here.


Kayla Wiggins is just 8 years old, but she’s already beaten bone cancer two times. Despite losing both of her legs to the disease, Kayla participated in the 2014 Lilac Bloomsday Run in Spokane, Wash., on Sunday, May 4.

“She inspires me to overcome things that I think are difficult,” Philippa Mayall, Kayla’s aunt, says in the KREM.com video below. “But they’re not. When you watch Kayla none of it’s hard.”

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KREM.com

The Mighty, in partnership with Fuck Cancer, is asking the following: Write a letter to yourself in regards to a cancer diagnosis. What would you say or wish someone had told you? Find out how to email us a story submission here.

 



In May 2013, when Michael Tatalovich, a senior from Henderson, Nev., found out he had a Stage 1 Ewing’s sarcoma, a cancerous bone tumor, he decided he was going to share his battle with the disease on Instagram.

“I don’t believe the ugly or shocking sides of my condition should be hidden,” he wrote on the picture-sharing site. “It’s part of the journey and wholly illustrating my experience is something I would like to accomplish.”

A year later, Tatalovich is in recovery with no sign of the disease, according to his most recent Instagram post.

“In the past 365 days, I’ve learned more about myself and the process of life than many will learn in years,” he wrote. “This is not the end to my story though, just the marker of a difficult chapter ending.”

Below are a few pictures from Tatalovich’s journey. You can follow him on Instagram here.

h/t HuffPost Teen


Whenever Aiden Hyde was stuck in the hospital, Nemo, Marlin and even Bruce the sharp-toothed shark kept him company.

The 5-year-old from Sydney, Australia, had Stage 4 Neuroblastoma, a rare form of cancer. Luckily, after rounds and rounds of chemotherapy, he’s in remission, according to The Daily Telegraph. So, when the Make-A-Wish Foundation heard about his love for “Finding Nemo,” it decided to send him on a Great Barrier Reef adventure of his own.

“The promise of his wish has helped give him hope and keep him strong through some difficult times,” Jeremy Hyde, Aiden’s father, told the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

On Tuesday, April 29, that wish came true. Make-A-Wish sent Aiden on a scavenger hunt all over Cairns, Australia. The 5-year-old got to fly in a helicopter, take part in his own parade and snorkel until he found his favorite clownfish, Nemo. He even found a fan in Australian actor Eric Bana.

Real People. Real Stories.

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