This Boy Is On a Mission to Finish His ‘Wish List’ Before He Loses His Eyesight

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“If you were losing your eyesight, what would YOU want to see?”

Heidi Thaden-Pierce asks this question on the Facebook page she and her husband created for their 9-year-old son, Ben, who will soon be completely blind. Ben was born more than four months early, at 23 weeks gestation, according to WFAA. He weighed only 1 pound and 6 ounces, and complications from the early birth have left his eyesight steadily declining.

Now, Ben is on a mission to fulfill his “Wish List” of things to see before everything goes dark. And thanks to his friends, family, community — and complete strangers — he’s starting to get through that list.

He’s been to a farm, the beach, a planetarium and more. He’s even been to the Wizarding World of Harry Potter in Orlando, Fla., thanks to an anonymous sponsor.


Soon, he’ll get to see the Big Apple.


“It does feel pretty urgent to us that we try to get him to as many of these places as quickly as we can,” Ben’s mom tells WFAA in the video below. “But when we look how far he’s come and how many odds he’s overcome and how amazing it is that he’s even here, it gives us hope that maybe we’ll pull off a few more miracles.”


You can view Ben’s wish list here, and visit his Facebook page to follow his journey.

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Kathryn Driscoll's Brilliant Response To Advertisers Leaving Out Kids With Disabilities

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Katie Driscoll was looking at an ad for actress Tory Spelling‘s children’s clothing line, “Little Maven,” when she first had the idea.

If Driscoll, a fan of Spelling, recreated the ad but included kids with disabilities – her daughter, Grace, who has Down syndrome, being one of them – the image probably wouldn’t look that different. In fact, it wouldn’t look different at all. But its message would speak volumes.

“I wanted people to see the kids in the ad, ones with disabilities and ones without, and realize that we’re all people,” Driscoll told The Mighty. “We look the same when we’re together even though each person is unique.”

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Little Maven took notice – the brand featured a 2013 holiday lookbook that included differently-abled children. Driscoll’s daughter was one of the models.

It was the first major victory in Driscoll’s effort to show the world that differences don’t make a person any less beautiful or capable. Since Grace’s birth, this has been her goal. Through her blog, “5 Boys + 1 Girl Photography,”  Driscoll has shared photographs of her kids and other people’s kids, all with different capabilities. Within that, she’s started a campaign called “Changing the Face of Beauty,” in hopes of convincing companies to include differently-abled children and young adults in ad campaigns.


While Driscoll works with more companies to jump on board – she can’t disclose which ones she’s currently talking with – she’s always upfront about her mission.

“We’re all people,” she repeats to The Mighty. “And at the end of the day acceptance can’t happen until society sees our loved ones as capable.”

Visit Driscoll’s blog to see her complete series, and scroll down to see a few of her perfectly-capable models.

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A Complete Stranger's Incredible Act of Kindness May Dramatically Change This Little Girl's Life

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Christy Harding says she’s not sure why she stopped scrolling when she saw 2-year-old Arianna Moore’s picture on her Facebook timeline. But something compelled her to click and read about the little girl in Pine City, Minn., who needed a new kidney.

Arianna has a rare genetic kidney disorder, according to KARE11, which requires her to be on dialysis treatment every night for 10 to 12 hours. When no one in her family was a match for a kidney transplant, her parents made a Facebook page, “ALL4MOORE,” to raise awareness.


Harding, from Jacksonville, Fla., — 1,500 miles away from Arianna — saw that page.

“It said, ‘If you’re Type-O blood, you could be her hero,’ and I thought, I am type O blood,” Harding told First Coast News. She called the Minnesota children’s hospital where Arianna was being treated to see if she was a match. When she found out she was, she emailed Arianna’s mom, Ashley Booth, to let her know she’d be donating a kidney. Harding is heading to Minnesota on Monday, May 5. The transplant will take place two days later.

“It’s so amazing. We haven’t even met her yet,” Booth told ABC. “I cannot wait for next Monday. I don’t know if I’ll be able to let go of her once I hug her.”

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Professor Finds Wildly Fun Way to Bring Mobility to Kids With Disabilities

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While Cole Galloway was walking the aisles of Toys ‘R’ Us, he came up with an idea that would prevent kids with cognitive and physical disabilities from ever being left out at playtime.

Galloway, a physical therapy professor and infant behavior expert at the University of Delaware, knew that for toddlers and young children, being mobile is a key part of having fun and building confidence. What if, he thought, those electric racecars in toy stores could be made to cater to a child’s disability? In that moment, the Go Baby Go! project was born.


Galloway’s racecars are designed for children who might not be old enough to use electric wheelchairs, according to NationSwell. In the video above, you can see how he customizes each car for a child’s specific disability. The overall goal is to make these kids feel like kids.

“Fun is key here,” Galloway says on Go Baby Go!’s website. “It unlocks brain development and exploratory drive for the child, and ignites active, engaged play from adults and peers.”

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Powerade Ad Tells Athlete's Incredible Life Story in Just 2 Minutes

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Sure, the video below is produced by Powerade. But when you watch the life story of Nico Calabria, a young man with one leg who’s now on the U.S. National Men’s Amputee Soccer Team, buying a sports drink will be the last thing on your mind. 

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The Blind Are Asked to Describe Beauty. These Are Their Answers.

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