Captivating Photo Series Shows What Autism Looks Like Around the World


In the last two years, Debbie Rasiel has traveled through six countries to photograph families affected by autism. She’s met children across the spectrum — some don’t talk; some have physical, maybe even violent, outbursts. She’s met their parents and siblings, too — with a translator, she’s spoken to many of them. She’s watched and learned about different types of therapies available in countries like Mexico, Iceland and Indonesia. She’s experienced differences in culture and language, in weather and in class.

“The thing is, it’s always so similar,” Rasiel, 53, told The Mighty. “At the end of the day, even with the cultural differences, it’s the same. It’s a mother who is worried about her child’s future. It’s a special needs family. It’s autism.”

The New York City-based photographer calls her two-year endeavor, “Picturing Autism.” This past May, it debuted at SOHO20 Chelsea Gallery, but the project is ongoing — Rasiel is currently planning a trip to Vietnam. With the help of autism Facebook groups and the Global Autism Project, she’s found ways to connect with families from all over the world.

She’s comfortable photographing autism because she’s familiar with the disorder; her 23-year-old son, Lee, is on the spectrum. So when she talks to families, she’s talking as an artist and photographer, of course, but she’s also speaking as a mother.

“I’m not rattled,” Rasiel told The Mighty. “I’ve seen it all.”

When someone affected by autism, either directly or through a loved one, sees her photos, she hopes, above all, they feel less alone.

“[Autism] is in every country. It’s a global village we’re in. It’s everywhere. No one is alone,” Raisel said. “You’re a part of something larger.”

Take a look at “Picturing Autism” below and view the full series here.

Queens, New York

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Cuzco, Peru

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Oaxaca, Mexico

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Lima, Peru

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East Harlem, New York

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Reykjavick, Iceland

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Hveragerði, Arnessysla, Iceland

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Jakarta, Indonesia

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