This Is What It Means to Have a Love Chromosome


1555402_10152259464688530_86087764_n Julie Tennant’s grandfather has a knack for explaining things.

For example, when Tennant was diagnosed with Down syndrome — a genetic condition in which a person has 47 instead of 46 chromosomes — her grandfather began calling her extra chromosome her “love chromosome.”

The nickname stuck. Today, Tennant, 38, works with her brother, Derrick, to spread one message: “I love my life.”

Tennant shares the same message when she talks to new parents of children with Down syndrome.

“I think your baby will be happy,” she wrote years ago in a letter (below) to a couple whose newborn had recently been diagnosed. “Like me.”

Julie's letter to Jeff and Sara

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