My Kid Is the One Trying to Get Inside Your House This Halloween…


It happens every year.

There’s a lot of prep and apt timing on our part of getting the costume on (and feeling right). Sometimes only half a costume actually gets worn. There are no wigs, masks or make up. Usually our prep includes several weeks of practice trick-or-treating at both our home and therapy. Due to the fact that in the past Timothy had absolutely no language, there was a bit of explaining at every door by Dad.

“Timothy has autism and doesn’t use words,” which gravitated to just a loud, “Thank you,” to eventually just a wave and smile if we got far enough. By “far enough,” I mean around the block without a meltdown.

While this year, he’s gained the ability to actually say “trick or treat” most of the time, he lacks the understanding and social graces of the average grade one kid. Autism’s kinda like that.

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So this year, I’m warning all of y’all in West Brant that you may have a home intruder on your hands. He’s about 3-foot, 11-inches tall, 50 pounds and will be dressed as a charming little Batman wannabe, who may or may not be wearing a mask. He’ll be excited, and he’ll be loud. He may try to run inside your house, but please have patience; he means no harm. His daddy is there and will be watching closely nearby trying to make his night as successful as possible.

Because Halloween should be enjoyed by all kids… kids with autism, Down syndrome, leukemia, cerebral palsy, kids who are walking or in a wheelchair — whatever their exceptionality may be. They are all kids.  Please be kind and treat them the same. Different is not wrong or weird. It’s just different.

Have a safe and Happy Halloween!

This post originally appeared on The Book of Timothy.

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