What I've Figured Out So Far About Autism and Christmas


Christmas in our home probably looks a lot different than it does in “typical” homes. We don’t leave cookies out for Santa or put on a big production about him coming. And when it comes to toys, well it couldn’t look any less typical.

photo 1 (1) My 7-year-old son has an obsession with things that are similar. Blocks, cotton balls Q-tips, marshmallows, spoons — basically any group of objects that are the same. He likes to take these objects and pour them from one bowl into another. At any given time, if you walk into our home, you will more than likely see him with two bowls and whatever random objects he’s selected for the moment. He’s had this fascination for as long as I can remember. I would be lying to you if I told you it didn’t bother me, because it does — or rather it used to, a lot

We’ve spent a lot of time in therapy over the past few years making attempts to try and get him to engage it typical toys like trucks, games, action figures. Every now and again, he’ll show an interest in something typical, but it’s rare. For the parent of a child with autism it can, at times, be hard to determine the difference between trying to teach them to try new things and attempting to put a square peg into a round hole.

The truth is, in the past when we’ve made these therapeutic attempts to try and get him to like typical toys, there’s been this tiny little tinge in my belly that says, “You’re trying to put a square peg into a round hole.” I remember reading a quote (I forget who said it) that essentially said, “The problem with pounding a square peg into a round hole is that you’re destroying the peg in the process.” That was a statement that had a pretty profound affect on me. That quote forced me to look at why this mattered so much to me. This entire time, had I been hoping to change my square peg into a round one? Before my son was born, I’d always assumed he’d be a round peg.  Everyone gets a round one, don’t they? I didn’t know anyone with a square one. I mean sure, I’d heard of square pegs, but square pegs are what happen to other people, right?

Well, as it turns out, I didn’t get a round peg. I got a square one. The day I found out I had a square peg, I was shocked and, truth be told, scared… damn scared. There was never a question about whether or not I’d be able to love him; I loved him the second I laid eyes on him. I was scared about whether or not that love would be enough. Could I be enough? Would I be able to give him every thing he needs? Could I embrace his sharp edges? Would I be able to reach deep into his corners? Along this journey we call autism, I’ve learned so many lessons, and one of the more important ones is this: to try and somehow force him to be round was a failure on my part to celebrate his square. 

photo.PNG-5 We no longer try to force typical toys in therapeutic sessions. Instead, sometimes I’ll buy him a new toy and if likes it, great! If he doesn’t, I’m not going to force it. Period. So that brings me to Christmas in our house. Finding presents for my little guy isn’t always easy. I spend a lot of time in the crafts store finding some things I think he’d like. And the upside to this autism-quirky-square peg of his is that I’m not in the middle of the toy section challenging another parent to a dual over the latest and greatest toy that all the round kids want. That’s what we in the biz like to call “winning.”  No, most likely you’ll find me alone somewhere in the crafts section stocking up on Popsicle sticks, soft craft poms or foam shapes. As I’m shopping for my special little square Christmas, I find myself thinking, “Maybe Christmas doesn’t come from a store, maybe Christmas perhaps means a little bit more.” (Who doesn’t love a good Dr. Seuss quote, am I right?) Christmas is a time for celebration! And in our case it means celebrating the gifts you receive, even if they’re not quite what you expected. Some of life’s greatest gifts are the ones you never saw coming. Celebrate your square.

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