Boy in a blue polo shirt, sitting on the grass

I Rely on My Son’s Teacher to Share the Details of His School Day With Me


For a parent of a child with special needs who may be limited in their ability to verbally express what transpired throughout their school day, communication between teacher and parent is key.

When I have a conversation with my son, Leo, who has autism, about his day, it might go like this:

Me: Leo, your note home said you had a good day?

Leo: Good day? (This is an echoic response.)

What did you learn today?

Leo:

Me: Did you eat all of your lunch?

Leo: Lunch? (This is also an echoic response.)

Me: What was your favorite thing that you did at school today?

Leo:

Me: I’m so proud of you, my Leo.

And I am, always, infinitely proud of my boy. 

There will come a day when he will tell me about every facet of his school day, and I will bask in every glorious detail. But for now, I must rely on his school and on his teacher to help me fill in the blanks.

That communication is so important. The details are necessary… Vital.

It is the difference between feeling like I’m stumbling about in the darkness, each trepid step marked with uncertainty, and feeling like I’m on a clearly lit path.

Every day, I send Leo to school for roughly seven hours. And when he returns, I rely on those details from school to give me insight into his day. So that I can talk with my child about the moments he expressed joy, the challenges he faced, what sparked his interest.

So that I may navigate my way through his world with him through that clearly lit path, rather than in the darkness, hands outstretched, grasping at anything that will help me understand what my boy sees and feels while I’m not there.

Follow this journey on Facebook at My Life With Leo.

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

TOPICS
,
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Related to Autism Spectrum Disorder

mother and son sitting together on lawn

The One Thing I Want for My Son With Autism in the Future

Shelby: “Whenever any of us asked you what you wanted for us when we grew up, what did you say?” M’Lynn: “Shelby, I’m not in the mood to play games.” Shelby: “Just tell me what you said, Mama. What did you say?” M’Lynn: “The only thing I have ever said to you, ever, is that I want you to [...]

My Autism Diagnosis Finally Helped Me Understand My Family

I’ve always known that my grandmother, Frances, and I are alike. We share, to one degree or another, many of the same behaviors and ways of seeing the world that finally drove me toward my own autism diagnosis. I wouldn’t have survived without my grandmother and her partner. They fed and clothed me, paid the [...]
Autism Speaks Logo

Autism Speaks Is Changing Its Mission For the First Time in Over 10 Years

Autism Speaks is changing its mission for the first time since it was founded in 2005. The organization is the largest autism advocacy group in the U.S. Its founding objective was to find a cure for autism. Rather than focusing on a cure for autism, the nonprofit says it will now look towards advancing research into causes and better therapies [...]
Vector sketch of a boy reading on a park bench.

When Someone Says, ‘He Has Autism? But He Seems So Smart.’

Has anyone ever said this about you or your child? When I work with parents of children on the autism spectrum, they tell me a typical unsolicited comment includes, “Oh, your child is on the spectrum? But he seems so smart!” When I was growing up on the spectrum, I was seen exactly like this because of my ability to [...]