Why I Became a Disability Advocate in Nigeria


One good thing that has happened in my life is developing the ability to understand my place in society and take a stand, even if I stand alone. I have developed the courage to understand that disability does not only affect persons who live with one, it also affects their relatives by blood or by marriage.

I have been married to a visually impaired man for eight years, and I have observed people seeing me through the different perceptions they have of a person with a disability. Some see me as an extortionist who wants to take advantage of a blind man. Some see me as an unfortunate young woman who is taking “shelter” under the refuge of a blind man, or as a kind woman who has decided to marry someone “no one else would want to marry.” Only a few see me without judgment.

I get irritated by their perceptions, and at times I used to tell my husband not to introduce me because I do not want to see the judgment in their eyes or words. But I think differently now, because I know their understanding is based on what they know. So I am ready to raise my voice for the change I want to see.

One fateful day, my husband and I boarded a public transport on the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lane. This transport provides quick access to persons with a disability; they do not have to queue nor buy tickets. At the boarding gate, the bus administrator harassed me, saying I cannot board the bus and seat since I did not queue with my husband. I explained to her that I have my ticket and I need to sit with the person with a disability I’m supporting in mobility.

Whatever people perceive of me or I experience in the environment, I have decided to take up a challenge to increase awareness of disability. I know ignorance is a major reason for discrimination. I can’t blame people for what they do not know, but I have to teach them what they need to know. In this vein, I founded the Disability Awareness and Development Initiative (DADI) here in Nigeria in 2015 with the sole vision to increase awareness of disability by building a network of voices to speak for inclusion in the public and private sector.

I have commenced by building a network of mothers and wives of persons with disabilities to create a platform where they can share their experiences, knowledge, mentor each other and strengthen their advocacy skills. We are also engaged in disability awareness outreach to schools, churches, mosques and corporate organizations.

This has become my life. I can’t exhaust the story.

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