The Truth About What My Chronic Illnesses Really Look Like


Many chronic illnesses are described as “invisible illnesses.” Depression, anxiety, chronic fatigue syndrome, Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, autoimmune disease…they all have one thing in common: most of their symptoms are invisible to outsiders.

Like many others with chronic illness, I have become very good at hiding how I really feel. Since I don’t generally walk around with a sign saying, “I have chronic illness,” my friends, family, colleagues and acquaintances, would be forgiven for thinking I’m perfectly healthy.

Before I got sick, I think I’d have found this concept hard to understand. I’d have assumed that no one could possibly hide how they’re really feeling all the time, and that I’d notice if someone was really that ill. Now, of course, I know different.

When my sickness level is a nine out of 10, I stay at home. I call in sick from work or work from home, I cancel my social plans, and I skip my yoga class. No one sees the really sick version of me. Well, no one except my parents and my boyfriend.

When my sickness level is a seven or eight out of 10, I do minimal activities. I might head into the office for a few hours and leave at lunchtime. I might pop to the shop. But that’s about it. I’m likely to do these things with plenty of painkillers, and I’ll avoid speaking to anyone. If I seem quiet or grumpy or stressed, it’s probably just that I’m having a seven or eight kind of day, and I am just about able to make it to the office but I feel too sick for conversation.

When I’m at a five or six sickness level, I’ll do most of my usual activities. I’ll do a whole day at work, I’ll meet my friends for coffee if we’ve made prior arrangements. I do these things feeling very tired, and a little fluey, but it’s manageable and I’m normally able to hold a conversation and keep a smile on my face. Anything below a five on the sickness level is rare, but on the occasional two though four days, I’ll be on top of the world! I’ll be the first one in the office and the last one to leave, I’ll be joking and laughing and making conversation. I’ll be at yoga and then I’ll meet a friend for dinner. I’ll be, for all intents and purposes, normal.

So if you see me and you think I look quite healthy, either it’s a particularly good day, or it is a moderately good day and I am just about holding it together. The true sick version of me rarely shows her face, and if I did, I really think my friends and colleagues would be horrified.

So what does chronic illness really look like? On those days when I wake up and can barely make it out of bed, or when I walk through the front door after a whole day spent in the office wondering how on earth I’m going to make it til 5 p.m… What does it look like, behind closed doors?

There are normally pajamas, dressing gowns and blankets involved. I will often have my head in my mobile phone or on my laptop, researching this horrible disease, trying to find the right balance of self-educating without causing myself panic and upset. There will be no makeup, no brushed hair, no nice clothes. There are lots of cups of tea. There may be a nice dinner if I feel able to make something, or if my boyfriend is around to cook, otherwise, there will be takeaway or leftovers or whatever scraps I can find in the fridge. There are few smiles, few jokes, few memories to be made. There are tears. Sometimes there are a couple of tears that can be wiped away and pushed to one side. Sometimes there are inconsolable sobs as the enormity of how terrible I feel and how tired I am of feeling terrible, comes to the forefront.

Behind closed doors, chronic illness is ugly. It is unwashed, undressed, it is grubby. It is lonely and isolating. It is both stressful and boring at the same time. Sometimes I feel like a fraud for writing about how hard chronic illness is, about how sick I feel, because I know that for anyone looking from the outside in, I look like a normal, happy, healthy young woman. Please know that I hide the truth. Please know that looks can be deceiving. Please know that behind closed doors, chronic illness really is an ugly old beast.

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Thinkstock Image By: Julia_Sudnitskaya


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