Angela Owen

@angowen
Community Voices

Healing While at Work

<p>Healing While at Work</p>
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Community Voices

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Community Voices

Hi, I’m new

<p>Hi, I’m new</p>
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Community Voices

When we hear about loss in the world, it gives us pause. It reminds us of our own loss. Families impacted, families lost, loved ones gone, friends gone too early. It reminds us of our own mortality. It reminds us that it is important to love all those around you for we know not the time nor date. Life comes at us fast and can be taken just as quickly. For those who've lost, I share with you these words:

If I had just one more day,
What would I say?
Would it make you stay?
I love you. I need you.
Just one more day.
Don't go. Not yet.
We'll all be upset.
If I had just one more day
What would I say?
Did I not take the time to see?
Was this the only way to be pain-free?
I can't let go. I can't forget.
From that day forward,
It's been all regret.
Where did I go astray?
How did I let you slip away?
Why wasn't I there that fateful day?
If I had just one more day,
What would I say?
Would I even know the right things to say?
Because I didn't on that final day, and in my thoughts...that will always stay.
But if you get just one more day,
Always take the time to say,
"I love you. Is there something YOU want to say?" I'm here to listen to you today.
And If I had just one more day,
Now I know what I would say. Nothing.
I would just simply be there for you on that day.
I would just listen. With my heart, my ears, to your dreams, fears, and tears. Sometimes there is nothing we can say, but we all could use...just one more day. - Phillip Tyler

#Stories2Connect #lossofchild #SuicideLossSurvivor #SuicideAwareness #Grief #griefjourney

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Community Voices

On the Mental Path Forward

<p>On the Mental Path Forward</p>
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Community Voices

Hi, I’m new

<p>Hi, I’m new</p>
20 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Survive Together: Suicide Loss Survivor Study

Why Are We Conducting This Study? In 2016, nearly 45,000 people died by suicide in the Unites States alone. For each suicide, somewhere between six and 20 family and friends are affected. Every year around one to three quarter million people are touched by suicide. Despite this growing need, there remains much to be learned about how people bereaved by suicide can grow and recover in the wake of a loss. During the acute stages of grief (i.e. less than six-months post loss) habits and tendencies relating to how a person thinks and feels about the loss develop. These mental habits can set the course for the rest of the grieving process. As a result, this represents a critical time period in which to develop a potential intervention. For this reason, the Survive Together research study at the New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University Department of Psychiatry seeks to understand the thoughts, feelings and brain-responses that occur during acute grieving which promote long-term growth and wellness. This knowledge will serve as the basis for a treatment strategy aimed at helping people grow and thrive in the wake of their loss. What Can You Do? The Survive Together study presents an opportunity for suicide loss survivors to contribute to our mission of helping people grieving suicide. We are looking for people who have lost a loved one to suicide within the past five months. You can participate even if you do not live near NYC. If interested, please contact schneck@nyspi.columbia.edu for further details. How Does This Work? The human brain is equipped with resilience tools that help a person grow and thrive after painful events. However, not all people are able to respond to painful events in this way, and sometimes the pain is too overwhelming. Survive Together aims to identify the resilience tools that help people adapt and grow in the wake of a suicide loss, using a brain imaging technique called functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI). By identifying the brain’s resilience tools for dealing with suicide-loss, we will be able to develop treatment techniques to help people use their brain more effectively to find wellness, meaning and growth after losing a loved one to suicide. Please note: This study is recruiting until 2023, however participation is only possible within five months after loss.

Community Voices

seems these days that being a nice person only brings pain and sorrow. I have thought about suicide multiple times. Threw myself on drugs. (Cocaine and weed) so I dont have to think about how lonely and pointless my life is. I am rich and beautiful. I have a family who loves me. What more can I ask for? Loving the wrong people destroyed me. I have ups and downs. Not taking too many drugs anymore but theres is this paon in my chest that just won’t go away. Its been years. I am suffering continuesly but don’t know how to make it stop. People find me ridiculous because I should be the happiest person on earth. Noone understands truly. I am simply a much compassionate/ sensitive and empathic person. I suffer 10000 times more than normal people because I feel more. Hence i started to do drugs in order to feel less and being able to live normally
#MightyPoets

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Sue

Notice me please!

Can anyone please follow me? i feel like I’m talking to myself here too and I’m going crazy just to get the feeling that anyone might be listening to me. Ps: i hate i feel this way and i feel embarrassed and it’s totally okay to not do it too i just don’t to feel alone here too cause this application is the only thing that gave me hope. #aloneinthedark #Anxiety #suffering #AnxietySymptoms

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