Delia Samson

@dels_3 | contributor
Hey there beautiful souls! I am an autistic young adult, navigating a fairly new diagnosis (I was diagnosed with autism at age 19). I also have OCD, severe anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Most days, I am very high-functioning. Other days, not so much. I find solace in hearing other people's stories about their struggles and triumphs. I hope my story will one day allow someone to know they are not alone.
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Why Social Distancing and Sheltering In Place Is A Struggle

My name is Delia. I am isolated, I am depressed, and I am anxious. And like everyone else right now, I’m just doing my best to get through this pandemic one day at a time.

I am a 21-year-old with autism, OCD, anxiety, non-verbal learning disorder, and depression. Due to the struggles that arise from having these disorders, I spend a fair amount of time at home when my symptoms are severe. I often isolate, sleep more often than usual,  and won’t leave the house for days because I am too anxious, depressed, and/or overloaded by sensory sensitivities to engage in everyday activities. Social distancing and sheltering in place is a somewhat normal occurrence for me in my everyday life.

Now with the rise of COVID-19 cases in the United States, causing social distancing and shelter in place measures to be implemented by the government, it should feel like a normal day for me.  But it doesn’t. Sure, having almost everyone else be in the same boat as me, as far as not being able to leave the house, takes off the pressure of being forced to leave the house on a bad day. However, I was working hard to use my tools to combat the symptoms of my mental illnesses and sensory sensitivities, due to autism, and now those tools are gone.

There are no clothing stores, book stores, or gift shops open for me to roam the aisles and window shop just so I can feel accomplished about leaving the house. There are no social events to look forward to where I know someone will be happy to see that I showed up. There is no church open where I can stop by and find some peace in prayer. There are no friends that I can reach out to, to receive hugs. My go-to’s on hard days have been taken away from me, at least for the next eight weeks.

I have tried to engage in other self-care techniques such as running, listening to music, painting, writing, and praying. I have also reached out to friends to check-in over the phone. But finding the time to do the things that help me has been a struggle. Instead of having free time, since I don’t have to drive anywhere and most of my social life is on pause, I find myself booked back-to-back with online meetings, class lectures, and work.

I am currently a college student and staying on task with school is extremely overwhelming with the sudden change from face-to-face classes to online learning. Many of my accommodations do not apply to an online format, which means I have to find new strategies to help me to continue doing well in my classes. Accessing the support I need to succeed in school requires me to allow extra time in my schedule for personal meetings with professors and the disability services director from my university. I also have to set aside time to meet my therapist and doctors via telahealth portals. All this rearranging of my schedule has sent me into a whirlwind of anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

So even though sheltering in place and social distancing is nothing new to me, it is very difficult for me during this time. I am just trying my best to keep up with the changing world around me and stay healthy, both physically and mentally. If you too are struggling, I hope by reading this you know you are not alone.

50 people are talking about this