Georgia Vine

@georgiavineot | contributor
I am an occupational therapy student, an ambassador for CP Teens UK, and Digital Production Director & Global Students ambassador for Occupational Therapist Without Borders. I am very determined to never let my disability get in the way of living my life my way. I face any challenges that life throws at me. I chose to train to be an occupational therapist, because when I was younger, my occupational therapists were phenomenal, they played a highly significant role in my life, and they inspired me to apply for this career. If I can make half the impact on an individual that they've made on me, and my family, then I know it is all worthwhile.
Georgia Vine

The Long Road to Passing My Driving Test With Cerebral Palsy

Around 18 months ago, I wrote a story for The Mighty about learning how to drive with cerebral palsy, and a lot has changed since then so I thought I’d update you all! Last October, almost four years after applying for my driving license, I passed my driving test. I want to discuss what passing my test means to me, and share the not-so-easy-journey to passing my test during a global pandemic! Passing my test is so significant to me and will really change my life. It will enable me to be more independent. You see, it’s hard for me to use the bus to visit friends or go out. Now that I can drive, I feel like I can finally start living my life as a 20-year-old (not without considering the pandemic, of course). My original driving test was meant to happen in April. I wasn’t really ready to take it yet, but I booked it for the experience, and the fact that my instructor was moving.  I didn’t want to have another instructor because I knew I’d never get on as well with another instructor. Having a connection with your driving instructor is important for anyone, but with my disability, I really needed someone that understood me and got my needs. So, I was determined to pass my test with my instructor. I started lessons again in July, and luckily my instructor was still around, but I knew time was running out. I was also worried that my theory test certificate would run out as well. Then the “second wave” of the pandemic happened. It all tested my anxiety levels. I was super nervous for my first lesson after the break, as I felt that all my hard work had been undone and I’d have to go back to basics. However, I wasn’t as bad as expected and my instructor advised me to book my test for August. I never took the test in August, my anxiety was far too high, and although we knew it was unlikely that I’d pass and we thought we would treat the test as an “experience.” We still decided to cancel it, as it probably would have made my anxiety much worse, as at this point I was having a meltdown every lesson. I really don’t know how my instructor put up with me. I booked another test for September. I was feeling much better about my test, it was at a more suitable time, I still had another month. I was feeling more positive, and this time I did it. I failed, but I did it, and as deflated as I was because I failed, I was so proud considering that the month before, I couldn’t even make it through a mock test without having a meltdown. Failing my first test just made me more determined to get this done. Time was ticking with my instructor and restrictions around COVID were getting tighter. I needed to get this done! I didn’t care about passing my test the first time or second time. If it took me 10 attempts, then that’s what it would take. It was the stress I didn’t want, as booking my second test was not straightforward. I spent hours (no exaggeration) on the phone, trying to book. I was told to wait a week, then when I almost got through, I had a lecture I needed to go to. It was so stressful and that was the part I wanted over! I meditated before my first test, but I really upped the meditation this time around. I tried different ones, and different apps to find the perfect one for me. I did different styles of meditation every day, rather than a program to help me look at meditation from different angles, and this really worked. I also booked in a massage to have the night before the test, to help me to relax, as relaxing is certainly my weakness. Everything seemed to be going my way, and my anxiety was improving… However, my electronic handbrake decided to stop working! Due to my car being so heavily adapted, it couldn’t go to a local garage, so it had to go back to the place where it got adapted. They were amazing, they ordered the part straightaway, and a week later my car was fixed. While the car was in the garage, they also checked that all the systems in the car that operate my adaptions were working correctly and did all the updates needed. This put my mind at rest. Everything was now in place before test number two! Nothing else could go wrong now, right? The day before my test, the computer that controls my adaptation displayed an error, and therefore Paravan Space Drive (the computer) totally shut down, and I couldn’t use my adaptation. Aggghhh. I don’t know how I didn’t cry, I was 24 hours away from my test, with a car that I couldn’t drive. I was so ready for this test, and the fact that it was potentially going to get canceled was soul-destroying. My dad phoned the garage that deals with my car and explained the situation. Thankfully, they came and solved the issue. Luckily, that was the last scare that my car gave me, as I passed my test the next day! My journey to get here has been very bumpy, but I did it, and that’s all that matters. Don’t get me wrong, there are certainly elements of my journey that I would change if I could. But now, I’ve finally got my pink license and I can be independent and that is all that matters. Driving will give me so much more freedom, and I can’t wait to see what my future holds now that I can finally drive.

Georgia Vine

Learning to Drive in the U.K. With Cerebral Palsy

I’ve had a few people ask me to share my experience learning to drive with cerebral palsy as they find it very useful and insightful. I think if I’d read a blog post about someone’s driving experience when I was 15, I would be a lot further in this journey. So put your seat belt on, because this is quite a story! When I started to plan for college at 16, I realized what I’d always known was about to change. My timetable wasn’t 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. every day, so my parents could no longer drop me off and pick me up. This meant I would be getting a lot more taxis, and the thought of being in a taxi alone made me feel vulnerable. But I thought I’ll start driving lessons soon, and then in the second year I’ll be able to drive. Six months before my 17th birthday I applied for my provisional license. My 16-year-old-self thought it would be enough time to get the ball rolling, not knowing what was ahead. As a result of my cerebral palsy I have epilepsy, which didn’t make getting my provisional license easy, despite not having a seizure in 12 years. But after filling out multiple forms, I got my provisional license three months later. The process itself took a lot longer than I anticipated. As soon as my provisional license came, we started looking for a disabled driving instructor, knowing I’d probably need a little extra support. After another few months of phone calls, I finally had my first driving lesson two days after my 17th birthday. I didn’t know when you’re disabled you can start lessons at 16, but I didn’t mind getting started a little late as I was at the same place as my peers, and I was where I wanted to be. My first lesson was meant to be two hours, but after an hour I was on my way back home as we discovered I needed further adaptions. The next stage was to go to a center to be assessed. It took five months to get an appointment, but I didn’t mind because I could start over summer when I wasn’t at college, meaning I could have more lessons and speed up the process. The day finally arrived. I was going to the assessment center and I thought I could see light at the end of the tunnel. It was a long day; the tests included trying different adaptations as well as having reading and cognitive tests. You name it, I had it. It was quite a draining day, so I slept most of the journey home. The occupational therapist concluded I was too weak in my legs to be able to use the brake and accelerator, so we explored alternative options, one of them being a lighter steering wheel which had the brake and accelerator attached. We discovered I couldn’t use my legs and that I was cognitively able to drive, but we didn’t have a way for me to drive. I came out of the assessment feeling deflated as this was the first time I’d realized I may never be able to drive. I was then referred to have another assessment with a driving instructor. The wait for this assessment was only a month, and during that time I was ready to go on holiday and just forget about driving. Once again, the day came, but this time I wasn’t that excited as I didn’t want to get my hopes up for them to be demolished again. However, this assessment turned out to be the best one as we managed to find an adaptation I was able to use — a tiller which works a bit like the handlebars on a bike. After we decided the tiller was the adaptation for me, it meant more waiting. This was because at the time, there were only two vans in the country fitted with this adaptation for student drivers. I would have to have my own vehicle adapted before I learned how to drive, which resulted in more assessments to ensure this was the right adaptation. Another six months went by, filled with a load more phone calls, emails and letters. The guy that came was lovely. He walked in and straight away said, “You’re going to get this adaptation. Our number one priority is to get you driving.” I was relieved I hadn’t waited another six months to get rejected. Just an update for those not counting, the total I’d been waiting at this stage from applying for my provisional license was 18 months. Now it was time to hunt for cars — exciting, although my options were quite limited. I needed a car big enough for a hoist for my electric wheelchair, however, a lot of the bigger cars require someone over 25 to drive them. A few months went by, and we’d picked a car and got the ball rolling. Little did we know that our plans were about to get knocked back again. The plan was to get the car and then send it away for it to be adapted with the tiller, but the company was having trouble getting hold of the car. At this point I was thinking I’ll just have to wait until I turn 25 before I can drive. Fast forward four months, we finally had a car and the adaptation process could begin! At this point, I was going back a forth a bit to have fittings. Once again, the car took a lot longer to be adapted than we thought, but it had to be perfect even if that put another four months on! During this time, I decided that it was time to learn the rules of the road. I was eager to start driving lessons, but there was nothing I could do apart from wait — I’d played my part at this stage. It’s now 34 months later, I finally have my car and have started my driving lessons. My life is always going to be full of unexpected battles — it’s just part of CP — but even though it’s frustrating, it only makes the result more worthwhile. After all this waiting, I’d be lying if I said I don’t want it to all be over and to pass my test. But doesn’t everyone? Driving will be great for me, as it’ll give me much more independence to go places alone in my chair. It will be worth it in the end, but at least now I can see the light at the end of the tunnel! There have been so many people involved in this journey that I would like to thank, especially my parents for literally spending days on the phone. If it wasn’t for their hard work, I wouldn’t be at this stage!

Georgia Vine

Learning to Drive in the U.K. With Cerebral Palsy

I’ve had a few people ask me to share my experience learning to drive with cerebral palsy as they find it very useful and insightful. I think if I’d read a blog post about someone’s driving experience when I was 15, I would be a lot further in this journey. So put your seat belt on, because this is quite a story! When I started to plan for college at 16, I realized what I’d always known was about to change. My timetable wasn’t 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. every day, so my parents could no longer drop me off and pick me up. This meant I would be getting a lot more taxis, and the thought of being in a taxi alone made me feel vulnerable. But I thought I’ll start driving lessons soon, and then in the second year I’ll be able to drive. Six months before my 17th birthday I applied for my provisional license. My 16-year-old-self thought it would be enough time to get the ball rolling, not knowing what was ahead. As a result of my cerebral palsy I have epilepsy, which didn’t make getting my provisional license easy, despite not having a seizure in 12 years. But after filling out multiple forms, I got my provisional license three months later. The process itself took a lot longer than I anticipated. As soon as my provisional license came, we started looking for a disabled driving instructor, knowing I’d probably need a little extra support. After another few months of phone calls, I finally had my first driving lesson two days after my 17th birthday. I didn’t know when you’re disabled you can start lessons at 16, but I didn’t mind getting started a little late as I was at the same place as my peers, and I was where I wanted to be. My first lesson was meant to be two hours, but after an hour I was on my way back home as we discovered I needed further adaptions. The next stage was to go to a center to be assessed. It took five months to get an appointment, but I didn’t mind because I could start over summer when I wasn’t at college, meaning I could have more lessons and speed up the process. The day finally arrived. I was going to the assessment center and I thought I could see light at the end of the tunnel. It was a long day; the tests included trying different adaptations as well as having reading and cognitive tests. You name it, I had it. It was quite a draining day, so I slept most of the journey home. The occupational therapist concluded I was too weak in my legs to be able to use the brake and accelerator, so we explored alternative options, one of them being a lighter steering wheel which had the brake and accelerator attached. We discovered I couldn’t use my legs and that I was cognitively able to drive, but we didn’t have a way for me to drive. I came out of the assessment feeling deflated as this was the first time I’d realized I may never be able to drive. I was then referred to have another assessment with a driving instructor. The wait for this assessment was only a month, and during that time I was ready to go on holiday and just forget about driving. Once again, the day came, but this time I wasn’t that excited as I didn’t want to get my hopes up for them to be demolished again. However, this assessment turned out to be the best one as we managed to find an adaptation I was able to use — a tiller which works a bit like the handlebars on a bike. After we decided the tiller was the adaptation for me, it meant more waiting. This was because at the time, there were only two vans in the country fitted with this adaptation for student drivers. I would have to have my own vehicle adapted before I learned how to drive, which resulted in more assessments to ensure this was the right adaptation. Another six months went by, filled with a load more phone calls, emails and letters. The guy that came was lovely. He walked in and straight away said, “You’re going to get this adaptation. Our number one priority is to get you driving.” I was relieved I hadn’t waited another six months to get rejected. Just an update for those not counting, the total I’d been waiting at this stage from applying for my provisional license was 18 months. Now it was time to hunt for cars — exciting, although my options were quite limited. I needed a car big enough for a hoist for my electric wheelchair, however, a lot of the bigger cars require someone over 25 to drive them. A few months went by, and we’d picked a car and got the ball rolling. Little did we know that our plans were about to get knocked back again. The plan was to get the car and then send it away for it to be adapted with the tiller, but the company was having trouble getting hold of the car. At this point I was thinking I’ll just have to wait until I turn 25 before I can drive. Fast forward four months, we finally had a car and the adaptation process could begin! At this point, I was going back a forth a bit to have fittings. Once again, the car took a lot longer to be adapted than we thought, but it had to be perfect even if that put another four months on! During this time, I decided that it was time to learn the rules of the road. I was eager to start driving lessons, but there was nothing I could do apart from wait — I’d played my part at this stage. It’s now 34 months later, I finally have my car and have started my driving lessons. My life is always going to be full of unexpected battles — it’s just part of CP — but even though it’s frustrating, it only makes the result more worthwhile. After all this waiting, I’d be lying if I said I don’t want it to all be over and to pass my test. But doesn’t everyone? Driving will be great for me, as it’ll give me much more independence to go places alone in my chair. It will be worth it in the end, but at least now I can see the light at the end of the tunnel! There have been so many people involved in this journey that I would like to thank, especially my parents for literally spending days on the phone. If it wasn’t for their hard work, I wouldn’t be at this stage!

Georgia Vine

Learning to Drive in the U.K. With Cerebral Palsy

I’ve had a few people ask me to share my experience learning to drive with cerebral palsy as they find it very useful and insightful. I think if I’d read a blog post about someone’s driving experience when I was 15, I would be a lot further in this journey. So put your seat belt on, because this is quite a story! When I started to plan for college at 16, I realized what I’d always known was about to change. My timetable wasn’t 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. every day, so my parents could no longer drop me off and pick me up. This meant I would be getting a lot more taxis, and the thought of being in a taxi alone made me feel vulnerable. But I thought I’ll start driving lessons soon, and then in the second year I’ll be able to drive. Six months before my 17th birthday I applied for my provisional license. My 16-year-old-self thought it would be enough time to get the ball rolling, not knowing what was ahead. As a result of my cerebral palsy I have epilepsy, which didn’t make getting my provisional license easy, despite not having a seizure in 12 years. But after filling out multiple forms, I got my provisional license three months later. The process itself took a lot longer than I anticipated. As soon as my provisional license came, we started looking for a disabled driving instructor, knowing I’d probably need a little extra support. After another few months of phone calls, I finally had my first driving lesson two days after my 17th birthday. I didn’t know when you’re disabled you can start lessons at 16, but I didn’t mind getting started a little late as I was at the same place as my peers, and I was where I wanted to be. My first lesson was meant to be two hours, but after an hour I was on my way back home as we discovered I needed further adaptions. The next stage was to go to a center to be assessed. It took five months to get an appointment, but I didn’t mind because I could start over summer when I wasn’t at college, meaning I could have more lessons and speed up the process. The day finally arrived. I was going to the assessment center and I thought I could see light at the end of the tunnel. It was a long day; the tests included trying different adaptations as well as having reading and cognitive tests. You name it, I had it. It was quite a draining day, so I slept most of the journey home. The occupational therapist concluded I was too weak in my legs to be able to use the brake and accelerator, so we explored alternative options, one of them being a lighter steering wheel which had the brake and accelerator attached. We discovered I couldn’t use my legs and that I was cognitively able to drive, but we didn’t have a way for me to drive. I came out of the assessment feeling deflated as this was the first time I’d realized I may never be able to drive. I was then referred to have another assessment with a driving instructor. The wait for this assessment was only a month, and during that time I was ready to go on holiday and just forget about driving. Once again, the day came, but this time I wasn’t that excited as I didn’t want to get my hopes up for them to be demolished again. However, this assessment turned out to be the best one as we managed to find an adaptation I was able to use — a tiller which works a bit like the handlebars on a bike. After we decided the tiller was the adaptation for me, it meant more waiting. This was because at the time, there were only two vans in the country fitted with this adaptation for student drivers. I would have to have my own vehicle adapted before I learned how to drive, which resulted in more assessments to ensure this was the right adaptation. Another six months went by, filled with a load more phone calls, emails and letters. The guy that came was lovely. He walked in and straight away said, “You’re going to get this adaptation. Our number one priority is to get you driving.” I was relieved I hadn’t waited another six months to get rejected. Just an update for those not counting, the total I’d been waiting at this stage from applying for my provisional license was 18 months. Now it was time to hunt for cars — exciting, although my options were quite limited. I needed a car big enough for a hoist for my electric wheelchair, however, a lot of the bigger cars require someone over 25 to drive them. A few months went by, and we’d picked a car and got the ball rolling. Little did we know that our plans were about to get knocked back again. The plan was to get the car and then send it away for it to be adapted with the tiller, but the company was having trouble getting hold of the car. At this point I was thinking I’ll just have to wait until I turn 25 before I can drive. Fast forward four months, we finally had a car and the adaptation process could begin! At this point, I was going back a forth a bit to have fittings. Once again, the car took a lot longer to be adapted than we thought, but it had to be perfect even if that put another four months on! During this time, I decided that it was time to learn the rules of the road. I was eager to start driving lessons, but there was nothing I could do apart from wait — I’d played my part at this stage. It’s now 34 months later, I finally have my car and have started my driving lessons. My life is always going to be full of unexpected battles — it’s just part of CP — but even though it’s frustrating, it only makes the result more worthwhile. After all this waiting, I’d be lying if I said I don’t want it to all be over and to pass my test. But doesn’t everyone? Driving will be great for me, as it’ll give me much more independence to go places alone in my chair. It will be worth it in the end, but at least now I can see the light at the end of the tunnel! There have been so many people involved in this journey that I would like to thank, especially my parents for literally spending days on the phone. If it wasn’t for their hard work, I wouldn’t be at this stage!

Community Voices
Community Voices

Why I Study Occupational Therapy

I have been considering writing this post for some time now and this is for 2 reasons. The first reason being that I just feel that I need to explain why I was drawn to occupational therapy and the second reasoning being to discuss my future with occupational therapy. But on the other hand these 2 reasons were the same reasons why I didn’t want to write this blog as I shouldn’t feel that I need to justify why I study what I study and I didn’t really want to discuss my future without knowing what the future holds. Then I realised that this blog post would be a great blog post to refer back to in the future and could potentially be a learning kerb so I thought I would give it a go, and at this minute whilst I’m sat here writing this I don’t know where this blog post is going to end up! So just stay with me because I do have a point or 2 to make!

Here we go point 1 and before I make this point, I am sorry if this comes across in a controversial way but this is a question that I have been meaning to answer for quite some time. I’m not going to bore you with all the reasons why I chose occupational therapy and why the course stuck out for me. But just for a bit of background information – occupational therapy was the right course for me as I’ve always wanted to explore the field of healthcare. OT also entails a lot of problem-solving as sometimes with occupational therapy the answer isn’t right in front of you so seen as I love maths this felt great Not to mention that the signature colour for occupational therapy is green just like CP I mean can it be more perfect!

However, the aim of this post is not to rewrite my personal statement the aim is to answer a few questions that I have been asked around occupational therapy since starting my university journey. So, let’s get the big question out of the way… ‘Why go into the system when you’ve just come out of it?’. I have been asked this question few times, sometimes it hasn’t been as direct as others but I’m capable of reading between the lines. I find this question quite annoying especially when it’s someone I’ve just met because it just makes me aware that I am probably never going to stop answering this question. Apart from the fact that I might not even go into the system (which relates to point 2), the thought of potentially going into the system and changing people’s life makes me feel even more determined to complete this course. This is not because I want to change the system. A big reason why I want to go into occupational therapy is because when I was younger my occupational therapists were just phenomenal and they played that much of significant role in my life, that they inspired me to go for this career. If I can make half the impact on an individual that they made on my family and I then I know it is all worthwhile.

The other questions I have been asked, have been around my capabilities within occupational therapy, these questions don’t annoy me as such because yes, my #Disability will always be the elephant in the room; again, this is based on so little understanding. Occupational therapy is such a board profession as you could be working in a clinic or hospital or you could be working in a driving skills centre. So, I think eventually I’ll find an area of occupational therapy that I want to work in, I’m not saying that it won’t be harder and that my options aren’t limited because it would be wrong of me to think that they weren’t. But I know that there is certainly a role in occupational therapy out there for me, that works with my needs.

This then links on to point 2… I’m only in my first year at university so I don’t have my heart set on an area of occupational therapy just yet but I have a better idea of what areas I want to and don’t want to explore than I did a year ago. A few weeks ago, I did a presentation about my blog (Not So Terrible Palsy), I wanted to make this presentation slightly more interesting and wanted to talk about more than just blogging. For a while now I’ve said that I’ve wanted to link occupational therapy in with blogging, so I had the idea of doing research about the impact of occupational therapy online to incorporate this into my presentation. Then after researching, I found that there wasn’t much around this, and I realised that this maybe the area suited for me.

This presentation was done recently therefore, I haven’t really had the chance to investigate this any further. However, prior to this I had also had a discussion with my university lectures about linking blogging in with occupational therapy, and from this, they had advised me to write this post. I’ve been towing with the idea of writing this post for sometime now because I didn’t want to tell everyone about my future in occupational therapy without knowing what would happen. I asked myself a lot of questions around this with one of the big ones being ‘Where am I going to start?’ and therefore I decided to write this post because this is where I am going to start. I can’t start something without a general idea of where it’s going to go just like I’d built up my work online before starting Not So Terrible Palsy. So, this is me starting my journey within occupational therapy!

You’re probably thinking why this post is named Why I Study Occupational Therapy and why did I talk about this if this is not the main reason why I wrote this blog. This is because the reasons for studying occupational therapy is also listed in point 2 as well as in point 1, even if it doesn’t seem apparent. I believe that I was born with #CerebralPalsy for a reason and from my previous work, I’ve realised this reason could be to create a link between the online community and occupational therapy. I study occupational therapy as I can bring to the table my personal experiences as well as professional experiences and this how blogging links into it even if this link isn’t visible yet. So, now that I’ve almost finished my first year, I can finally say that I know all the reason’s I study occupational therapy and why I’m more than willing to go back into the system!

As previously mentioned, I don’t quite know how and if this idea will work but what I do know is that I am very determined to get my idea off the ground!

Thank you for reading, I did warn you that it might be long!

Georgia

@georgiavine4213

@georgiaannv

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Community Voices

Why I Study Occupational Therapy

I have been considering writing this post for some time now and this is for 2 reasons. The first reason being that I just feel that I need to explain why I was drawn to occupational therapy and the second reasoning being to discuss my future with occupational therapy. But on the other hand these 2 reasons were the same reasons why I didn’t want to write this blog as I shouldn’t feel that I need to justify why I study what I study and I didn’t really want to discuss my future without knowing what the future holds. Then I realised that this blog post would be a great blog post to refer back to in the future and could potentially be a learning kerb so I thought I would give it a go, and at this minute whilst I’m sat here writing this I don’t know where this blog post is going to end up! So just stay with me because I do have a point or 2 to make!

Here we go point 1 and before I make this point, I am sorry if this comes across in a controversial way but this is a question that I have been meaning to answer for quite some time. I’m not going to bore you with all the reasons why I chose occupational therapy and why the course stuck out for me. But just for a bit of background information – occupational therapy was the right course for me as I’ve always wanted to explore the field of healthcare. OT also entails a lot of problem-solving as sometimes with occupational therapy the answer isn’t right in front of you so seen as I love maths this felt great Not to mention that the signature colour for occupational therapy is green just like CP I mean can it be more perfect!

However, the aim of this post is not to rewrite my personal statement the aim is to answer a few questions that I have been asked around occupational therapy since starting my university journey. So, let’s get the big question out of the way… ‘Why go into the system when you’ve just come out of it?’. I have been asked this question few times, sometimes it hasn’t been as direct as others but I’m capable of reading between the lines. I find this question quite annoying especially when it’s someone I’ve just met because it just makes me aware that I am probably never going to stop answering this question. Apart from the fact that I might not even go into the system (which relates to point 2), the thought of potentially going into the system and changing people’s life makes me feel even more determined to complete this course. This is not because I want to change the system. A big reason why I want to go into occupational therapy is because when I was younger my occupational therapists were just phenomenal and they played that much of significant role in my life, that they inspired me to go for this career. If I can make half the impact on an individual that they made on my family and I then I know it is all worthwhile.

The other questions I have been asked, have been around my capabilities within occupational therapy, these questions don’t annoy me as such because yes, my #Disability will always be the elephant in the room; again, this is based on so little understanding. Occupational therapy is such a board profession as you could be working in a clinic or hospital or you could be working in a driving skills centre. So, I think eventually I’ll find an area of occupational therapy that I want to work in, I’m not saying that it won’t be harder and that my options aren’t limited because it would be wrong of me to think that they weren’t. But I know that there is certainly a role in occupational therapy out there for me, that works with my needs.

This then links on to point 2… I’m only in my first year at university so I don’t have my heart set on an area of occupational therapy just yet but I have a better idea of what areas I want to and don’t want to explore than I did a year ago. A few weeks ago, I did a presentation about my blog (Not So Terrible Palsy), I wanted to make this presentation slightly more interesting and wanted to talk about more than just blogging. For a while now I’ve said that I’ve wanted to link occupational therapy in with blogging, so I had the idea of doing research about the impact of occupational therapy online to incorporate this into my presentation. Then after researching, I found that there wasn’t much around this, and I realised that this maybe the area suited for me.

This presentation was done recently therefore, I haven’t really had the chance to investigate this any further. However, prior to this I had also had a discussion with my university lectures about linking blogging in with occupational therapy, and from this, they had advised me to write this post. I’ve been towing with the idea of writing this post for sometime now because I didn’t want to tell everyone about my future in occupational therapy without knowing what would happen. I asked myself a lot of questions around this with one of the big ones being ‘Where am I going to start?’ and therefore I decided to write this post because this is where I am going to start. I can’t start something without a general idea of where it’s going to go just like I’d built up my work online before starting Not So Terrible Palsy. So, this is me starting my journey within occupational therapy!

You’re probably thinking why this post is named Why I Study Occupational Therapy and why did I talk about this if this is not the main reason why I wrote this blog. This is because the reasons for studying occupational therapy is also listed in point 2 as well as in point 1, even if it doesn’t seem apparent. I believe that I was born with #CerebralPalsy for a reason and from my previous work, I’ve realised this reason could be to create a link between the online community and occupational therapy. I study occupational therapy as I can bring to the table my personal experiences as well as professional experiences and this how blogging links into it even if this link isn’t visible yet. So, now that I’ve almost finished my first year, I can finally say that I know all the reason’s I study occupational therapy and why I’m more than willing to go back into the system!

As previously mentioned, I don’t quite know how and if this idea will work but what I do know is that I am very determined to get my idea off the ground!

Thank you for reading, I did warn you that it might be long!

Georgia

@georgiavine4213

@georgiaannv

2 people are talking about this
Community Voices

How my Physical Disability can be Perceived

As I am getting older I am becoming more aware of the stereotypes that people make when initially meeting me. When it comes to stereotypes I have mixed feelings, I don’t hate the fact that I get judged because that’s just part of life and everyone gets judged regardless of having a #Disability or not. But its the fact that the judgement comes from such of a little understanding! I’ve always made it pretty clear that I ’embrace being disabled’- (a bit of a cliché) and I will never not want to be disabled because without #CerebralPalsy I would be a different person (and another). However, sometimes I can’t help to think that if my disability wasn’t at the forefront of everything do would the judgements not be as common?

For example, as previously mentioned my CP is pretty visible due to my walking and my speech difficulties, so therefore without knowing me or anything about CP its still prominent that I am disabled. Which is fine, this blog is not about being negative it’s just about making people aware that even though I don’t get down about the stereotypes it still doesn’t mean that they aren’t there. With my disability being to prominent to judgements are certaonly more common and people do perceive me in a different light and this can be frustrating. I know this has always happened and is always going to happen and even though my disability makes up a big part of my personality there still aspects of my personality that don’t have disability running through it. So I always wonder that if my disability was so prominent would this fraction of my personality come through more?

I am an ordinary 19-year-old that likes to go out with my friends, I know I have to be careful in the nightclubs due to my #Epilepsy; I can still have a good night. In the nightclub, stereotypes tend to happen the most and people have a tendency to think that you’re ‘drunk’ one or ‘high’. Due to these remarks, I feel the need to explain myself, which I know I should never feel the need to justify myself; I would rather people know my situation then think I’m high. The judgement about my CP then doesn’t get to me because I that this can be a completely new situation to people and quite frankly if you can’t get over it I’m not bothered. It’s just the presumption of I’m staggering in a club so I must be high or drunk!

This second assumptions it the one that gets some the most, it’s something that’s been happening for the last 3 years and to be honest I’m not sure that this assumption will ever disappear. At college I studied A-level maths so when asked what I studied I would just say maths and straight away people assumed that I was resitting GCSE maths. Therefore to stop people from assuming I would say A-level maths but then you still get the comments like ‘even I couldn’t do that’. This is because people see the way that I present myself and just automatically think that I have a learning disability and sometimes explai7ing that you don’t have a significant learning disability can feel like losing the battle.

Due to my CP causing mental fatigue I do have slight learning difficulties and I’m not denying that; my learning difficulties just mean that it takes me a little longer to read or write a piece of text that’s all. But still stereotypes are made and I can’t do nothing about this for the time being which I accept; on the e other hand there’s a part of me thinking its 2019! Why is it a big deal that I’m going on a night out? Why is it a shock that I studied A-level maths? I’m not writing the blog to show you how amazing I am and to show you what I can do in spite of my disability I’m writing blog to show you that I’m just an ordinary 19-year-old. I’m aware that the perception of my disability will probably never change. Does it mean that I just sit back and do noting. No, because then how will ever no is they’re not shown? We’re all human we all make judgements that’s life but instead of just ignoring judgements and blocking them lets face them! I’m not saying start world war 3 I’m saying just questions them because no one will get anywhere without questioning! We all get feelings that can’t be help but we will never be able to dig the root of the feeling up if we don’t let it be found.

Thank you for reading, have a lovely Easter weekend!

Georgia

@georgiaaanv

2 people are talking about this
Community Voices

How my Physical Disability can be Perceived

As I am getting older I am becoming more aware of the stereotypes that people make when initially meeting me. When it comes to stereotypes I have mixed feelings, I don’t hate the fact that I get judged because that’s just part of life and everyone gets judged regardless of having a #Disability or not. But its the fact that the judgement comes from such of a little understanding! I’ve always made it pretty clear that I ’embrace being disabled’- (a bit of a cliché) and I will never not want to be disabled because without #CerebralPalsy I would be a different person (and another). However, sometimes I can’t help to think that if my disability wasn’t at the forefront of everything do would the judgements not be as common?

For example, as previously mentioned my CP is pretty visible due to my walking and my speech difficulties, so therefore without knowing me or anything about CP its still prominent that I am disabled. Which is fine, this blog is not about being negative it’s just about making people aware that even though I don’t get down about the stereotypes it still doesn’t mean that they aren’t there. With my disability being to prominent to judgements are certaonly more common and people do perceive me in a different light and this can be frustrating. I know this has always happened and is always going to happen and even though my disability makes up a big part of my personality there still aspects of my personality that don’t have disability running through it. So I always wonder that if my disability was so prominent would this fraction of my personality come through more?

I am an ordinary 19-year-old that likes to go out with my friends, I know I have to be careful in the nightclubs due to my #Epilepsy; I can still have a good night. In the nightclub, stereotypes tend to happen the most and people have a tendency to think that you’re ‘drunk’ one or ‘high’. Due to these remarks, I feel the need to explain myself, which I know I should never feel the need to justify myself; I would rather people know my situation then think I’m high. The judgement about my CP then doesn’t get to me because I that this can be a completely new situation to people and quite frankly if you can’t get over it I’m not bothered. It’s just the presumption of I’m staggering in a club so I must be high or drunk!

This second assumptions it the one that gets some the most, it’s something that’s been happening for the last 3 years and to be honest I’m not sure that this assumption will ever disappear. At college I studied A-level maths so when asked what I studied I would just say maths and straight away people assumed that I was resitting GCSE maths. Therefore to stop people from assuming I would say A-level maths but then you still get the comments like ‘even I couldn’t do that’. This is because people see the way that I present myself and just automatically think that I have a learning disability and sometimes explai7ing that you don’t have a significant learning disability can feel like losing the battle.

Due to my CP causing mental fatigue I do have slight learning difficulties and I’m not denying that; my learning difficulties just mean that it takes me a little longer to read or write a piece of text that’s all. But still stereotypes are made and I can’t do nothing about this for the time being which I accept; on the e other hand there’s a part of me thinking its 2019! Why is it a big deal that I’m going on a night out? Why is it a shock that I studied A-level maths? I’m not writing the blog to show you how amazing I am and to show you what I can do in spite of my disability I’m writing blog to show you that I’m just an ordinary 19-year-old. I’m aware that the perception of my disability will probably never change. Does it mean that I just sit back and do noting. No, because then how will ever no is they’re not shown? We’re all human we all make judgements that’s life but instead of just ignoring judgements and blocking them lets face them! I’m not saying start world war 3 I’m saying just questions them because no one will get anywhere without questioning! We all get feelings that can’t be help but we will never be able to dig the root of the feeling up if we don’t let it be found.

Thank you for reading, have a lovely Easter weekend!

Georgia

@georgiaaanv

2 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Does anyone have anxiety due the their disability?

3 people are talking about this