Jennifer Hoover

@jennifer-hoover | contributor
To learn all I can to help others like me. I am like you just a very slow learner. I'm just below LD in school it was MIMH. I am in Special Olympics ALPs Grad w/ 4 degrees.

What It's Like to Work as Someone With an Intellectual Disability

I have had many jobs in my life. But I have never worked as a dishwasher until I worked at Purdue University. I like working there and all, but the past few months I’ve had tennis elbow. I don’t know if I was lifting things in their dishwasher the wrong way or not. Two months ago, my left arm started hurting and I went to Urgent Care and they told me I had golf elbow. Which anyone can get, but my disability includes benign hypertension which is muscle weakness. But working at Purdue was a good experience for me. I’ve been working since I was 15. I had a few good jobs in my day. I worked in retail for almost 20 years. Some of the guests would get upset when I paused to think for a few minutes on the phone. I know it’s “get the manager” time then. I remember one woman said, “You don’t know what you’re talking about, do you?” No, you don’t understand — I have a disability. It takes me more time to think about stuff. Employers just don’t understand how to deal with people with intellectual disabilities. There should be a manual on how to hire, train, and keep workers with intellectual disabilities. That’s why there’s Special Olympics Athlete Leadership University. Athletes can take different courses to graduate. I have graduated in Communications, Governess, Sports, and Technology. I especially like Communications and Technology — those were the ones I was best at. I have given a lot of speeches over the years to organizations and a few schools. I’m getting to the point that I would like to talk to employers about hiring people with disabilities. They need to take the time to see if the person they hire can do the job right that is given to them. If not, the company needs to hire a job coach so the employee doesn’t need to have someone constantly watching over them. This is what a job coach is supposed to do. When I first worked at Purdue they said I should get a job couch. This was many years ago. I’ve had a few job coaches, but they didn’t really help. In my experience, they just stand there and talk to you and see how you’re doing. I have some friends at work at the dining court that still have a job coach. I noticed when I was in the dish room, a job coach would come in but they would just stand around and watch the workers. They didn’t seem to help them out at all, just asked how their work was going and everything like that. I am trying to look for jobs. I tried applying for unemployment also, because I don’t qualify for SSI. I guess the government doesn’t think I’m disabled enough. I know God doesn’t give you more than you can handle, but dealing with my health insurance is more than I can handle. My only choice is being on Healthy Indiana Plan 2.0. Luckily my mom can help me do most of that. She’s been dealing with that kind of stuff with my grandma. But when my mom and dad pass, my sister and brother are going to have to take over. Luckily my brother works at Area 4 Agency on Aging and knows what he’s doing. I think that it’s time for a change in jobs. I have 20 more years before I can retire. I am a people person; my dad thought I should be a CNA. Based on what I hear from other people, I don’t think I can do that. My handwriting is not good. I have a hard time writing notes. What I’d really like is to just visit with those that are lonely and need someone to talk to. Because I am best at that. I recently applied for an activity assistant job but they wanted you to lift 50 pounds, which I can’t do right now. I told them maybe in a few months. I would love that kind of job. I would have a bunch of ideas about doing different activities. I’ve tried lots of different things to help my golf elbow heal. I use BML muscle rub, copaiba essential oils (on the parts that hurt and as a pill). I should have listened to my doctor and taken anti-inflammatory drugs to let my arms heal. I wanted to see if they could heal on their own. I kept putting ice packs on my arms. I hope I find a new job. But we will see what happens. If you would like your doctor to know more or learn more about people with intellectual disabilities, have them go to this link: Inclusivehealth.SpecialOlympics.Org

Becca R.
Becca R. @beccar
contributor

Please Don't Joke About My (Or Others') Disabilities

Today started like any other day. I got up, went grocery shopping, and then I logged on for my weekly Monday morning virtual crochet group put on by art therapists from a local hospital. While these crochet groups often feel quite relaxing, sometimes the conversation is taken too far. One of the benefits of this virtual crochet group is that there is a private message feature. As I am a “client” of the art therapists in their other art therapy groups, I feel comfortable private messaging one of the art therapists if the conversation begins to make me feel uncomfortable or unsafe. Today, when the conversation started to take more of a COVID and political turn, I messaged one of the art therapists for help. She tried to change the conversation by asking if anyone had any jokes, something that often perks me up and gets me back into engaging with the group. At first, the jokes were lighthearted and in good taste. Then someone in the group who had more of an authority figure over me and who knows I have cerebral palsy, began to tell jokes about “what do you call the man with no arms and no legs who was in a pile of leaves/on a wall/in water/etc.” That made me uncomfortable to the point I messaged one of the lead art therapists. But I wasn’t prepared for what happened next. The last joke this person told was, “What do you call the woman who had one leg shorter than the other? Eileen (I lean)! That made me lose it completely. I am the woman with one leg shorter than the other, and no, it isn’t even remotely funny. My name is Becca. I shut off my video and muted myself but stayed on the video call so I could message the art therapist and get some support. While my emotional support cat sat on me for a while, which was enough to stop me from turning to self-harm in the moment because I felt he was too cute to disturb, when my cat left, I took the chance to self-harm only to be met with him crying outside the door of the room I went in. He did prevent me from harming myself more once I heard his cries and was brought back to reality. Jokes about disabilities usually a) aren’t funny, and b) aren’t in good taste. The person today was mocking me in front of everyone else in the group. I doubt their comments were intentionally targeted at me, but they still hurt. The joke teller thought it was funny to make fun of “Eileen” when they already know my disability plays a huge role in my poor mental health. When this joke was told, I was reminded of my legs being 1/2 inch different in length from each other and 1 full U.S. shoe size different. I was reminded of the extra $40 and run around to get a lift on my shoes so I walk more evenly. I was reminded of the long afternoons at the department stores trying to find shoes as a kid that would fit both my growing feet. I was reminded of the physical and emotional pain I’ve dealt with for the 28 years I’ve been on this planet. It was an uncomfortable and completely unnecessary reminder. While some jokes about disabilities may be OK, most aren’t. I sometimes joke about my disability with my friends and other people I know well enough who are disabled to make some struggles lighthearted, but I don’t ever make disability jokes around people I don’t know well enough and know I won’t offend regardless of whether or not they themselves are disabled. I sometimes joke about not being able to tell if something is level on a wall because I’m tilted when I stand. Leave those jokes to me to tell when I’m comfortable. I will joke about the seven times I’ve had Botox in my leg and how I won’t have a wrinkly calf, hamstring, and back to worry about. Having others comment on how my body functions and looks isn’t OK with me. Life as a disabled person can be hard, and jokes about disabilities from the wrong people can make things harder. Struggling with body image issues and depression surrounding my cerebral palsy and eating disorder is hard enough. I don’t need people using the physiology of my body to make jokes. My name is Becca, not Eileen.

Community Voices

My story about the Working World

inclusivehealth.specialolympics.org

I have many jobs in my life. But I have never worked as a dishwasher until I worked at Purdue University. I like working there in and all but the past few months I've got tennis elbow. I don't know if I was lifting things in there dishwasher the wrong way or not. Two months ago my left arm started hurting and I went to Urgent Care and they told me I had golf elbow. Which anyone can get but my disability is benign hypertension which is muscle weakness.

I've been working since I was 15. But working at Purdue was a good experience for me. I had a few good jobs in my day. I worked in retail for almost 20 years. Would some of the guests would get upset when I paused to think for a few minutes on the phone. I know it's get the manager then. I remember one woman said you don't know what you're talkin about do you. No you don't understand I have a disability it takes me more time to think about stuff.

Employer just don't understand how to deal with people with intellectual disabilities. There should be a manual how to higher, train, and keep people with intellectual disability.

That's why they're Special Olympics Athlete Leadership University. Athletes can take different courses to graduate Communications as an example. I have graduated in Communications, governess, Sports, and technology. I especially like Communications and Technology those were the ones I was best at. I have given a lot of speeches over the years two organizations and a few schools.

I'm getting at the point that I would like to talk to employers about hiring people with disabilities. That they need to take the time to see if they can do the job right that is given to them. If not, the company needs to hire a job coach. So the employer doesn't need to have someone constantly watching over them. This is what a job coach is supposed to do.

I had a few job code just in my day. To me they don't really help you they just stand there and talk to you and see how you're doing. I have some friends at work at the dining court that still have a job coach. When I first worked at Purdue they said I should get a job couch. This was many years ago. I noticed when I was in the dish room in a job coach would come in they would just stand around and watch the workers. They didn't seem to help them out at all. Just asked Heather work was going and everything like that.

There are lots of different things I've tried to help my golf elbow heal. Most of the stuff is from Young Living. Is real homegrown essential oils. Not like the ones you buy in the store. If you want to know more just look young living or message me. I use BML muscle rub, copaiba essential oils (on the parts that hurt and as a pill) . I should have listened to my doctor in taken anti-inflammatory drugs to let my arms heal. I wanted to see if they could heal on their own. I kept putting ice packs on my arms. They would still swell up a lot of the times. It worked out well though. I'm just praying that my new job again.

Twitter Users With Health Conditions Respond to Trump's $750 Tax Bill

On Sunday, the New York Times published an article revealing what it learned from reviewing two decades of President Donald Trump’s past tax returns, which the newspaper obtained from a credible source. Covering his personal and business tax returns, one of the most talked about aspects of what the Times found centers around how much Trump paid in federal taxes in 2016 and 2017 — $750 each year. Exclusive: The Times has obtained tax-return data for President Trump extending over more than two decades. It shows his finances under stress, beset by losses that he aggressively employs to avoid paying taxes and hundreds of millions in debt coming due. https://t.co/gstfYLEe5V— The New York Times (@nytimes) September 27, 2020 The revelation sparked a conversation on Twitter about many of the inequities in the U.S. that allow rich people like Trump (but not just Trump) to pay less on taxes than many average citizens must pay for necessities like rent, food and health care each month. People with health conditions and disabilities took to Twitter to highlight just how expensive health care in the U.S. is by comparing their medical, device and mental health costs to Trump’s $750 federal tax payment. Here’s what they shared : I spent more on antidepressants last year than trump paid in taxes— Christine Vinard (@ChristineVinard) September 28, 2020 ($750 is how much I was quoted for health insurance each month when I was unemployed and had no money coming in.)— Ella Cerón (@ellaceron) September 27, 2020 My wife and I pay $750/month for health insurance — each. And we're happy to have it. Imagine it'll go up dramatically w/out the ACA bc of pre-existing conditions.— Jenna Lowenstein (@just_jenna) September 27, 2020 When I was in middle school, I had a pair that were $1200.— Crutches&Spice ♿️ : Rude For A Disabled Person (@Imani_Barbarin) September 28, 2020 An ER visit costs more than $750— Sam Ghali, M.D. (@EM_RESUS) September 28, 2020 I paid a LOT more than $750 for treatments associated with my chronic illness & Lupus and 10+ pre-existing conditions in 2017 alone. #TrumpIsNotABillionaire https://t.co/CToVgP5baK— Peter Morley (@morethanmySLE) September 28, 2020 One nausea pill during my cancer treatment cost more than the President paid in federal income taxes during his first year in office. This is Donald Trump’s America. And together, we're going to change that. 36 days.— Sima Ladjevardian (@SimaforTX) September 28, 2020 An incomplete list of expenses #NY17 families pay each month that cost more than the $750 Trump paid in taxes:???? Rent???????? Child care???? Health insurance ???? Student loansAs if we needed more evidence that the rich play by a different set of rules than working families.— Mondaire Jones (@MondaireJones) September 28, 2020 As a single mother, teaching part time so I deal with medical issues, with $40k in hospitalizations in 2016, I paid more than $750 in federal income taxes.As a single mother, teaching full time, supporting 2 kids, I paid more than $750 in federal taxes in 2017.Ready to vote.— Elissa Field (@elissafield) September 28, 2020 Not only do I pay more in income taxes per year than Trump – I also pay more than $750 per month for health insurance and prescriptions. I knew when we learned more about his tax returns it wouldn’t be good, but this is beyond comprehension. #TrumpTaxes— Melissa K. (@_tweetmelissa) September 28, 2020

Melissa Razdrih

Lizzo Posts Empowering Video of Her Working Out on TikTok

Lizzo took to TikTok this week with a fat-positive message designed to tell haters to kiss her fitness-infused ass. “Hey, I’ve been working out consistently for the last five years,” she said. “And it may come as a surprise to y’all that I’m not working out to have your ideal body type. I’m working out to have my ideal body type. And you know what type that is? None of your fucking business.” Like lots of fat women in the public eye, it seems everyone, from straight-up trolls to former “Biggest Loser” trainer Jillian Michaels, have something to say about Lizzo’s weight. Some comments are just cruel. Others are presented as (insincere) concern for her health, because obviously you know everything about how someone’s health, diet and exercise habits from looking at them, right? *eye roll* Lizzo directed her message to all of the weight-shamers who want to keep making inappropriate comments about her body, and I am here for it! @lizzoif you’re not a fat shamer… keep scrolling… ok now that all the fat shamers are here ????????‍♀️✨♬ Buttercup – Jack Stauber   However, these things don’t occur in a vacuum. In fact, the hierarchy of bodies (thin = good and healthy, fat = bad and unhealthy) has been a tool of patriarchal white supremacy and oppression for hundreds of years, even going back to renaissance times. And in that context, the fact that Lizzo even felt she needed to make a video like this makes for an interesting discussion on body politics and the policing of Black and brown bodies. If this is the first time you are hearing about body politics, let me explain the concept. Body politics is the notion that body size, shape, color, sex organs and reproduction have shifted to become political issues in recent times as a tool of marginalization. For instance, concepts like birth control, acceptance of gender identity, hair and clothing styles have all moved into a discussion of public policy, legislation and business ethics. This is by design, as European ideals of what makes up a “normal body” continue to designate status and power at a societal level. Second clarification, I can’t speak for Lizzo or Black women, nor do I want to. I’m a fat Latinx woman, living in my brown body, and I can only speak to my experience and my admiration for Lizzo’s cool response in the face of national conversation around her weight that shouldn’t be happening in the first place. As a non-Black person of color, body politics affects me too, and that’s why I wanted to speak on issues of racism, western ideas and the policing of bodies by patriarchal systemic forces. When we talk about construct of whiteness and euro-centric beauty standards, that “whiteness” part might make you uncomfortable. But it’s true — fat shaming and “health” standards have always been connected to white supremacy. In her book, “ Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fatphobia ,” Sabrina Strings lays out the anchor created between fatness and Black bodies “within the multilayered racial, gender and moral structures that shape fatphobia and thin fetishism.” The heavily researched book’s main point is to show how pro-thin movements throughout history have sealed in euro-centric ideas about race and beauty. Ultimately, these standards serve patriarchal values that oppress minorities, and particularly Black and brown women. These racist beauty standards go beyond policing fatness. In an article by Quartz , Katherine Ellen Foley describes how euro-centric beauty standards can actually lead BIPOC women to use more toxic beauty products. She writes, “Racial discrimination based on European beauty norms can lead to internalized racism, body shame and skin tone dissatisfaction, factors that can influence product use to achieve straighter hair or lighter skin.” The same can be said for using damaging products to try to fit into a slimmer size. There’s another intersection here that ties into ableism. In her video, Lizzo says: So next time you want to come to somebody and judge them, whether they drink kale smoothies or eat McDonalds, or workout or not workout, how about you look at your own fucking self and worry about your own god damn body? Because health is not just determined by what you look like on the outside. Health is also what happened on the inside. “Health” doesn’t have a body type. There are thin people who live with chronic illnesses, and others who gain weight because of the medication that actually keeps them “healthy.” In fact, the fat shaming and systemic marginalization of Black and brown people can cause damaging mental and physical disability among our communities. When Yes Magazine calls fat shaming the “last acceptable bias” what they are really saying is that people who fat shame espouse ideas steeped in racism and ableism, and sometimes they seem happy to do it. Let me be clear, in no way am I comparing the plight of white or white-passing fat folks to the toll racism takes on Black and brown folks. It’s insidious no matter who they choose to levy those comments at, be it Lizzo or Adele . What I am saying is fatphobia is a tool of racism, wielded to keep Black and brown women even more oppressed or used to fetishize us. It’s a cog in the racist machine, and somehow many people have decided it’s OK. The same ideas, steeped in misogyny, are used in legislation about healthcare, the workplace and other important parts of society. This includes clauses that encourage doctors to send fat people home with information about free healthcare counseling without solving the issue they actually came in for. Doctors are more likely to assume obesity is the cause of all your problems if you’re fat, and as a result they might miss an important cancer diagnosis . While issues of malpractice and medical mistreatment impact fat people of all races, Black and brown people are more likely to suffer from the consequences of unequal access to quality healthcare . So, maybe you’re one of those people who thinks, “sticks and stones can break my bones but words will never hurt me.” While Lizzo seems to hold this viewpoint and doesn’t let the haters get her down, the fact that she needed to make a video like this shows how messed up our views of health and wellness really are. R esposting the video on Instagram, Lizzo added in her caption that she didn’t make this video for herself, but for people who get body shamed and don’t have the platform she does. Words shape ideas, ideas influence how we communicate at all levels. Things like job loss, misdiagnosis and even death are consequences of western beauty ideals becoming establishment policy. These circumstances impact all fat people, but guess who they impact the most? Black and brown women , like Lizzo, like myself. Body positivity isn’t going away. Working against anti-fatness isn’t a trend. It’s part of the anti-racist work we need to do. It’s past time to let go of fat bias. Black women like Lizzo shouldn’t need to defend their body or their health to anyone. As Lizzo says, it’s not your fucking business.

Community Voices

Make a wish for next year 💫

<p>Make a wish for next year 💫</p>
346 people are talking about this
Community Voices

what did everyone ask for Christmas?

#Christmas
like, all I want is a Roku HDand I know I'm not going to get this but I would like to marry my boyfriend.

Community Voices

Make a wish for next year 💫

<p>Make a wish for next year 💫</p>
346 people are talking about this

24 Pictures That Prove PTSD Doesn't Discriminate

Although an estimated 11 percent of veterans from the war in Afghanistan and 20 percent of Iraqi war veterans have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), living with the effects of trauma isn’t an experience reserved for soldiers. From living through a national disaster to surviving a sexual assault, about 70 percent of adults in the United States have experienced a traumatic event at least once in their lives. About 20 percent then go on to develop PSTD — meaning the stress of the event doesn’t fully go away, and affects them still, even years later. This can look like flashbacks and night terrors. Hypervigilance and avoiding triggers. It can result in depression and panic disorder — and can effect any gender, race or age. In honor of PTSD Awareness Month, we wanted to show that PTSD doesn’t have a “look,” so we asked people in our Mighty community to share a picture of what PTSD “looks” like for them. Here’s what they shared with us: 1. “From the age of 5 or 6 until 16, my life was filled with trauma. The flashbacks are harsh, strong and come with no warning. Some days I can’t do things I normally would, I can’t see certain faces or hear certain names. A voice simply being raised sends me into a panic I can’t escape. But one day I hope I’ll be able to overcome all that.” — Cheyenne D. 2. “ Just because I look normal and functioning doesn’t negate the fact that I had nightmares five nights out of seven this past week. Or that there are times when my brain won’t stop panicking, which in turn makes me panic.” — Zafreen J. 3. “ PTSD is debilitating and life-threatening! I’ve gone from being a paramedic to someone who can’t even look after himself. See me out walking and you might think I look fine — but you have no idea of the pain behind that smile.” — Michael G. 4. “I am 29 years old. I have PTSD from being in prison and the gang life. When I was released from prison I was nearly murdered by the gang I was involved in. I have nightmares of that night still and it makes me paranoid. Although that lifestyle is not a part of my life anymore, it still haunts me. My triggers are doors slamming, being in a circle and sometimes gangsta movies. I have flashbacks often. I have learned to use coping skills which does help. I tried [dying by] suicide a few times. Just wanted the pain to stop. I have had a troubled lifestyle growing up as a child. I plan to share my story with millions of people to let them know they are not alone.” — Alan B. 5. “ You can appear absolutely healthy and you’re actually struggling inside.” — Whitney J. 6. “ I have PTSD but I volunteer with other mental health organizations so I feel less alone. It’s hard to get out of my house to go to an event, but connecting with others is well worth it in the long run.” — Liz C. 7. “PTSD can affect anyone. I’ve dealt with it for almost eight years now. PTSD doesn’t mean failure. You can succeed in anything you do even struggling with something as scary as PTSD.” — Maddi J. 8. “ Marriage with PTSD: I spent the first few months of my marriage throwing up in the bathroom from panic and fear because cuddling a certain way would shove me back in the past. It doesn’t have to be a violent action to send you back and it doesn’t have to be a violent memory that is your stressor. Emotional abuse effects people in some confusing ways. Sexual abuse doesn’t look the same for everyone. Cuddling a certain way meant the beginning. It was the signal that things were about to start. Sometimes it makes me so incredibly angry that something so simple was taken away from me. It’s important to communicate with your partner that what they are doing is triggering. It can be something that seems normal and even romantic to them, but someone in your past has twisted it into something horrible. We are still learning together what my triggers are and what to do to help me when I have been sent spiraling.” — Cloe J. 9. “ Yes, I’m young. And no, I haven’t been in the army. Wars aren’t the only traumatic thing in the world.” — Sadie B. 10. “D espite what I can’t do anymore, I’ve learned what I can do. I can be more aware when a friend is in crisis. I can help a friend get help when they want to end their life… I’ve learned to ask for help, and I’ve learned forgiveness. It’s going to be a while before I’m OK again, but I’ll get there.” — Elliott P. 11. “ Living with PTSD is not easy to describe to someone with very little understanding of the subject… often at times I feel foreign in a familiar place and it’s my own doing. I live inside my head way more than I want to. Sometimes I even overthink what I’m saying as I say it — I feel as though I’ve created my own brand of social anxiety and I drown myself in it, why? I’m not sure — I’m still working on that.” — Taye G. 12. “ Me on a bad day vs. me on a good day. On bad days my mind replays my childhood trauma like a movie on loop. I have had experiences where I physically experience what has happened to me. I have panic attacks and trouble controlling my emotions. I can barely function. Good days are rare but they happen. It’s really easy to smile for the camera.” — Kate G. 13. “ I’m 26 and served five years in the army. Most people think my PTSD is military related, but it’s actually from a childhood memory, which then in cause triggers my anxiety of having to please those around me, even if it takes a mental toll on my health. PTSD can trigger a multiple of other mental illnesses and anyone with any illness wants you to know that we’re not different. If we openly tell you about these things, we trust you that much because it’s mentally draining trying to think of how to come out with it.” — Eric R. 14. “It’s easier to let people think you’re fine than to try and explain that you’re having flashbacks. It’s challenging when people don’t take the diagnosis seriously to begin with simply because I haven’t been in a ‘real’ war. My childhood was a silent war and most people don’t know about it. Each day is a war in my head. Some days are easier than others. But I am trying.” — Megan K. 15. “ I am a Muslim woman with PTSD and various physical and emotional disabilities. If I could just show people that Muslims with disabilities exist, that we are just as human as everyone else, I would feel I accomplished something.” — Jackilyn D. 16. “ PTSD is still harder than getting out of that hole with full gear and being out of shape. But every day I work harder and harder to do better.” — Nicholas R. 17. “I’ve had nightmares almost every night for a year since my break up with my ex who was emotionally and physically abusive. I have certain triggers that make it very difficult for me to be around people and show affection and trust others. It’s a daily battle.” — Becci P. 18. “ This is me and my psychiatric service dog. One thing I’d like people to know is that PTSD is not always extreme and violent flashbacks. For me, it presents itself as an extremely exaggerated startle response. Anytime I am startled, my heart rate jumps and I am extremely vigilant. It’s exhausting having my body constantly be on high alert. But I fight on!” — Skyleigh B. 19. “ I knew the consequences when I signed the dotted line, it has been hard adjusting to civilian life.” — Martin C. 20. “ I don’t look like I was abused. I look healthy and happy from the outside. But when you spend time with me on my bad days you can see just how bad my abuser traumatized me.” — Elyse O. 21. “ Trying to keep it together at work. I was hiding in the disabled toilet. I took this photo to reflect on these feelings later, to let the other part of me know it’s OK to feel whatever you feel for no apparent reason, cue PTSD.” — Jenn F. 22. “ I’m doing the best that I can. I don’t need words or solutions. I just need your presence. I need to know I’m not alone. This fight with PTSD is agonizing but I’ll wage this war because even though I’m a beautiful hot mess I’m a warrior.” — Tiffany M. 23. “ My first memory was of being molested at 3 years old, and thus has put me in a box of trauma for the rest of my life. So while I may not be defined by my trauma, it will continue to shape my ideas and actions.” — Donisha Q. 24. “ Diagnosed with PTSD one year ago. I was a volunteer firefighter for 11 years. PTSD — the truth behind the smile” — Jean-Guy P.

Community Voices

Special Olympics

#SpecialNeeds #SpecialOlympics

to those that have special need kids.being in Special Olympics does not mean you're slow. it gives your kid a chance to grow and make friends.in the Special Olympics Indiana. we practically grew up together. now we are having trouble getting younger kids in Special Olympics.if a doctor request that your kid be in Special Olympics then he/she can be. I tell you this cuz Special Olympics changed my life. I would be somebody totally different if I was never in Special Olympics. I probably wouldn't even have the job I have today. I wouldn't be the person I am today. I wouldn't have met the friends I have today. most people with intellectual disabilities just sit on their butts all day and do nothing. I know that's what I would be doing if I didn't have a job. this is where Special Olympics come in play. it gives me something to do and that to get out of the house. It helps to that my mom's involved. if you have a kid with an intellectual disability, LD or doctors note. then you're she can join Special Olympics.