Mrs Judith Doherty

@judithdoherty

Mental Illness Is a Disability, and That’s OK

When I was younger, every time I heard the word “disabled,” I would picture someone who was in a wheelchair. When I became more involved in the disability community the definition of disabled changed. I realized that the word “disabled” incorporated many conditions that were visible and invisible. Today I want to go further than just invisible physical disabilities. I’ve noticed that not many people talk about mental illnesses becoming a disability. Mental illnesses are considered invisible. You can not see if someone has an anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, PTSD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorders, and many other mental illnesses. When you have an invisible disability it can be hard for people to take your condition seriously. Many mental illnesses can dramatically affect how someone functions in the world. Throughout my life, I’ve dealt with depression, OCD, eating disorders, and PTSD. My mental illnesses can sometimes affect my work and limit my activities. When I was in college my OCD impacted my driving ability, it made me consistently late, and it affected my relationships. My PTSD can stop me in my tracks. Flashbacks can hold me hostage. My mental illnesses are a disability. They make me disabled and that’s OK to say. Using the word disabled to explain how my mental state affects me can be very helpful when describing to others what I go through. So what defines being disabled? The dictionary definition of a disability is:1) A physical or mental condition that limits a person’s movements, senses, or activities.2) A disadvantage or handicap, especially one imposed or recognized by the law. Stop gatekeeping the word disabled. The disabled identity can be extremely important when learning how to accept your limitations. Those with a mental illness need to be able to identify with the word disabled. We have to be careful when gatekeeping the word disabled. The word disabled doesn’t mean that someone is unable to work due to a disability. It also doesn’t mean that you have to have a physical disability. Many disabilities are invisible, including mental illnesses. You can still be disabled even if you don’t receive disability payments from the government. The keywords in the definition of disability are that a disability can be “a physical or mental condition.”  While part of the definition suggests that a disability can be recognized by the law such as receiving disability pay, that doesn’t mean that if you do not receive disability from the government, you are not disabled. Certain mental illnesses fall under this category, as they can be debilitating and can significantly affect someone’s life. While some people who have a disability rely on government aid due to not being able to work, not all disabled individuals are on disability aid. Many are still able to work but their mental condition limits them. Mental illnesses can affect relationships both romantically and socially, such as an anxiety disorder that prevents someone from being able to socialize and causes severe stress. Since I’ve started referring to my mental illnesses as a disability, it has helped me give words to what I go through and how my mental illnesses can be disabling. I can explain to others why I’m having a hard day. I can ask for accommodations if needed. Claiming the word “disabled” empowers me.

Community Voices

Marginalised by society.

<p>Marginalised by society.</p>
10 people are talking about this
Sam K.
Sam K. @sam_i_am
contributor

What a Breakup Feels Like When You Have Bipolar Disorder

It’s not easy feeling so intensely. I try to pull back. I try to not feel this way. If I could feel less, maybe I would. They give me drugs that supposedly help me to feel less. I’ve been on drugs that do that even more, but it’s hard to go back to black and white once you’ve seen a rainbow. So you try to find a balance that still lets you enjoy life without letting it swallow you whole. To everyone who reached out, I can’t thank you enough. I’m sorry to keep doing this to you. It feels like it happens far too often. I don’t want to be the boy who cried wolf. This isn’t some act. This isn’t some overdramatization. It’s hard to feel like you want to die when someone breaks your heart. It’s hard to share with others that you care about someone in a way that you feel ashamed to feel. It’s hard to feel like folks won’t be as happy about it as you are. It’s hard to know they’re trying to look out for you, but it only makes you feel more isolated because they don’t understand how this girl is different. It’s hard to understand exactly where they’re coming from and begin to question your own passion for someone. It’s hard to feel like you’re crazy… But sometimes, I think we need to be “crazy.” We need to reach outside the borders of what we’re told we should do or how we should feel. That’s the good stuff. It’s the best parts of life. Not everyone can even see past the horizon, and for those of us who can and dare to color outside the lines, it can be amazing. But those lines exist for a reason, and the world outside them is dangerous, too. It’s so alive and exciting, but it can also hurt like hell. I think a lot of you get that and understand it. In fact, I think the ones that tell me I shouldn’t feel that way are the ones who understand it the most. You dared to dream, but maybe it didn’t work out like you’d hoped. You’re trying to save me from that pain. It’s funny how often we tell others how to feel or how to act in order to protect them from our own pain. I do that, too, sometimes. I don’t know what to tell people in those situations anymore. Like Icarus, we want to fly to incredible heights, but we forget that if we fly too close to the sun — if we see too far — our wings will melt, and we’ll fall back to earth like a ball of fire. But do not forget that we had those great wings, that we are capable of rising like the phoenix from the ash. I think that is the difference. Those who dare to fly into the sun again are so brave. They know the risk. They know how much it will hurt if they crash into the ground, for they have lived that life. But is not the sun worth it? Is not its warm embrace beyond anything else we feel? And perhaps the only way to learn how to find that balance is to be willing to step into its warmth once again… I felt so lost this morning, wishing yesterday was just a bad dream. I felt so incredibly lonely when I woke up. For the past few weeks, do you know how incredible I felt? It was the most amazing feeling. I was Icarus before the fall. I felt like I had just started the rest of my life. I felt like I had one thing checked off that I knew was gonna be forever. I had a reason to wake up. And not just wake up, but jump out of bed! I was excited for life in a way that I haven’t been in years. She was my hope for a better future. And this morning is the first time I’ve woken up since meeting her that I don’t have that hope anymore. And it is crushing. I thought I was over the worst of it, but I feel like I’m slipping back into it. I just feel awful. I feel so fucking lonely. I used to love that feeling of serenity in the morning before everyone else had woken up because that peaceful, silent world was mine and mine alone to enjoy. But now it just reminds me of how beautiful she looked curled up on her side, her beautiful curves rising and falling like the green Carolina hills from whence she came… I guess it’s good that time makes us forget. In time, I’ll forget how good it can feel. But right now, I remember. There’s a bullshit mentality of “we shouldn’t be going so fast” that society beats into our little heads to beat back our hearts so that we don’t get hurt so much. Well, y’know what? It’s dumb. Those are the greatest loves. And the greatest heartbreaks. But as shitty as I feel, this has only reinforced the idea that it’s absolutely critical to love with all your heart when the right person presents themselves. I don’t feel this way about just anyone. And honestly, I don’t want to be with someone that doesn’t bring that out in me. I know how much I can feel for someone. I know the possibility of how much I will want to give them. I don’t want to put up with a half-love. I want the full thing. And if that flies in the face of what everyone else tells me, then fuck it. If it means I break my heart to the point of wanting to die, that’s a risk that I’m willing to take. I don’t regret any of the great relationships that I’ve had, despite the mess and pain that followed. I think my life is richer for those experiences and the love I felt. I’m just saying that if you asked me if I would prefer knowing now that it wouldn’t work or if I’d prefer getting tangled up in her for a year and hurting even worse later…I’d take that year in a heartbeat. Every time. A friend told me that when she looks back on it, she sees how the sadness gives her depth. And how she is grateful to not be a shallow well. Another friend said, “Chase the happy feeling. And do everything in your power to get there. And sometimes it might slip from your grasp, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t keep trying.” I believe that with my whole heart. I’m gonna continue to chase that happy feeling, even when it gives way to deep sadness. Because I am not a shallow well, I’m a phoenix. So thanks for listening. I’ll be OK. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via frimages

Community Voices

What triggers your bipolar disorder the most?

<p>What triggers your <a href="https://themighty.com/topic/bipolar-disorder/?label=bipolar disorder" class="tm-embed-link  tm-autolink health-map" data-id="5b23ce6600553f33fe98e465" data-name="bipolar disorder" title="bipolar disorder" target="_blank">bipolar disorder</a> the most?</p>
30 people are talking about this
Juliette V.

New Domestic Violence Law in Ireland Criminalizes Psychological Abuse

Psychological abuse is now a criminal offense in Ireland. The Domestic Violence Act 2018, which went into effect on Tuesday, expands the definition of “domestic violence” by offering new protections for victims of “coercive control.” The act defines coercive control as psychological abuse causing fear of violence or serious distress that affects a victim’s daily functioning. Though emotional abuse is hard to spot and can often fly under the radar, experts say it can be just as damaging as physical or sexual abuse. Charlie Flanagan, Ireland’s Minister of Justice and Equality, addressed this fact in a statement made on Jan. 2. He said: For too long, domestic violence has been seen primarily as physical abuse. The new offense of coercive control recognizes that the effect of non-violent control in an intimate relationship can be as harmful to victims as physical abuse because it is an abuse of the unique trust associated with an intimate relationship. The act introduces a number of new measures to the law, including an “extensive but non-exhaustive” list of factors for courts to consider when assessing applications for domestic violence orders as well as safety orders for people who are in intimate relationships but aren’t cohabiting. While most are in favor of the act’s additions to the law, some are worried there won’t be enough resources to execute the changes. “What is promised on paper must be fully resourced to be effective in protecting those affected by domestic violence,” Margaret Martin, Director of Women’s Aid said in a press release last December. “We are concerned that an already over-stretched system will see an increase in demand when the new provisions commence.” Ireland is one of the only countries to have legally expanded the definition of domestic violence to include psychological abuse. According to CNN, similar measures have been taken in France, England and Scotland. According to LegalMatch, a service that connects folks to licensed lawyers, psychological abuse has historically not been recognized as a form of abuse in the United States, especially when there are no accompanying physical abuse symptoms. If you or a loved one is affected by domestic violence or emotional abuse and need help, call The National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233. If you’d like t o connect with a community of other trauma survivors, post a Thought or Question on The Mighty with the hashtag #TraumaSurvivors or answer the question below. What’s your take on the new measures?

Juliette V.

Best Movies to Watch When You're Depressed

When you’re feeling depressed, sometimes all you want to do is crawl into bed and watch a movie. Maybe you’re craving a childhood movie you hold near and dear to your heart even after all these years. Maybe you want to take a break from your own reality and get lost in a fantasy or action film. Or maybe you love certain movies for the relatable characters that can validate your experiences, make you feel less alone and more understood. Whatever kind of movie you’re looking for, we’ve got you covered. We asked our Mighty community to share their “go-to” movie they watch when they are feeling depressed. Did your “go-to” make the list? Tell us in the comments. Here’s what our community shared with us: 1. “Pitch Perfect” “With the music, they are funny, uplifting and empowering. They always lift my mood and make me smile.” — Emma H. 2. “Harry Potter” “[The movies] transport me to a completely different world and I get to take a time out from my life.” — Hannah P. 3. “Moulin Rouge” “The costumes, set, songs, dances — all help to take my mind off things for a bit. Plus, who doesn’t love Ewan McGregor?” — Hope G. 4. “Finding Dory” “ Finding Dory shows me that someone with mental illness can still do great things all while having a great support system.” — Alicia C. 5. “Bridesmaids” “Annie sums up what it is like to feel alone [and] how it can hurt someone. She also [has] depression and her life crumbles while her friends all flourish. Annie is basically the hero, she comes through at the end and I always like to believe that’s how life is.” — Xavier A. 6. “The Hunger Games” “The lead is a powerful female who fights to the death to survive, just to go back to hardship in the districts. Kinda reminds me that things could be so much worse and there is always hope. Bipolar depression is my ‘Hunger Games’ and I am the victor every day I choose to fight.” — Danielle S. 7. “Ratatouille” “No matter how many times I watch it, it just makes me feel so much better and cosy. Not really sure why I like it so much, but it’s gotten me through some tough times.” — Tasha B. 8. “Elizabethtown” “The movie starts off with the main character being fired, dumped by his girlfriend, finding [out] his father died and contemplating/planning suicide… Then as the story unfolds, he begins to find small things that are worth living for, including love of family members that he never met and romantic love! It’s a nice reminder that no matter how far down you fall, there is always hope and things can and will get better!” — Kimberly E. 9. “ Princess Bride” “It is the greatest story ever told. Love, laughter, kindness, murder, mystery and sword fights. Don’t forget the giant rats! It has it all. It just takes me back to a simpler time and keeps me calm.” — Jennifer T. 10. “ National Lampoons Christmas Vacation” “Because no matter how hard life gets, at least it’s better than the many crappy things that happen to Clark in that movie.” — Kim G. 11. “Freedom Writers” “It makes me feel like you can truly make something from nothing and rise against your circumstances.” — Daisy T. 12. “Walk the Line” “My go-to movie when I’m feeling like crap is ‘Walk the Line.’ I have always been a huge fan of Johnny Cash, and this movie does such a wonderful job at telling his story of his battles with depression, addiction and then redemption. It’s so beautiful and inspiring.” — Kristi S. 13. “ Pride and Prejudice” “I love the actors, and of course, the writing. It’s the perfect amount of calming music matched with plot, and it always makes me feel so happy. I think the fact that it takes place in a much simpler time helps as well.” — Tiff K. 14. “Moana” “I love the story of the strong woman who learns to rely on herself. Plus it’s so colorful and the songs are so catchy. It always cheers me up.” — Rachel S. 15. “ The Sound of Music” “I’ve seen it 1000 times and know every word. It’s also so nostalgic because I used to watch it on repeat with my mom and grandma. It’s a beautiful story that touches my soul.” — Kaitlin R. 16. “Twilight” “I like to watch the whole twilight saga when I’m depressed. Regardless of how weird and unbelievable the love story in it is, it cheers me up a bit.” — Lacie J. 17. “Girl, Interrupted” “’ Girl, Interrupted’ is my favorite go-to movie. It reassures me what I am feeling is real and I am not alone.” — Amie L. 18. “Harold and Maude” “I was really depressed in high school and my Ma rented it for me. I fell in love with it.” — Emily S. 19. “Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” “It transports you to another world. It allows you to see that the characters aren’t perfect but that’s OK, and also to never give up hope. I watch it when I get really low and it always helps bring me back up.” — Amy B. 20. “ The Fault In Our Stars” “It’s sad but I think it’s tragically beautiful and it reminds me of a simpler time.” — Jessica S. 21. “ 8 Mile” “Eminem has helped me in so many ways and the story is amazing and the freestyles get my blood racing and make me feel like I’m actually alive.” — Elise L. 22. “Silver Linings Playbook” “It teaches me that we can always overcome whatever we’re going through and even find true love if we keep a positive attitude and see the silver lining.” –Mary J. 23. “Mamma Mia” “All the love, the songs, it just lifts my mood. You can’t not sing along to dancing queen at the top of your lungs!” — Courtney B. 24. “The Emperor’s New Groove” “It’s light-hearted enough that it doesn’t propagate negative feelings. Plus, it’s familiar, and familiarity is what I tend toward the most when depressed.” — Kristy H. 25. “Remember Me” “It gives me the cry I need to let it all out… then continue with being a boss lol.” — Erica L. What movie would you add?

Juliette V.

Best Movies to Watch When You're Depressed

When you’re feeling depressed, sometimes all you want to do is crawl into bed and watch a movie. Maybe you’re craving a childhood movie you hold near and dear to your heart even after all these years. Maybe you want to take a break from your own reality and get lost in a fantasy or action film. Or maybe you love certain movies for the relatable characters that can validate your experiences, make you feel less alone and more understood. Whatever kind of movie you’re looking for, we’ve got you covered. We asked our Mighty community to share their “go-to” movie they watch when they are feeling depressed. Did your “go-to” make the list? Tell us in the comments. Here’s what our community shared with us: 1. “Pitch Perfect” “With the music, they are funny, uplifting and empowering. They always lift my mood and make me smile.” — Emma H. 2. “Harry Potter” “[The movies] transport me to a completely different world and I get to take a time out from my life.” — Hannah P. 3. “Moulin Rouge” “The costumes, set, songs, dances — all help to take my mind off things for a bit. Plus, who doesn’t love Ewan McGregor?” — Hope G. 4. “Finding Dory” “ Finding Dory shows me that someone with mental illness can still do great things all while having a great support system.” — Alicia C. 5. “Bridesmaids” “Annie sums up what it is like to feel alone [and] how it can hurt someone. She also [has] depression and her life crumbles while her friends all flourish. Annie is basically the hero, she comes through at the end and I always like to believe that’s how life is.” — Xavier A. 6. “The Hunger Games” “The lead is a powerful female who fights to the death to survive, just to go back to hardship in the districts. Kinda reminds me that things could be so much worse and there is always hope. Bipolar depression is my ‘Hunger Games’ and I am the victor every day I choose to fight.” — Danielle S. 7. “Ratatouille” “No matter how many times I watch it, it just makes me feel so much better and cosy. Not really sure why I like it so much, but it’s gotten me through some tough times.” — Tasha B. 8. “Elizabethtown” “The movie starts off with the main character being fired, dumped by his girlfriend, finding [out] his father died and contemplating/planning suicide… Then as the story unfolds, he begins to find small things that are worth living for, including love of family members that he never met and romantic love! It’s a nice reminder that no matter how far down you fall, there is always hope and things can and will get better!” — Kimberly E. 9. “ Princess Bride” “It is the greatest story ever told. Love, laughter, kindness, murder, mystery and sword fights. Don’t forget the giant rats! It has it all. It just takes me back to a simpler time and keeps me calm.” — Jennifer T. 10. “ National Lampoons Christmas Vacation” “Because no matter how hard life gets, at least it’s better than the many crappy things that happen to Clark in that movie.” — Kim G. 11. “Freedom Writers” “It makes me feel like you can truly make something from nothing and rise against your circumstances.” — Daisy T. 12. “Walk the Line” “My go-to movie when I’m feeling like crap is ‘Walk the Line.’ I have always been a huge fan of Johnny Cash, and this movie does such a wonderful job at telling his story of his battles with depression, addiction and then redemption. It’s so beautiful and inspiring.” — Kristi S. 13. “ Pride and Prejudice” “I love the actors, and of course, the writing. It’s the perfect amount of calming music matched with plot, and it always makes me feel so happy. I think the fact that it takes place in a much simpler time helps as well.” — Tiff K. 14. “Moana” “I love the story of the strong woman who learns to rely on herself. Plus it’s so colorful and the songs are so catchy. It always cheers me up.” — Rachel S. 15. “ The Sound of Music” “I’ve seen it 1000 times and know every word. It’s also so nostalgic because I used to watch it on repeat with my mom and grandma. It’s a beautiful story that touches my soul.” — Kaitlin R. 16. “Twilight” “I like to watch the whole twilight saga when I’m depressed. Regardless of how weird and unbelievable the love story in it is, it cheers me up a bit.” — Lacie J. 17. “Girl, Interrupted” “’ Girl, Interrupted’ is my favorite go-to movie. It reassures me what I am feeling is real and I am not alone.” — Amie L. 18. “Harold and Maude” “I was really depressed in high school and my Ma rented it for me. I fell in love with it.” — Emily S. 19. “Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” “It transports you to another world. It allows you to see that the characters aren’t perfect but that’s OK, and also to never give up hope. I watch it when I get really low and it always helps bring me back up.” — Amy B. 20. “ The Fault In Our Stars” “It’s sad but I think it’s tragically beautiful and it reminds me of a simpler time.” — Jessica S. 21. “ 8 Mile” “Eminem has helped me in so many ways and the story is amazing and the freestyles get my blood racing and make me feel like I’m actually alive.” — Elise L. 22. “Silver Linings Playbook” “It teaches me that we can always overcome whatever we’re going through and even find true love if we keep a positive attitude and see the silver lining.” –Mary J. 23. “Mamma Mia” “All the love, the songs, it just lifts my mood. You can’t not sing along to dancing queen at the top of your lungs!” — Courtney B. 24. “The Emperor’s New Groove” “It’s light-hearted enough that it doesn’t propagate negative feelings. Plus, it’s familiar, and familiarity is what I tend toward the most when depressed.” — Kristy H. 25. “Remember Me” “It gives me the cry I need to let it all out… then continue with being a boss lol.” — Erica L. What movie would you add?

Juliette V.

Best Movies to Watch When You're Depressed

When you’re feeling depressed, sometimes all you want to do is crawl into bed and watch a movie. Maybe you’re craving a childhood movie you hold near and dear to your heart even after all these years. Maybe you want to take a break from your own reality and get lost in a fantasy or action film. Or maybe you love certain movies for the relatable characters that can validate your experiences, make you feel less alone and more understood. Whatever kind of movie you’re looking for, we’ve got you covered. We asked our Mighty community to share their “go-to” movie they watch when they are feeling depressed. Did your “go-to” make the list? Tell us in the comments. Here’s what our community shared with us: 1. “Pitch Perfect” “With the music, they are funny, uplifting and empowering. They always lift my mood and make me smile.” — Emma H. 2. “Harry Potter” “[The movies] transport me to a completely different world and I get to take a time out from my life.” — Hannah P. 3. “Moulin Rouge” “The costumes, set, songs, dances — all help to take my mind off things for a bit. Plus, who doesn’t love Ewan McGregor?” — Hope G. 4. “Finding Dory” “ Finding Dory shows me that someone with mental illness can still do great things all while having a great support system.” — Alicia C. 5. “Bridesmaids” “Annie sums up what it is like to feel alone [and] how it can hurt someone. She also [has] depression and her life crumbles while her friends all flourish. Annie is basically the hero, she comes through at the end and I always like to believe that’s how life is.” — Xavier A. 6. “The Hunger Games” “The lead is a powerful female who fights to the death to survive, just to go back to hardship in the districts. Kinda reminds me that things could be so much worse and there is always hope. Bipolar depression is my ‘Hunger Games’ and I am the victor every day I choose to fight.” — Danielle S. 7. “Ratatouille” “No matter how many times I watch it, it just makes me feel so much better and cosy. Not really sure why I like it so much, but it’s gotten me through some tough times.” — Tasha B. 8. “Elizabethtown” “The movie starts off with the main character being fired, dumped by his girlfriend, finding [out] his father died and contemplating/planning suicide… Then as the story unfolds, he begins to find small things that are worth living for, including love of family members that he never met and romantic love! It’s a nice reminder that no matter how far down you fall, there is always hope and things can and will get better!” — Kimberly E. 9. “ Princess Bride” “It is the greatest story ever told. Love, laughter, kindness, murder, mystery and sword fights. Don’t forget the giant rats! It has it all. It just takes me back to a simpler time and keeps me calm.” — Jennifer T. 10. “ National Lampoons Christmas Vacation” “Because no matter how hard life gets, at least it’s better than the many crappy things that happen to Clark in that movie.” — Kim G. 11. “Freedom Writers” “It makes me feel like you can truly make something from nothing and rise against your circumstances.” — Daisy T. 12. “Walk the Line” “My go-to movie when I’m feeling like crap is ‘Walk the Line.’ I have always been a huge fan of Johnny Cash, and this movie does such a wonderful job at telling his story of his battles with depression, addiction and then redemption. It’s so beautiful and inspiring.” — Kristi S. 13. “ Pride and Prejudice” “I love the actors, and of course, the writing. It’s the perfect amount of calming music matched with plot, and it always makes me feel so happy. I think the fact that it takes place in a much simpler time helps as well.” — Tiff K. 14. “Moana” “I love the story of the strong woman who learns to rely on herself. Plus it’s so colorful and the songs are so catchy. It always cheers me up.” — Rachel S. 15. “ The Sound of Music” “I’ve seen it 1000 times and know every word. It’s also so nostalgic because I used to watch it on repeat with my mom and grandma. It’s a beautiful story that touches my soul.” — Kaitlin R. 16. “Twilight” “I like to watch the whole twilight saga when I’m depressed. Regardless of how weird and unbelievable the love story in it is, it cheers me up a bit.” — Lacie J. 17. “Girl, Interrupted” “’ Girl, Interrupted’ is my favorite go-to movie. It reassures me what I am feeling is real and I am not alone.” — Amie L. 18. “Harold and Maude” “I was really depressed in high school and my Ma rented it for me. I fell in love with it.” — Emily S. 19. “Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” “It transports you to another world. It allows you to see that the characters aren’t perfect but that’s OK, and also to never give up hope. I watch it when I get really low and it always helps bring me back up.” — Amy B. 20. “ The Fault In Our Stars” “It’s sad but I think it’s tragically beautiful and it reminds me of a simpler time.” — Jessica S. 21. “ 8 Mile” “Eminem has helped me in so many ways and the story is amazing and the freestyles get my blood racing and make me feel like I’m actually alive.” — Elise L. 22. “Silver Linings Playbook” “It teaches me that we can always overcome whatever we’re going through and even find true love if we keep a positive attitude and see the silver lining.” –Mary J. 23. “Mamma Mia” “All the love, the songs, it just lifts my mood. You can’t not sing along to dancing queen at the top of your lungs!” — Courtney B. 24. “The Emperor’s New Groove” “It’s light-hearted enough that it doesn’t propagate negative feelings. Plus, it’s familiar, and familiarity is what I tend toward the most when depressed.” — Kristy H. 25. “Remember Me” “It gives me the cry I need to let it all out… then continue with being a boss lol.” — Erica L. What movie would you add?