Leslie A. Zukor

@leslieazukor | contributor
Mighty LeaderSuper Contributor
I am a neurodivergent disability journalist and mental health advocate, whose writing occupies the intersection of current affairs, disability and mental illness, and cultural issues. I host the weekly workshop, "Navigating PTSD." My academic training is in Anthropology; I have a Bachelor's of Arts from Reed College in Portland, Oregon. My hobbies include politics, puppetry, and watching baseball. Fun factoid: I love squirrels! NB: I only accept chats from people whose names I recognize.
Leslie A. Zukor

President Biden Relaunches 'Cancer Moonshot' Program

On February 3, 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden relaunched the White House’s “Cancer Moonshot” program, with the goal of developing innovative new treatments for the disease, as well as eradicating it altogether. The objective is bold, namely, to reduce the cancer death rate by at least 50 percent over the next 25 years. Biden had initially spearheaded the effort in 2016 after the death of his son Beau to brain cancer at age 46. The original initiative was funded at 1.8 billion dollars over a seven-year period. 400 million dollars of the original amount is still scheduled to be distributed over 2022 and 2023. While the current rededication does not come with the allocation of new funds, Biden is overseeing the creation of a “Cancer Cabinet.” This collaboration is composed of representatives from the departments of Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, Defense, Energy and Agriculture, in addition to the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, and other members of the executive branch. It will better coordinate efforts at fighting the disease. Biden, who made a vow in 2016 to cure cancer, urged Congress to allocate funds to his new Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H), which spearheads innovation in treating it, as well as Alzheimer’s. According to a White House official, mRNA technology, which was integral to the COVID-19 vaccines by Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and others, holds promise in combating cancer. In addition to its current efforts, the White House will also host a Cancer Moonshot Summit, “bringing together agency leadership, patient organizations, biopharmaceutical companies, the research, public health, and healthcare communities and more to highlight innovation, progress and new commitments toward ending cancer as we know it.” In the fight to cure cancer, the Biden administration wants to be held accountable. It launched the Cancer Moonshot website, where Americans can check the progress of the initiative, as well as share their stories and ideas about combating the disease. In the short term, President Biden emphasized that over 9 million Americans had missed their cancer screenings over the past two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, and urged people to call their doctors to schedule new appointments. “The experience of cancer — of getting a cancer diagnosis, surviving cancer, losing someone to cancer — has touched virtually every American family,” the website read. “This is personal for the President and First Lady, like it is for so many of you.”

Leslie A. Zukor

President Biden Relaunches 'Cancer Moonshot' Program

On February 3, 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden relaunched the White House’s “Cancer Moonshot” program, with the goal of developing innovative new treatments for the disease, as well as eradicating it altogether. The objective is bold, namely, to reduce the cancer death rate by at least 50 percent over the next 25 years. Biden had initially spearheaded the effort in 2016 after the death of his son Beau to brain cancer at age 46. The original initiative was funded at 1.8 billion dollars over a seven-year period. 400 million dollars of the original amount is still scheduled to be distributed over 2022 and 2023. While the current rededication does not come with the allocation of new funds, Biden is overseeing the creation of a “Cancer Cabinet.” This collaboration is composed of representatives from the departments of Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, Defense, Energy and Agriculture, in addition to the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, and other members of the executive branch. It will better coordinate efforts at fighting the disease. Biden, who made a vow in 2016 to cure cancer, urged Congress to allocate funds to his new Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H), which spearheads innovation in treating it, as well as Alzheimer’s. According to a White House official, mRNA technology, which was integral to the COVID-19 vaccines by Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and others, holds promise in combating cancer. In addition to its current efforts, the White House will also host a Cancer Moonshot Summit, “bringing together agency leadership, patient organizations, biopharmaceutical companies, the research, public health, and healthcare communities and more to highlight innovation, progress and new commitments toward ending cancer as we know it.” In the fight to cure cancer, the Biden administration wants to be held accountable. It launched the Cancer Moonshot website, where Americans can check the progress of the initiative, as well as share their stories and ideas about combating the disease. In the short term, President Biden emphasized that over 9 million Americans had missed their cancer screenings over the past two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, and urged people to call their doctors to schedule new appointments. “The experience of cancer — of getting a cancer diagnosis, surviving cancer, losing someone to cancer — has touched virtually every American family,” the website read. “This is personal for the President and First Lady, like it is for so many of you.”

Leslie A. Zukor

The 'No Surprises Act' -- What You Need to Know

On January 1, the federal “No Surprises Act” took effect in the United States. The statute protects patients when receiving emergency care, non-emergency care from out-of-network providers at in-network sites, and air-ambulance care from out-of-network providers. Under the act, physicians are required to give disclosure about protections against balance billing — namely, passing the difference between what the doctor charged and the insurance company paid onto the patient — to everyone enrolled in commercial health insurance. These protections were already afforded to those Americans covered by Medicare and Medicaid. The statute also outlines rules about when patients do not consent to post-stabilization care at out-of-network emergency departments, as well as in what cases consent can be sought. Additionally, medical providers are required to give good-faith estimates of costs for self-pay and uninsured patients, as well as information about patients’ rights. If the difference in costs exceeds $400, then the bill can be disputed for up to 120 days after the billing date. “The No Surprises Act is the most critical consumer protection law since the Affordable Care Act,” said Health and Human Services Secretary, Xavier Becerra. “After years of bipartisan effort, we are finally providing hardworking Americans with the federal guardrails needed to shield them from surprise medical bills.” Previously, some states had protections against surprise billing, and the new law supplements — but doesn’t supplant — them. For more information about the “No Surprises Act,” visit the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services website.

Leslie A. Zukor

The 'No Surprises Act' -- What You Need to Know

On January 1, the federal “No Surprises Act” took effect in the United States. The statute protects patients when receiving emergency care, non-emergency care from out-of-network providers at in-network sites, and air-ambulance care from out-of-network providers. Under the act, physicians are required to give disclosure about protections against balance billing — namely, passing the difference between what the doctor charged and the insurance company paid onto the patient — to everyone enrolled in commercial health insurance. These protections were already afforded to those Americans covered by Medicare and Medicaid. The statute also outlines rules about when patients do not consent to post-stabilization care at out-of-network emergency departments, as well as in what cases consent can be sought. Additionally, medical providers are required to give good-faith estimates of costs for self-pay and uninsured patients, as well as information about patients’ rights. If the difference in costs exceeds $400, then the bill can be disputed for up to 120 days after the billing date. “The No Surprises Act is the most critical consumer protection law since the Affordable Care Act,” said Health and Human Services Secretary, Xavier Becerra. “After years of bipartisan effort, we are finally providing hardworking Americans with the federal guardrails needed to shield them from surprise medical bills.” Previously, some states had protections against surprise billing, and the new law supplements — but doesn’t supplant — them. For more information about the “No Surprises Act,” visit the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services website.

Community Voices

How do I deal with perfectionism?

I know that perfectionism can be a #Trauma response, but I still need some tips on how to have more self-compassion. In grad school, if I don't graduate with Honors, then I feel like I am a failure.

Every essay is a life-or-death obsession with me. I know I have hyperfixations with my #Autism , but this goes far beyond that - into territory where I am either perfect or unlovable.

The course I am taking this winter is going to be very difficult. I was wondering if people have tips on how to break myself of my unreasonable expectations - because I simply am not capable of meeting them.

#CheckInWithMe #PTSD #ObsessiveCompulsiveDisorder #MentalHealth #Anxiety

9 people are talking about this
Community Voices

How do I deal with perfectionism?

I know that perfectionism can be a #Trauma response, but I still need some tips on how to have more self-compassion. In grad school, if I don't graduate with Honors, then I feel like I am a failure.

Every essay is a life-or-death obsession with me. I know I have hyperfixations with my #Autism , but this goes far beyond that - into territory where I am either perfect or unlovable.

The course I am taking this winter is going to be very difficult. I was wondering if people have tips on how to break myself of my unreasonable expectations - because I simply am not capable of meeting them.

#CheckInWithMe #PTSD #ObsessiveCompulsiveDisorder #MentalHealth #Anxiety

9 people are talking about this
Community Voices

How do I deal with perfectionism?

I know that perfectionism can be a #Trauma response, but I still need some tips on how to have more self-compassion. In grad school, if I don't graduate with Honors, then I feel like I am a failure.

Every essay is a life-or-death obsession with me. I know I have hyperfixations with my #Autism , but this goes far beyond that - into territory where I am either perfect or unlovable.

The course I am taking this winter is going to be very difficult. I was wondering if people have tips on how to break myself of my unreasonable expectations - because I simply am not capable of meeting them.

#CheckInWithMe #PTSD #ObsessiveCompulsiveDisorder #MentalHealth #Anxiety

9 people are talking about this
Community Voices

How do I deal with perfectionism?

I know that perfectionism can be a #Trauma response, but I still need some tips on how to have more self-compassion. In grad school, if I don't graduate with Honors, then I feel like I am a failure.

Every essay is a life-or-death obsession with me. I know I have hyperfixations with my #Autism , but this goes far beyond that - into territory where I am either perfect or unlovable.

The course I am taking this winter is going to be very difficult. I was wondering if people have tips on how to break myself of my unreasonable expectations - because I simply am not capable of meeting them.

#CheckInWithMe #PTSD #ObsessiveCompulsiveDisorder #MentalHealth #Anxiety

9 people are talking about this
Community Voices

I Feel Like Everyone Hates Me!

I don't know if this is just a neurodivergent thing, but I struggle with a persistent belief that everyone detests me - and that I am just a bother. My grad school classmates don't seem interested in forming friendships, and I only am close with a couple of people at my school. When my Opinion Writing class took a group picture the last day of first semester, nobody bothered to tag me. It made me feel so inferior. Sometimes, I send out requests to connect on social media, but often, people ignore them. It's so painful. #Autism #Trauma #PTSD #Depression #MentalHealth #CheckInWithMe

49 people are talking about this