lucie_mitchell

@lucie_mitchell
Community Voices

If you had one extra hour in your day today, how would you spend it?

<p>If you had one extra hour in your day today, how would you spend it?</p>
57 people are talking about this
Community Voices

How do you recharge your battery when it’s low? #52SmallThings

<p>How do you recharge your battery when it’s low? <a class="tm-topic-link mighty-topic" title="#52SmallThings: A Weekly Self-Care Challenge" href="/topic/52-small-things/" data-id="5c01a326d148bc9a5d4aefd9" data-name="#52SmallThings: A Weekly Self-Care Challenge" aria-label="hashtag #52SmallThings: A Weekly Self-Care Challenge">#52SmallThings</a> </p>
13 people are talking about this
Community Voices

No more coffee, please! I’m up owl nite! 🤣🤣🤣

<p>No more coffee, please! I’m up owl nite! 🤣🤣🤣</p>
13 people are talking about this
Community Voices

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS OF MY CEREBRAL PALSY.

Through the looking glass of my cerebral Palsy has to do with how I see things through my eyes with my Cerebral Palsy. This August 25th I have to make some very hard decisions as far as my Cerebral Palsy is concerned and some of those decisions are if I can remain on my sticks safely or if weather or not my wheelchair will be needed on a more permanent basis. Down to placement.I can honestly say I may shed a tear over these decisions but I will be ok. I always knew it was going to come down to this because as you age your Cerebral Palsy worsens you don't really have control over that. I say it in that context because there is no known cure for Cerebral Palsy. I have been gifted with the fact that I'm still mobile after 46 years , I have been a lot luckier then most children and adults with Cerebral palsy and for that I'm forever eternally grateful.and that is how I see through the looking glass of my Cerebral Palsy with my eyes.

#CerebralPalsy

2 people are talking about this
Community Voices

#CerebralPalsy the one thing you wish caregivers would understand about your condition #CerebralPalsy

This question has crossed my mind a lot and I have to ask you guys this what's the one thing you guys wish your caregivers knew about how you feel about having CP? I think mine would be I know I may seem strong but sometimes I need a break

3 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Song lyrics that give you hope and make you feel good.

Hi, fellow humans. This has probably been a topic in this forum before but it is my first post. I am naked but unafraid.

I heard a song lyric by Brooks William that really resonated with me. It got me wondering what other amazing lyrics are out here that help you get through this beautiful mess called life.

Here's the lyric, "Love is a fortune it cannot be saved, love must be given away. So spare us the sermon, roll up your sleeves, let your life speak through your deeds."

Bless you all on this journey...

5 people are talking about this
Community Voices

When you need a pep talk, where do you turn?

<p>When you need a pep talk, where do you turn?</p>
17 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Would you rather travel by boat, train, or plane? #52SmallThings

<p>Would you rather travel by boat, train, or plane? <a class="tm-topic-link mighty-topic" title="#52SmallThings: A Weekly Self-Care Challenge" href="/topic/52-small-things/" data-id="5c01a326d148bc9a5d4aefd9" data-name="#52SmallThings: A Weekly Self-Care Challenge" aria-label="hashtag #52SmallThings: A Weekly Self-Care Challenge">#52SmallThings</a> </p>
48 people are talking about this

11 Small (But Significant) Things Restaurants Can Do To Improve Accessibility

  The Mighty was born in the Los Angeles area, home of the $18 burger that doesn’t even come with fries — come on, how are you going to play us like that? — but it wasn’t born yesterday; we all know how expensive it can be to operate any business, let alone a successful restaurant . From outfitting the space, supplying fresh foods, staffing back of house and front of house… it all adds up fast. So, perhaps by the time that expensive quote for making a building into a more ADA-friendly one comes into play, it feels like a corner that could be cut with a temporary solution or two. (Not going to say we agree with the mindset; just that, on some level, we get where it may originate.) Which is why, in looking for ways to improve the restaurant experience for disabled customers, we went small: asking our Mighty community , “What small things could restaurants do to better accommodate your disability?” Don’t worry, owners of massive dining chains who are definitely reading this and sweating profusely right now: The answer to making a better disability-friendly space isn’t always “invest big bucks.” Now that you’ve had a moment to exhale, perhaps you could help us out by fixing some of these things up? Here’s our community’s accessibility wishlist:   “ I’d love a quiet room. I get so overwhelmed.” – @fathousewife “I really wish the music wouldn’t be so loud! I love music and want to hear it — but in the background. I hate yelling across the table to have a conversation. I have ME/CFS and fibromyalgia and am very sensitive to noise when I’m trying to have an intimate conversation. It’s really difficult to keep up.” – Wendy L. “Bathroom doors that open easily and allow room for a walker or wheelchair to pass through.” – Ria “Have ramps for those who have a hard time with stairs. I get short of breath and I can’t get around that well.”. – Shannon G. “I wish the tables were about 2 inches taller, or they could add extensions to a regular table. My chair elevates so I can easily sit at tall tables. My grandfather was disabled and had these challenges. He said that he had every right as anyone else to dine out. He sat at an angle which is what I often do, or I knock all the drinks off our table.” – Doug C. “I wish they could make the menu more readable.” – Stephanie T. “Chairs with backs, always!” – Theo “Even some outdoor dining could be safer and more comfortable. Usually the entrance to the deck is through the restaurant. Lights along floors would be so much safer —  for visual [disabilities] and unsteady balance.” – Deanna C. “Padded seats covered in something soft, like not leather or vinyl.” – @kittieluv “We need: better lighting, less busy flooring, less slippy flooring, more menus with allergies on them, and more space around chairs.” – Cindyellen R. “I use a rolling walker and sometimes a wheelchair but I prefer booth seating as I have a hard time moving chairs close enough to the table.” – @mojosmom What’s on YOUR accessibility wishlist? We’d love to hear from you! Log in or sign up for a Mighty account to add to the comments.

Stop Infantilizing Disabled People

This article is for people who mean well, but often do not know what to say or whether or not they are saying offensive things to disabled people. Recently I went to a bar with some friends who aren’t disabled and at the end of the night a woman came up to me, grabbed my arm, and told me that I was “so adorable.” Able-bodied people may not immediately see anything wrong with this “compliment” in this scenario, but at a bar as a woman in a wheelchair, being called “so adorable” is not the “compliment” you may think it is. It is actually viewed as infantilization, which is when an adult is treated like a child. As disabled young adults, we already face an uphill battle to be taken seriously in entering careers and dating spheres, etc., and these comments and actions reinforce our fears. This has happened to me more often than I would like to admit. Despite my two nose piercings and three tattoos, people, primarily feminine-presenting, infantilize me. I was at a department store after a difficult day, my wallet, car keys, cell phone, and tattoos all on display (I am very clearly an adult), but an older feminine presenting person came up to me and said, “Aww, you’re so sweet, where’s your mom?” I remember them reaching out with their hand like they wanted to touch me. I made space between us for two reasons: I did not want them to touch me, and I had so much anger inside of me because I was so tired of not being seen as a human being capable of taking care of myself. I only replied with, “I’m [my age]” and rolled away. This and every other instance of infantilization has ruined each day and resulted in many venting sessions to my friends, family, and therapist. Even in my workplaces, I have had co-workers reach over me, ignore me, and tell me how to use my wheelchair and that I am using it wrong. I think we have a lot of work to do as a society. If you would not say it to someone who is able-bodied in the same situation, don’t say it to a disabled person. If you would not say it to an able-bodied adult, don’t say it to a disabled adult. If you do not know this person, maybe don’t say anything at all. If your “compliment” has the words “someone like you” in it at some point, do not say it. Compliment our outfit maybe, or makeup, or hair. We are not an inspiration for getting out of the house. Lastly, we do not deserve to be treated like children.