Megan Glosson

@megan-glosson | contributor
Mighty LeaderSuper Contributor
Hi, I'm Megan, a Community Leader here at The Mighty who also runs the "BPD Safe Zone" group. I'm very open about my struggles with Borderline Personality Disorder and other mental health conditions because I hope that by sharing my story, I can help erase the negative stigma surrounding mental illness. Besides writing, my daughters are my life. I love board games, traveling, and large quantities of ice cream. You can follow my personal journey at Living On The Borderline, or check out my writing on The Mighty, Thought Catalog, Unwritten, Thrive Global, Moms, and Project Wednesday.
Community Voices

Does this sound like BPD?

<p>Does this sound like <a href="https://themighty.com/topic/borderline-personality-disorder/?label=BPD" class="tm-embed-link  tm-autolink health-map" data-id="5b23ce6700553f33fe98e87d" data-name="BPD" title="BPD" target="_blank">BPD</a>?</p>
16 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Migraine hangover

I hate the post migraine hangover when I'm in such a fog I can't function.
I had plans with a friend to have a picnic with our toddlers today and I don't know if I can manage.

Then my anxiety takes over and I feel like a crap mom. My baby deserves a mom who can function to do all the fun things. 🥺 #Migraine #MigraineBrainFog #Anxiety

3 people are talking about this
Community Voices

Does this sound like BPD?

<p>Does this sound like <a href="https://themighty.com/topic/borderline-personality-disorder/?label=BPD" class="tm-embed-link  tm-autolink health-map" data-id="5b23ce6700553f33fe98e87d" data-name="BPD" title="BPD" target="_blank">BPD</a>?</p>
16 people are talking about this
Megan Glosson

How Roe v. Wade Being Overturned Harms People With Health Conditions

This past Friday, the Supreme Court voted five to four in favor of overturning Roe v. Wade. This landmark court decision from 1973 established the constitutional right to abortion. Now, individual states will get to decide whether or not they will allow abortion. People across the country are experiencing mixed feelings about this perplexing court ruling. However, many people, including the justices who voted in favor of overturning the court’s previous ruling on the matter, are not thinking about the way in which this decision will impact the millions of American women and people with a uterus who live with chronic health conditions. So, here are just some of the people the justices of the Supreme Court of the United States failed to consider when they overturned Roe v. Wade and all but outlawed abortion for over half of the states in our country. 1. The Transplant Recipients Whose Medications Make Pregnancy Problematic Although it is possible for a transplant recipient to get pregnant and carry a baby to term, there are many potential complications. First and foremost, many anti-rejection medications can cause birth defects that would make life unsustainable for the fetus. They can also build up to toxic levels in the fetus’ bloodstream, which can lead to other complications. Although there are some medications that are safe for the fetus, any change in immunosuppressants must be made gradually so doctors can measure if these medications are actually doing their job (because not every medication works for every person). Also, because medication levels are based on weight, pregnancy can impact the medication levels in a way that leads to organ rejection during the pregnancy, making it a life-threatening situation for parent and fetus. 2. The People Whose Autoimmune Disorder Could Cause Complications Many autoimmune disorders cause your immune system to attack healthy tissue. This means that a pre-existing autoimmune disorder can interfere with the pregnancy by harming the fetus. Even if the autoimmune disorder allows the pregnancy to continue, the mother’s antibodies can enter the fetus’s system and disrupt its development and growth. Furthermore, some people don’t even know they have an autoimmune disorder until their pregnancy triggers it. In these cases, a person may find that being pregnant is interfering with their life so much that it’s not possible to continue living while pregnant. 3. Those Who Live With a Genetic Disorder That Could Prove Fatal for the Baby Living with a rare disease is not an easy road. However, some genetic disorders can be fatal, and passing them down to a child can increase the risk of fatality for the baby. These conditions include Huntington’s disease, vascular EDS (vEDS), cystic fibrosis, Marfan’s syndrome, and many other genetic disorders that someone can either have or be a carrier for. Even if the baby makes it through delivery, they will have a hard life (assuming they can sustain life). 4. The People Whose Endometriosis Caused an Ectopic Pregnancy People with endometriosis are twice as likely to experience ectopic pregnancies than the average person. Unfortunately, there’s zero possibility of an ectopic pregnancy becoming viable, no matter what marvels of modern medicine an OBGYN can perform. Usually, ectopic pregnancies are treated with injections that end the pregnancy or surgery to remove the fallopian tube. Either way, these life-saving medical procedures can be considered forms of abortion, and would now be punishable by law in some states. This means that people could face jail time for something completely out of their control just because they chose to save their own life. And without Roe v. Wade, there’s nothing a person can do about it if their state’s court system decides to rule against them. 5. Those Whose Cancer Treatment Would Affect the Fetus Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring type of cancer for women, and breast cancer rates are on the rise for women of childbearing age. Unfortunately, many of the recommended forms of cancer treatment can cause harm to a fetus and are not compatible with pregnancy. There are instances where a pregnant person with cancer can either wait until after their child is born to undergo treatment or select treatment methods that are least harmful to the fetus. However, there are also times when someone may need to decide whether it’s better to end a pregnancy during the early stages so they can undergo cancer treatment, or risk bringing a baby into the world while also dying. It’s not an easy decision to make either way, but the overruling of Roe v. Wade now makes it even more challenging. 6. The People Who Live With Mental Health Conditions That Require Daily Medications There are countless mental health conditions that require daily medications. Some of these conditions include depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. However, even with the wide variety of available medications out there for each and every single mental health condition, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists still says a majority of these medications are not safe during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester. Whether a pregnancy was planned or unexpected, a pregnant person who uses one or more psychiatric medications may be forced to decide whether or not they want to expose their fetus to the risks associated with the medication. In many cases, these medications can cause harmful birth defects or even harm the fetus in a way that makes life unsustainable. Therefore, these individuals need as many choices as possible available to them, including the right to terminate the pregnancy if that’s what they and their medical team feel is best. 7. Those Whose Epilepsy Puts Them At Risk for a Stillbirth Women with epilepsy are up to three times as likely to have a pregnancy that results in stillbirth than women who do not live with epilepsy. Sometimes, there’s no way of knowing whether they will experience a stillborn birth, whereas other times an OBGYN may no longer detect signs of life before the pregnant person even hits the third trimester. Without the option to abort, these individuals will be forced to carry a pregnancy to term even though the fetus will no longer grow and develop. 8. The People Who Almost Died With Their First Baby and Don’t Want to Go Through That Again There’s a lot that is still unknown about how pregnancy impacts the body. Conditions like pre-eclampsia are largely undetectable until it’s too late, as are other rare pregnancy complications. However, people who experience these issues during their first pregnancy are more likely to experience them again. This means a person may take active measures to avoid additional pregnancies. Unfortunately, no form of birth control is foolproof, and a person can still end up pregnant even when actively avoiding it. Should these individuals have to go through the same hell they endured during their first pregnancy if they don’t have to? And is that really someone else’s choice to make? 9. The Trans Man Who Would Struggle With the Dysphoria of a Pregnancy Thanks to the advances in modern medicine, trans men can do many things to counteract the gender dysphoria they experience. However, up to 30 percent of trans men still experience unplanned pregnancies. These pregnancies can lead to depression and other concerns due to the mixture of dysphoria and judgment from society. Before the overturning of Roe v. Wade, trans men could decide whether or not they wanted to go through with a pregnancy. Now that it is overturned, trans men in states with abortion laws in place may have no choice, and this combined with the stigma they likely already face due to society’s general view of the trans community in their geographic location, could cause depression and suicide rates to climb even more. This list isn’t exhaustive. However, it does provide a view into just how many people will be impacted due to the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In many cases, people who live with health conditions are already marginalized and mistreated by medical providers and society as a whole. Now they may face even more problems and harsh judgment just for making decisions that can help them continue to live. This isn’t the type of treatment anyone deserves, especially people who already have to fight for their right to live day in and day out.

Megan Glosson

6 Ways Living With Migraine Can Affect Your Mental Health

When most people hear the word “chronic illness,” they think about all the ways a condition may impact someone’s physical health. For example, when we talk about migraine, people typically think about excruciating head pain, fatigue, nausea, and other physical byproducts of this neurological condition. However, I know that my life with migraine involves so much more than just the physical symptoms I experience and their impact on my day-to-day life. In fact, there are many ways in which living with migraine impacts my mental health. Here are just six ways living with migraine can impact your mental health: 1. Elevated Stress Levels Stress is a common migraine trigger, and living with migraine often causes people stress. So needless to say, stress and migraine have a complicated relationship. Unfortunately, stress can also impact your mental health, which makes the relationship between migraine and stress even more problematic. If you notice that your stress levels are elevated, looking for ways to manage stress may help your physical and mental health. Mindfulness exercises, journaling, and readjusting your goals and expectations for yourself can all help reduce stress levels. 2. Lower Self-Worth We live in a world where so much emphasis is placed on productivity and success. However, when you live with a chronic health condition like migraine, you can’t always push yourself and hustle like your friends and family members — at least not without consequences later on. When we feel like we aren’t equally successful to others, we often feel inadequate or unworthy in some way, and this low self-worth can really take a toll on our mental health. Here’s the thing most of us forget, though: Our worth isn’t tied to the amount of work we do in a given day. We are worthy because we exist. Period. The fact that you live with migraine doesn’t make you any less capable, and it definitely doesn’t make you any less worthy. 3. Increased Depression and Anxiety While the specifics are still unknown, several studies have discovered an undeniable link between migraine and depression. In fact, people with migraine, as compared to people with other types of chronic pain, are more likely to also live with depression. This also holds true with anxiety disorders, although again doctors don’t necessarily understand why. While depression and anxiety are difficult beasts to deal with, they don’t have to ruin your life. Be on the lookout for common depression and anxiety symptoms, and don’t forget to share these symptoms with your doctor so they can help you explore treatment options. 4. Feelings of Hopelessness Unfortunately, migraine is a difficult condition to live with. Doctors still don’t fully understand what causes migraine and there’s often no “cure” for the condition. Because of this, many people with migraine feel powerless and hopeless, and these feelings can severely impact a person’s overall well-being. Although you may feel like the situation is hopeless at times, you can continue advocating for yourself to get the treatment options you need. You can also take advantage of resources like the American Migraine Foundation to help discover resources and treatment options your doctor may not know about. 5. Sleep Disturbances Regardless of what nighttime routines you have in place or what sleep hygiene protocols you follow, there are times when your migraine symptoms can (and do) interrupt your sleep. Like stress, sleep disruptions can also increase your risk for migraine attacks, not to mention the impact that lack of sleep can have on your mental health. It’s tough, but trying to follow a consistent sleep schedule can help somewhat, as can certain medications and non-medical recommendations. You still may experience sleep disruptions due to migraine pain, but if you can take the right steps to treat the symptoms immediately, you may be able to return to sleep and (mostly) net a full eight (or more) hours each night. 6. Increased Isolation When you’re dealing with migraine symptoms, you don’t usually feel up to calling your family members or going out to dinner with friends. Furthermore, many friends and family members don’t seem to always understand how living with migraine differs from everyday headaches most people experience periodically. Combined, these issues can really increase feelings of isolation for people who deal with migraine. Even when you feel most alone and isolated, places like The Mighty exist to help you out. I, like thousands of other people, have found entire communities of people who understand what it’s like to live with chronic health conditions like migraine. It’s a great place to come when you feel lonely or misunderstood because chances are, there’s at least one person out there who has been through a similar situation and can offer empathy and support. If life with migraine just involved the physical symptoms, I honestly think many of us could deal with that. However, these mental health effects make life with migraine much more complicated, especially when our physical and mental health often play off each other. While there’s no magical cure for migraine or any of the fun extras that come along with it, I think understanding just how much your physical and mental health are intertwined can make a world of difference. After all, we can only treat the symptoms of any health condition once we know what we’re dealing with, amiright?

Megan Glosson

How to Talk to Children About Pet Loss

For the past decade, Bruce Wayne has been a fixture in my household. My now ex-husband and I adopted the cat as a companion for our other cat, Sylvia, but he ultimately became so much more than that to our entire household, especially our youngest daughter. Shortly after we adopted Bruce, we noticed that he had some mobility issues. We eventually learned that Bruce has a condition called cerebellar hypoplasia, a condition that is essentially the feline version of cerebral palsy (which our aforementioned daughter has). Needless to say, Bruce and my daughter have been inseparable for most of her life. Unfortunately, Bruce’s health has severely declined in recent weeks, to the point that our veterinarian has said there’s not much more we can do for him. This is the first pet loss my daughter has been old enough to understand, and it’s her “best buddy.” It’s heartbreaking, to say the least. To say it’s been a difficult few weeks for us is an understatement, but I have also viewed it as a learning experience that I can share with others. If you’re also in the midst of explaining pet loss to a child, I hope these suggestions can help. Plan Ahead Unless your pet dies suddenly due to a tragic event, you’ll probably have at least a little bit of time between the news and your pet’s final days. If that’s the case, use this time to get a game plan about how you’ll break the news to your children. If possible, try to break the news to them during a time of day when you’ll be able to comfort them and talk to them at length. Prepare some words to explain the situation to your child in a way that is clear and concise, but also age-appropriate. Try to not “beat around the bush” or use colloquial expressions that may not make sense to a young child. Taking the time to prepare when, where, and how to break the news will make it easier on you and help you communicate what you need to say in a way that your child can understand. Answer Questions Children ask questions to help them understand the world around them. In fact, kids ask us questions about almost every aspect of our lives, and pet loss is no different. Some questions your child may have include: Can we do anything to make our pet feel better? Will our pet feel any pain? Does death last forever? What will happen when our pet dies? What will we do with the pet’s body? Could I have done anything to save my pet? What if I forget about my pet after they are gone? It can be tough to answer every question your child has about their pet’s death. However, answering these questions will help your child process the loss and feel more secure during this difficult time. Use Books as a Guide Sometimes death and grief are complicated topics for children to fully comprehend. However, books can be a great way to present these sensitive topics to children in a way they can understand. Some great books for explaining pet loss to your child include: “When A Pet Dies” by Fred Rogers “The Rainbow Bridge” by Adrian Raeside “I Miss My Pet: A First Look at When a Pet Dies” by Pat Thomas If possible, select several books to read over the course of a week or two before your pet dies. This will help your child prepare themselves and begin to process the loss so they aren’t caught off guard when the time comes. Don’t Forget the Coping Skills Although providing your children with information is important, it’s not the only way you can help your child work through this difficult life event. No matter how much you front-load your child with information, chances are they will still experience emotions like sadness, anger, and grief after this loss. Therefore, you need to provide them with healthy coping skills to deal with these overwhelming emotions. Some coping skills you can teach your child include: Positive reframing Journaling Healthy reminiscing Talking about feelings Distracting with enjoyable activities When your pet is gone, make sure you model these coping skills. This will help your child remember to use them as well, and can even make your grieving process a family bonding experience. Dealing with the loss of a beloved family pet is not easy. However, it can be especially difficult for children who have never experienced this type of loss before. Just remember that grieving the loss of a loved one takes time, and do what you can to support your child along the way. Eventually, your family will make it to the other side.

Megan Glosson

How Roe v. Wade Being Overturned Harms People With Health Conditions

This past Friday, the Supreme Court voted five to four in favor of overturning Roe v. Wade. This landmark court decision from 1973 established the constitutional right to abortion. Now, individual states will get to decide whether or not they will allow abortion. People across the country are experiencing mixed feelings about this perplexing court ruling. However, many people, including the justices who voted in favor of overturning the court’s previous ruling on the matter, are not thinking about the way in which this decision will impact the millions of American women and people with a uterus who live with chronic health conditions. So, here are just some of the people the justices of the Supreme Court of the United States failed to consider when they overturned Roe v. Wade and all but outlawed abortion for over half of the states in our country. 1. The Transplant Recipients Whose Medications Make Pregnancy Problematic Although it is possible for a transplant recipient to get pregnant and carry a baby to term, there are many potential complications. First and foremost, many anti-rejection medications can cause birth defects that would make life unsustainable for the fetus. They can also build up to toxic levels in the fetus’ bloodstream, which can lead to other complications. Although there are some medications that are safe for the fetus, any change in immunosuppressants must be made gradually so doctors can measure if these medications are actually doing their job (because not every medication works for every person). Also, because medication levels are based on weight, pregnancy can impact the medication levels in a way that leads to organ rejection during the pregnancy, making it a life-threatening situation for parent and fetus. 2. The People Whose Autoimmune Disorder Could Cause Complications Many autoimmune disorders cause your immune system to attack healthy tissue. This means that a pre-existing autoimmune disorder can interfere with the pregnancy by harming the fetus. Even if the autoimmune disorder allows the pregnancy to continue, the mother’s antibodies can enter the fetus’s system and disrupt its development and growth. Furthermore, some people don’t even know they have an autoimmune disorder until their pregnancy triggers it. In these cases, a person may find that being pregnant is interfering with their life so much that it’s not possible to continue living while pregnant. 3. Those Who Live With a Genetic Disorder That Could Prove Fatal for the Baby Living with a rare disease is not an easy road. However, some genetic disorders can be fatal, and passing them down to a child can increase the risk of fatality for the baby. These conditions include Huntington’s disease, vascular EDS (vEDS), cystic fibrosis, Marfan’s syndrome, and many other genetic disorders that someone can either have or be a carrier for. Even if the baby makes it through delivery, they will have a hard life (assuming they can sustain life). 4. The People Whose Endometriosis Caused an Ectopic Pregnancy People with endometriosis are twice as likely to experience ectopic pregnancies than the average person. Unfortunately, there’s zero possibility of an ectopic pregnancy becoming viable, no matter what marvels of modern medicine an OBGYN can perform. Usually, ectopic pregnancies are treated with injections that end the pregnancy or surgery to remove the fallopian tube. Either way, these life-saving medical procedures can be considered forms of abortion, and would now be punishable by law in some states. This means that people could face jail time for something completely out of their control just because they chose to save their own life. And without Roe v. Wade, there’s nothing a person can do about it if their state’s court system decides to rule against them. 5. Those Whose Cancer Treatment Would Affect the Fetus Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring type of cancer for women, and breast cancer rates are on the rise for women of childbearing age. Unfortunately, many of the recommended forms of cancer treatment can cause harm to a fetus and are not compatible with pregnancy. There are instances where a pregnant person with cancer can either wait until after their child is born to undergo treatment or select treatment methods that are least harmful to the fetus. However, there are also times when someone may need to decide whether it’s better to end a pregnancy during the early stages so they can undergo cancer treatment, or risk bringing a baby into the world while also dying. It’s not an easy decision to make either way, but the overruling of Roe v. Wade now makes it even more challenging. 6. The People Who Live With Mental Health Conditions That Require Daily Medications There are countless mental health conditions that require daily medications. Some of these conditions include depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. However, even with the wide variety of available medications out there for each and every single mental health condition, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists still says a majority of these medications are not safe during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester. Whether a pregnancy was planned or unexpected, a pregnant person who uses one or more psychiatric medications may be forced to decide whether or not they want to expose their fetus to the risks associated with the medication. In many cases, these medications can cause harmful birth defects or even harm the fetus in a way that makes life unsustainable. Therefore, these individuals need as many choices as possible available to them, including the right to terminate the pregnancy if that’s what they and their medical team feel is best. 7. Those Whose Epilepsy Puts Them At Risk for a Stillbirth Women with epilepsy are up to three times as likely to have a pregnancy that results in stillbirth than women who do not live with epilepsy. Sometimes, there’s no way of knowing whether they will experience a stillborn birth, whereas other times an OBGYN may no longer detect signs of life before the pregnant person even hits the third trimester. Without the option to abort, these individuals will be forced to carry a pregnancy to term even though the fetus will no longer grow and develop. 8. The People Who Almost Died With Their First Baby and Don’t Want to Go Through That Again There’s a lot that is still unknown about how pregnancy impacts the body. Conditions like pre-eclampsia are largely undetectable until it’s too late, as are other rare pregnancy complications. However, people who experience these issues during their first pregnancy are more likely to experience them again. This means a person may take active measures to avoid additional pregnancies. Unfortunately, no form of birth control is foolproof, and a person can still end up pregnant even when actively avoiding it. Should these individuals have to go through the same hell they endured during their first pregnancy if they don’t have to? And is that really someone else’s choice to make? 9. The Trans Man Who Would Struggle With the Dysphoria of a Pregnancy Thanks to the advances in modern medicine, trans men can do many things to counteract the gender dysphoria they experience. However, up to 30 percent of trans men still experience unplanned pregnancies. These pregnancies can lead to depression and other concerns due to the mixture of dysphoria and judgment from society. Before the overturning of Roe v. Wade, trans men could decide whether or not they wanted to go through with a pregnancy. Now that it is overturned, trans men in states with abortion laws in place may have no choice, and this combined with the stigma they likely already face due to society’s general view of the trans community in their geographic location, could cause depression and suicide rates to climb even more. This list isn’t exhaustive. However, it does provide a view into just how many people will be impacted due to the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In many cases, people who live with health conditions are already marginalized and mistreated by medical providers and society as a whole. Now they may face even more problems and harsh judgment just for making decisions that can help them continue to live. This isn’t the type of treatment anyone deserves, especially people who already have to fight for their right to live day in and day out.

Megan Glosson

How Roe v. Wade Being Overturned Harms People With Health Conditions

This past Friday, the Supreme Court voted five to four in favor of overturning Roe v. Wade. This landmark court decision from 1973 established the constitutional right to abortion. Now, individual states will get to decide whether or not they will allow abortion. People across the country are experiencing mixed feelings about this perplexing court ruling. However, many people, including the justices who voted in favor of overturning the court’s previous ruling on the matter, are not thinking about the way in which this decision will impact the millions of American women and people with a uterus who live with chronic health conditions. So, here are just some of the people the justices of the Supreme Court of the United States failed to consider when they overturned Roe v. Wade and all but outlawed abortion for over half of the states in our country. 1. The Transplant Recipients Whose Medications Make Pregnancy Problematic Although it is possible for a transplant recipient to get pregnant and carry a baby to term, there are many potential complications. First and foremost, many anti-rejection medications can cause birth defects that would make life unsustainable for the fetus. They can also build up to toxic levels in the fetus’ bloodstream, which can lead to other complications. Although there are some medications that are safe for the fetus, any change in immunosuppressants must be made gradually so doctors can measure if these medications are actually doing their job (because not every medication works for every person). Also, because medication levels are based on weight, pregnancy can impact the medication levels in a way that leads to organ rejection during the pregnancy, making it a life-threatening situation for parent and fetus. 2. The People Whose Autoimmune Disorder Could Cause Complications Many autoimmune disorders cause your immune system to attack healthy tissue. This means that a pre-existing autoimmune disorder can interfere with the pregnancy by harming the fetus. Even if the autoimmune disorder allows the pregnancy to continue, the mother’s antibodies can enter the fetus’s system and disrupt its development and growth. Furthermore, some people don’t even know they have an autoimmune disorder until their pregnancy triggers it. In these cases, a person may find that being pregnant is interfering with their life so much that it’s not possible to continue living while pregnant. 3. Those Who Live With a Genetic Disorder That Could Prove Fatal for the Baby Living with a rare disease is not an easy road. However, some genetic disorders can be fatal, and passing them down to a child can increase the risk of fatality for the baby. These conditions include Huntington’s disease, vascular EDS (vEDS), cystic fibrosis, Marfan’s syndrome, and many other genetic disorders that someone can either have or be a carrier for. Even if the baby makes it through delivery, they will have a hard life (assuming they can sustain life). 4. The People Whose Endometriosis Caused an Ectopic Pregnancy People with endometriosis are twice as likely to experience ectopic pregnancies than the average person. Unfortunately, there’s zero possibility of an ectopic pregnancy becoming viable, no matter what marvels of modern medicine an OBGYN can perform. Usually, ectopic pregnancies are treated with injections that end the pregnancy or surgery to remove the fallopian tube. Either way, these life-saving medical procedures can be considered forms of abortion, and would now be punishable by law in some states. This means that people could face jail time for something completely out of their control just because they chose to save their own life. And without Roe v. Wade, there’s nothing a person can do about it if their state’s court system decides to rule against them. 5. Those Whose Cancer Treatment Would Affect the Fetus Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring type of cancer for women, and breast cancer rates are on the rise for women of childbearing age. Unfortunately, many of the recommended forms of cancer treatment can cause harm to a fetus and are not compatible with pregnancy. There are instances where a pregnant person with cancer can either wait until after their child is born to undergo treatment or select treatment methods that are least harmful to the fetus. However, there are also times when someone may need to decide whether it’s better to end a pregnancy during the early stages so they can undergo cancer treatment, or risk bringing a baby into the world while also dying. It’s not an easy decision to make either way, but the overruling of Roe v. Wade now makes it even more challenging. 6. The People Who Live With Mental Health Conditions That Require Daily Medications There are countless mental health conditions that require daily medications. Some of these conditions include depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. However, even with the wide variety of available medications out there for each and every single mental health condition, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists still says a majority of these medications are not safe during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester. Whether a pregnancy was planned or unexpected, a pregnant person who uses one or more psychiatric medications may be forced to decide whether or not they want to expose their fetus to the risks associated with the medication. In many cases, these medications can cause harmful birth defects or even harm the fetus in a way that makes life unsustainable. Therefore, these individuals need as many choices as possible available to them, including the right to terminate the pregnancy if that’s what they and their medical team feel is best. 7. Those Whose Epilepsy Puts Them At Risk for a Stillbirth Women with epilepsy are up to three times as likely to have a pregnancy that results in stillbirth than women who do not live with epilepsy. Sometimes, there’s no way of knowing whether they will experience a stillborn birth, whereas other times an OBGYN may no longer detect signs of life before the pregnant person even hits the third trimester. Without the option to abort, these individuals will be forced to carry a pregnancy to term even though the fetus will no longer grow and develop. 8. The People Who Almost Died With Their First Baby and Don’t Want to Go Through That Again There’s a lot that is still unknown about how pregnancy impacts the body. Conditions like pre-eclampsia are largely undetectable until it’s too late, as are other rare pregnancy complications. However, people who experience these issues during their first pregnancy are more likely to experience them again. This means a person may take active measures to avoid additional pregnancies. Unfortunately, no form of birth control is foolproof, and a person can still end up pregnant even when actively avoiding it. Should these individuals have to go through the same hell they endured during their first pregnancy if they don’t have to? And is that really someone else’s choice to make? 9. The Trans Man Who Would Struggle With the Dysphoria of a Pregnancy Thanks to the advances in modern medicine, trans men can do many things to counteract the gender dysphoria they experience. However, up to 30 percent of trans men still experience unplanned pregnancies. These pregnancies can lead to depression and other concerns due to the mixture of dysphoria and judgment from society. Before the overturning of Roe v. Wade, trans men could decide whether or not they wanted to go through with a pregnancy. Now that it is overturned, trans men in states with abortion laws in place may have no choice, and this combined with the stigma they likely already face due to society’s general view of the trans community in their geographic location, could cause depression and suicide rates to climb even more. This list isn’t exhaustive. However, it does provide a view into just how many people will be impacted due to the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In many cases, people who live with health conditions are already marginalized and mistreated by medical providers and society as a whole. Now they may face even more problems and harsh judgment just for making decisions that can help them continue to live. This isn’t the type of treatment anyone deserves, especially people who already have to fight for their right to live day in and day out.

Megan Glosson

How Roe v. Wade Being Overturned Harms People With Health Conditions

This past Friday, the Supreme Court voted five to four in favor of overturning Roe v. Wade. This landmark court decision from 1973 established the constitutional right to abortion. Now, individual states will get to decide whether or not they will allow abortion. People across the country are experiencing mixed feelings about this perplexing court ruling. However, many people, including the justices who voted in favor of overturning the court’s previous ruling on the matter, are not thinking about the way in which this decision will impact the millions of American women and people with a uterus who live with chronic health conditions. So, here are just some of the people the justices of the Supreme Court of the United States failed to consider when they overturned Roe v. Wade and all but outlawed abortion for over half of the states in our country. 1. The Transplant Recipients Whose Medications Make Pregnancy Problematic Although it is possible for a transplant recipient to get pregnant and carry a baby to term, there are many potential complications. First and foremost, many anti-rejection medications can cause birth defects that would make life unsustainable for the fetus. They can also build up to toxic levels in the fetus’ bloodstream, which can lead to other complications. Although there are some medications that are safe for the fetus, any change in immunosuppressants must be made gradually so doctors can measure if these medications are actually doing their job (because not every medication works for every person). Also, because medication levels are based on weight, pregnancy can impact the medication levels in a way that leads to organ rejection during the pregnancy, making it a life-threatening situation for parent and fetus. 2. The People Whose Autoimmune Disorder Could Cause Complications Many autoimmune disorders cause your immune system to attack healthy tissue. This means that a pre-existing autoimmune disorder can interfere with the pregnancy by harming the fetus. Even if the autoimmune disorder allows the pregnancy to continue, the mother’s antibodies can enter the fetus’s system and disrupt its development and growth. Furthermore, some people don’t even know they have an autoimmune disorder until their pregnancy triggers it. In these cases, a person may find that being pregnant is interfering with their life so much that it’s not possible to continue living while pregnant. 3. Those Who Live With a Genetic Disorder That Could Prove Fatal for the Baby Living with a rare disease is not an easy road. However, some genetic disorders can be fatal, and passing them down to a child can increase the risk of fatality for the baby. These conditions include Huntington’s disease, vascular EDS (vEDS), cystic fibrosis, Marfan’s syndrome, and many other genetic disorders that someone can either have or be a carrier for. Even if the baby makes it through delivery, they will have a hard life (assuming they can sustain life). 4. The People Whose Endometriosis Caused an Ectopic Pregnancy People with endometriosis are twice as likely to experience ectopic pregnancies than the average person. Unfortunately, there’s zero possibility of an ectopic pregnancy becoming viable, no matter what marvels of modern medicine an OBGYN can perform. Usually, ectopic pregnancies are treated with injections that end the pregnancy or surgery to remove the fallopian tube. Either way, these life-saving medical procedures can be considered forms of abortion, and would now be punishable by law in some states. This means that people could face jail time for something completely out of their control just because they chose to save their own life. And without Roe v. Wade, there’s nothing a person can do about it if their state’s court system decides to rule against them. 5. Those Whose Cancer Treatment Would Affect the Fetus Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring type of cancer for women, and breast cancer rates are on the rise for women of childbearing age. Unfortunately, many of the recommended forms of cancer treatment can cause harm to a fetus and are not compatible with pregnancy. There are instances where a pregnant person with cancer can either wait until after their child is born to undergo treatment or select treatment methods that are least harmful to the fetus. However, there are also times when someone may need to decide whether it’s better to end a pregnancy during the early stages so they can undergo cancer treatment, or risk bringing a baby into the world while also dying. It’s not an easy decision to make either way, but the overruling of Roe v. Wade now makes it even more challenging. 6. The People Who Live With Mental Health Conditions That Require Daily Medications There are countless mental health conditions that require daily medications. Some of these conditions include depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. However, even with the wide variety of available medications out there for each and every single mental health condition, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists still says a majority of these medications are not safe during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester. Whether a pregnancy was planned or unexpected, a pregnant person who uses one or more psychiatric medications may be forced to decide whether or not they want to expose their fetus to the risks associated with the medication. In many cases, these medications can cause harmful birth defects or even harm the fetus in a way that makes life unsustainable. Therefore, these individuals need as many choices as possible available to them, including the right to terminate the pregnancy if that’s what they and their medical team feel is best. 7. Those Whose Epilepsy Puts Them At Risk for a Stillbirth Women with epilepsy are up to three times as likely to have a pregnancy that results in stillbirth than women who do not live with epilepsy. Sometimes, there’s no way of knowing whether they will experience a stillborn birth, whereas other times an OBGYN may no longer detect signs of life before the pregnant person even hits the third trimester. Without the option to abort, these individuals will be forced to carry a pregnancy to term even though the fetus will no longer grow and develop. 8. The People Who Almost Died With Their First Baby and Don’t Want to Go Through That Again There’s a lot that is still unknown about how pregnancy impacts the body. Conditions like pre-eclampsia are largely undetectable until it’s too late, as are other rare pregnancy complications. However, people who experience these issues during their first pregnancy are more likely to experience them again. This means a person may take active measures to avoid additional pregnancies. Unfortunately, no form of birth control is foolproof, and a person can still end up pregnant even when actively avoiding it. Should these individuals have to go through the same hell they endured during their first pregnancy if they don’t have to? And is that really someone else’s choice to make? 9. The Trans Man Who Would Struggle With the Dysphoria of a Pregnancy Thanks to the advances in modern medicine, trans men can do many things to counteract the gender dysphoria they experience. However, up to 30 percent of trans men still experience unplanned pregnancies. These pregnancies can lead to depression and other concerns due to the mixture of dysphoria and judgment from society. Before the overturning of Roe v. Wade, trans men could decide whether or not they wanted to go through with a pregnancy. Now that it is overturned, trans men in states with abortion laws in place may have no choice, and this combined with the stigma they likely already face due to society’s general view of the trans community in their geographic location, could cause depression and suicide rates to climb even more. This list isn’t exhaustive. However, it does provide a view into just how many people will be impacted due to the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In many cases, people who live with health conditions are already marginalized and mistreated by medical providers and society as a whole. Now they may face even more problems and harsh judgment just for making decisions that can help them continue to live. This isn’t the type of treatment anyone deserves, especially people who already have to fight for their right to live day in and day out.

Megan Glosson

What to Do When Someone Doesn't Believe Your BPD Is Real

Several years ago, I sat through one of the most difficult therapy sessions of my life. My then-husband and I were making one final attempt to “save” our marriage by attending counseling sessions together. At this point, I was still hopefully optimistic that we could find a way to work through the problems in our marriage. In fact, I felt confident that this would be the session something would click and the therapist would help us make a breakthrough. Yet, as soon as my then-husband mentioned the borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnosis I’d received a year prior to that, the therapist’s demeanor suddenly shifted. He focused on me completely and asked me questions about my diagnosis. As he did so, he got up and started digging around in a closet, hunting for his DSM-5 to “read the diagnosis” to me. In this situation, a mental health provider was questioning the validity of my meeting the criteria for BPD . However, many people who live with this condition experience pushback when they disclose their diagnosis. If this happens to you, here’s how you can navigate that conversation. When Talking to Loved Ones About Borderline Friends and family members often form perceptions about us that may or may not be the truth. They may take their limited knowledge of BPD from mainstream media and not understand how you fit into that picture. Or, they may discount your experiences entirely and place the blame elsewhere. They may tell you to “quit acting” or say you just need to “suck it up.” Regardless, here are some things you can do: 1. Validate their feelings, whatever they may be: Use language that shows you hear their position and realize how difficult this is. Say things like, “I understand why you feel that way,” or “I know I’ve done some hurtful things that can’t just be excused with a label.” Pause and listen before speaking so you get a full picture of their stance. 2. Provide resources about your diagnosis: Share links to organizations like the National Institute of Mental Health or the  National Alliance on Mental Illness , especially ones that provide guides for loved ones. Gift them books about borderline personality disorder written for family members, such as “Loving Someone With Borderline Personality Disorder ” by Shari Y. Manning and Marsha M. Linehan. 3. Explain your symptoms: Share a symptom you experience and give an example where your loved one was present. Share an everyday situation from your point of view and include details like emotions, thoughts, and bodily sensations that the situation brings up for you. 4. Set boundaries if necessary: Sometimes, loved ones aren’t ready or willing to accept what we have to say. If that’s the case, try setting boundaries that help you regulate your emotions and maintain the relationship with this loved one. When Interacting With Coworkers For better or worse, coworkers often get a very limited view into our lives. They rarely know about your past, and they probably don’t even know all the things you deal with outside of the workplace. Coworkers can also hold very different beliefs about mental health conditions in general and may not even see therapists or psychiatrists as “real” health care providers. Although coworkers can sometimes be difficult to deal with, you can try using the following suggestions during your conversation with them: 1. Remain calm: Coworkers can sometimes bring out the worst in us, whether they mean to or not. However, arguing with them or letting their comments dysregulate you won’t prove anything. So, use coping skills to remain calm and carry on a peaceful conversation. 2. Educate them with facts: Unless you work in clinical mental health , chances are your coworkers don’t really know much about BPD . If you listen to them while they share, you may be able to use your own knowledge of your diagnosis to help educate them and break apart some common myths about BPD . 3. Agree to disagree: Unfortunately, your coworker may just be stubborn and unwilling to listen to an opposing view. If that’s the case, simply “agree to disagree” and make the choice to not talk about this particular topic with them going forward. This is a form of boundary setting that can be effective with coworkers. When Dealing With Health Care Professionals Borderline personality disorder is still a very misunderstood, relatively under-researched mental health condition. Unfortunately, this means that even health care providers don’t always know the facts about this diagnosis. This misinformation can seriously impact your ability to connect with certain providers and receive the help you need. Obviously, you don’t want to come across as presumptuous to someone like a medical doctor or psychiatrist. However, you can try these suggestions if they try to dismiss your diagnosis: 1. Explain yourself: Share your symptoms with your provider. Be honest about how you feel and what you experience in a typical day. Sometimes, this insight can help your doctor better understand. 2. Ask for more information: Sometimes a doctor may be projecting confirmation bias onto you or dismissing your claim because they don’t feel like they’ve seen enough evidence of your diagnosis. If they argue that you don’t meet the criteria, you can ask questions and provide additional details to fill in the gaps for them. 3. Offer the diagnosing physician’s contact information: Although your provider should listen to you when you advocate for yourself, not every clinician will. So, if you’re having an especially hard time getting through to a particular provider, give them the contact information of the clinician who diagnosed you so your provider can vet them out. 4. Find a new provider (if necessary): Not every doctor is the best match for every client, and that’s OK. You have the right to advocate for your care, even if that means asking to see a different provider. Receiving a borderline personality disorder diagnosis can be a tough pill to swallow. However, it’s even harder to deal with when the people in your life are invalidating and unsupportive. Having these conversations can be hard, but hopefully, these tips give you the starting point you need to land the plane safely.