Megan Glosson

@megan-glosson | contributor
Mighty LeaderSuper Contributor
Hi, I'm Megan, a Community Leader here at The Mighty who also runs the "BPD Safe Zone" group. I'm very open about my struggles with Borderline Personality Disorder and other mental health conditions because I hope that by sharing my story, I can help erase the negative stigma surrounding mental illness. Besides writing, my daughters are my life. I love board games, traveling, and large quantities of ice cream. You can follow my personal journey at Living On The Borderline, or check out my writing on The Mighty, Thought Catalog, Unwritten, Thrive Global, Moms, and Project Wednesday.
Megan Glosson

5 Things to Do When Loneliness and Depression Attack

Last Saturday, I found myself in a rare situation: I was home alone (minus my cat). At first, I was excited to have some time to myself and planned to focus on some work I needed to do. However, as the hours ticked by, I started feeling more and more lonely. I missed my partner and my children, and the tasks I planned to accomplish started to feel like too much to handle. My thoughts began to spiral and I started settling into the all-too-familiar funk of loneliness. Thankfully, I have spent enough time on this very issue in therapy to not only recognize what was happening, but reach for my coping skills to pull myself out of the funk before I fell too far into it. However, I also realize that handling loneliness is a common issue for people who live with depression, myself included. So, here are some suggestions on how you can handle loneliness when you live with depression. 1. Reach out to close friends. When you live with depression, it’s easy to slip into a mindset that reaching out to friends makes you a burden. However, that’s rarely the case. If you feel lonely, sometimes the best thing you can do is reach out to a friend and see if they’re available to meet in person or virtually for a bit. Personally, I have a group of friends with an unofficial “loneliness agreement.” Essentially, if one of us is feeling lonely, we text the group. The other people respond so we can try to make plans to do something together. Sometimes we go out for dinner at one of our favorite local restaurants, and other times we meet at one person’s house and we each bring games and food. It’s pretty great. 2. Take advantage of interactive online communities. Although I firmly believe in-person contact is the best remedy for loneliness, we do live in a world where it’s very easy to connect with people who share similar interests or deal with similar health conditions online. In fact, there are dozens of forums and social platforms people can use to build strong connections with interactive online communities. The Mighty offers a lot of great groups, but you can just as easily post a thought or question to interact with others as well. There are also a fair amount of Subreddits specifically made for people who live with depression and other mental health conditions, or there are also support groups that meet online. If one of these types of virtual supports helps you combat loneliness, then it’s definitely worth it. 3. Focus on the present moment. Unfortunately, FOMO has become such a huge part of our lives since we’re constantly bombarded with pictures and check-ins on social media. Sometimes this can make you feel even more isolated and alone when you live with depression, and it’s easy to spiral deeper into a depressive episode the more you scroll through Instagram. If FOMO is contributing to your lonely feelings, I highly recommend trying some mindfulness exercises to refocus on the present moment. Meditation or paced breathing are ways to do this, but I personally love performing everyday tasks one-mindfully (focusing and being present to one thing with complete awareness) when I’m in a funk. I’ll ditch my phone on the couch, then walk to the kitchen and do the dishes or mop the floor. I also love eating ice cream one-mindfully because it combines my favorite food with my favorite dialectical behavior therapy skills for distress tolerance and mindfulness. 4. Find low-effort ways to connect. Sometimes going out with friends or washing the dishes requires too much energy, and I get that. However, there are still ways you can connect with the people you love and stay curled up in bed.If you’re craving connection but don’t want to leave your bedroom, you can: Use apps like Rave or Teleparty to watch television shows or movies with friends or family. Host a virtual happy hour or similar hangout through Zoom, Teams, FaceTime, or Facebook Messenger. Play multiplayer video games online. 5. Distract with activities you enjoy. I’m guilty of assuming the cure to loneliness is surrounding myself with other people. However, that’s really not always the case. In fact, there are lots ways you can combat loneliness by hanging out with yourself. Personally, I enjoy making or listening to music. Sometimes I even dance along. My oldest child enjoys drawing or reading books. I have friends who distract with puzzles, and others who paint. The activity itself isn’t important. What matters is that it’s something you genuinely enjoy doing. If it brings you joy, it will (hopefully) help those lonely feelings fade away. Living with depression is no walk in the park, especially when you feel lonely. Although it sometimes feels like you’re on an island by yourself, I hope you can find ways to connect with the people who love you. At the end of the day, the lies depression brain feeds us are usually utter crap, and talking to people who love us can help tear apart those lies.

Megan Glosson

I'm Scared About Borderline Personality Disorder Diagnosis

Maybe you’ve spent years trying to understand why you seemed different. Perhaps you’ve stumped countless professionals or been turned away when you weren’t “better” with a low dose of antidepressants and periodic therapy sessions. Maybe the world has always felt too intense, though you never understood why. But now, you’ve finally received the label to explain your feelings and your pain: borderline personality disorder (BPD). Receiving any medical news is difficult, especially when it’s related to mental health. These days, though, nobody bats an eye at the “run-of-the-mill” diagnoses like major depressive disorder (MDD) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Yet, somehow, when people hear the word “borderline,” they run for the hills. Carrying a BPD label comes with a heavy burden; there’s an attached stigma that is perpetuated by not only lay people across the internet, but countless mental health professionals as well. It’s understandable if you feel scared and overwhelmed right now; all BPD warriors have been in your exact shoes before. You’re wrestling with your own self-loathing, then adding on the fear of how your loved ones will react when you share the news (or if you even want to share your diagnosis at all). I need you to know this, though: your diagnosis does not define you. You fear abandonment and feel everything intensely, but that does not mean you are “overly dramatic” or “too much.” You may need constant reassurance and act impulsively to fill the emptiness you feel, but that does not mean you are “manipulative” or “sadistic.” You may outburst with intense anger or harm yourself to numb the pain, but that does not make you “abusive” or “dangerous.” The truth is, many of us who struggle with borderline personality disorder are simply unskilled children trapped inside adult-sized bodies, constantly searching for love and purpose. Now that you hold the golden ticket that explains everything you’ve experienced and all the burning bridges in your past, you can stop lurking in the shadows of the unknown and step into the light to start to understand yourself. All the rest of us are ready to receive you and walk with you hand-in-hand. You are no longer alone; you are part of a group that spans nearly 2 percent of the U.S. population… there are many of us out here. You may feel hopeless, but there is help. BPD is never a life sentence; we can learn skills and strategies that help put the world in perspective and allow us to better regulate ourselves. Through therapy and with the help of medications, most people may not even realize we are mentally ill at all. If nothing else, please know this: you are amazing, and the word “borderline” doesn’t change that. I love you just the way you are, and together we can stand on our own feet and walk the middle path through our lives even with a BPD diagnosis.

Megan Glosson

5 Things to Do When Loneliness and Depression Attack

Last Saturday, I found myself in a rare situation: I was home alone (minus my cat). At first, I was excited to have some time to myself and planned to focus on some work I needed to do. However, as the hours ticked by, I started feeling more and more lonely. I missed my partner and my children, and the tasks I planned to accomplish started to feel like too much to handle. My thoughts began to spiral and I started settling into the all-too-familiar funk of loneliness. Thankfully, I have spent enough time on this very issue in therapy to not only recognize what was happening, but reach for my coping skills to pull myself out of the funk before I fell too far into it. However, I also realize that handling loneliness is a common issue for people who live with depression, myself included. So, here are some suggestions on how you can handle loneliness when you live with depression. 1. Reach out to close friends. When you live with depression, it’s easy to slip into a mindset that reaching out to friends makes you a burden. However, that’s rarely the case. If you feel lonely, sometimes the best thing you can do is reach out to a friend and see if they’re available to meet in person or virtually for a bit. Personally, I have a group of friends with an unofficial “loneliness agreement.” Essentially, if one of us is feeling lonely, we text the group. The other people respond so we can try to make plans to do something together. Sometimes we go out for dinner at one of our favorite local restaurants, and other times we meet at one person’s house and we each bring games and food. It’s pretty great. 2. Take advantage of interactive online communities. Although I firmly believe in-person contact is the best remedy for loneliness, we do live in a world where it’s very easy to connect with people who share similar interests or deal with similar health conditions online. In fact, there are dozens of forums and social platforms people can use to build strong connections with interactive online communities. The Mighty offers a lot of great groups, but you can just as easily post a thought or question to interact with others as well. There are also a fair amount of Subreddits specifically made for people who live with depression and other mental health conditions, or there are also support groups that meet online. If one of these types of virtual supports helps you combat loneliness, then it’s definitely worth it. 3. Focus on the present moment. Unfortunately, FOMO has become such a huge part of our lives since we’re constantly bombarded with pictures and check-ins on social media. Sometimes this can make you feel even more isolated and alone when you live with depression, and it’s easy to spiral deeper into a depressive episode the more you scroll through Instagram. If FOMO is contributing to your lonely feelings, I highly recommend trying some mindfulness exercises to refocus on the present moment. Meditation or paced breathing are ways to do this, but I personally love performing everyday tasks one-mindfully (focusing and being present to one thing with complete awareness) when I’m in a funk. I’ll ditch my phone on the couch, then walk to the kitchen and do the dishes or mop the floor. I also love eating ice cream one-mindfully because it combines my favorite food with my favorite dialectical behavior therapy skills for distress tolerance and mindfulness. 4. Find low-effort ways to connect. Sometimes going out with friends or washing the dishes requires too much energy, and I get that. However, there are still ways you can connect with the people you love and stay curled up in bed.If you’re craving connection but don’t want to leave your bedroom, you can: Use apps like Rave or Teleparty to watch television shows or movies with friends or family. Host a virtual happy hour or similar hangout through Zoom, Teams, FaceTime, or Facebook Messenger. Play multiplayer video games online. 5. Distract with activities you enjoy. I’m guilty of assuming the cure to loneliness is surrounding myself with other people. However, that’s really not always the case. In fact, there are lots ways you can combat loneliness by hanging out with yourself. Personally, I enjoy making or listening to music. Sometimes I even dance along. My oldest child enjoys drawing or reading books. I have friends who distract with puzzles, and others who paint. The activity itself isn’t important. What matters is that it’s something you genuinely enjoy doing. If it brings you joy, it will (hopefully) help those lonely feelings fade away. Living with depression is no walk in the park, especially when you feel lonely. Although it sometimes feels like you’re on an island by yourself, I hope you can find ways to connect with the people who love you. At the end of the day, the lies depression brain feeds us are usually utter crap, and talking to people who love us can help tear apart those lies.

Megan Glosson

Mental Health Relapse Prevention Plan: What It Is and How to Make One

When I first started treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) in 2018, I thought I’d never be able to actually change. I worried that I’d continue using the self-destructive behaviors and unhealthy coping skills that had caused friends to walk away and even cost me my career in education. It seemed too difficult and unrealistic, and I felt overwhelmed by all of the skills and information I was learning through dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). About a year into my journey, I had already made tremendous progress though. In fact, I had managed to stay out of the hospital for over nine months and was stable enough to pick up a part-time job at a local drug and alcohol rehab facility. It was during my time there that I learned about relapse prevention plans and saw firsthand how effective they could be. In fact, I realized relapse prevention plans could help lots of people, not just those in addiction recovery. What Is a Relapse Prevention Plan, Anyway? A relapse prevention plan is like a toolkit to help you maintain the level of recovery you’ve already reached. It’s the, “oh shit!” list you can rely on to keep you on track when you feel like your life is going off the rails so you can avoid a “crash and burn” moment later. Relapse prevention plans often include a list of warning signs and triggers so you can intervene before you end up too far down the rabbit hole. They also usually include some coping strategies and recommendations for what to do if you notice the warning signs you mentioned or feel like you’re on your way toward a relapse. Sometimes, relapse prevention plans also include contact information for people you can reach out to for additional support on difficult days. Although many people associate relapse prevention plans with addiction recovery, you can make a relapse prevention plan for any condition that impacts your life negatively. In fact, you can even make relapse prevention plans for behaviors or unhealthy coping skills you’re actively trying to avoid. How to Make a Relapse Prevention Plan If you perform a quick internet search for a “relapse prevention plan,” you will find lots of free-to-download forms in various layouts. In my opinion, though, many of these forms aren’t thorough or include unnecessary information. So, here’s what I recommend you do to make your own relapse prevention plan. Identify goals you’re working towards. These may include things like improving your relationships , regulating your emotions, or reducing the use of unhealthy coping skills. Identify challenges you may face as you work towards your goals. These challenges could be triggers or roadblocks that have gotten in the way of your recovery in the past. Alternatively, you could write out warning signs that you aren’t doing well and may be on the verge of a relapse. List out several coping skills that work well for you. When selecting skills, try to write a variety of skills and include suggestions for distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and distracting yourself. Also, try to make sure there’s a coping skill listed that makes sense for each challenge or warning sign you identified. Write down contact information for your support system. These should be two or three people who are not part of your treatment team who can help you when you have a particularly tough day. In addition to these people, also make sure to list contact information for your treatment team (therapist, psychiatrist, etc.) so you have their information handy if needed. To give yourself a bit more motivation, write down at least three benefits of recovery and at least three consequences of relapsing. These benefits can be as simple or complex as you’d like, as can the consequences. Just make sure they’re significant enough to encourage you to follow your relapse prevention plan and continue your recovery work. Recovery from a disorder like BPD isn’t as impossible as people may make you believe. If you commit to doing the work and holding yourself accountable, you’ll be amazed at all you can achieve. A relapse prevention plan is just one tool you can use in your journey towards a life worth living, but I hope it’s one you’ll consider using.

Megan Glosson

How to Help When Someone You Love Has Borderline Personality Disorder

When someone you love lives with a mental illness like borderline personality disorder, it’s only natural that you’d want to help them and support them as best as you possibly can. Unless you also live with BPD, though, it’s hard to know how you can best support them without hurting their feelings or making the situation worse. So, here are some suggested dos and don’ts when someone you love lives with borderline personality disorder. Don’t: Make assumptions about their diagnosis. Between online forums and mainstream media, there are lots of false narratives about BPD that people can use to quickly make assumptions about their loved one’s diagnosis. However, a lot of these fallacies don’t have any factual basis, and more importantly, BPD can manifest in different ways for each person. Do: Make an effort to learn about their illness. Borderline personality disorder is a highly stigmatized, often misunderstood mental health condition. However, you can change the narrative around the disorder and connect with your loved one in a more meaningful way by learning about BPD. There are several great books about BPD written by people with lived experience and by experts, not to mention there are lots of great online resources (like The Mighty). Don’t: Call them “crazy.” When we don’t understand a person’s feelings or actions, it’s easy to place labels like “weird,” “crazy,” or “abnormal” on the person we don’t understand. However, calling someone you love crazy just because their perspective doesn’t align with yours isn’t supportive or helpful. This invalidation is hurtful, and it can ultimately make a person with BPD feel even worse about themselves and their diagnosis. Do: Validate their feelings. Psychologist Marsha Linehan once said, “People with BPD are like people with third degree burns over 90% of their bodies. Lacking emotional skin, they feel agony at the slightest touch or movement.” In other words, what may feel like a minor sting to you can feel extremely painful to your loved one with BPD. Although you may not always understand how they feel, you can listen to them explain their emotions to you and validate their feelings. Validation is a simple, yet powerful tool that helps people with BPD feel seen and heard. By simply showing someone you care, you may encourage them to open up more and continue working towards recovery. Don’t: Walk out on them if they’re genuinely trying their best. Fear of abandonment is a common symptom people with borderline personality disorder experience. Unfortunately, this fear of abandonment can drive a lot of other maladaptive behaviors and grows even more intense each time someone “walks out” when times get tough. In many cases, the person is simply trying their best and doesn’t always realize the full extent of their actions, especially if they’re still in denial about their diagnosis or in the early stages of recovery. Do: Set healthy boundaries if needed. As I mentioned, walking out on someone who is trying their best is incredibly defeating. However, your emotional health matters just as much as theirs. So, don’t be afraid to set healthy boundaries with your loved one as needed. Some examples of healthy boundaries include setting limits on phone conversations, making reasonable requests regarding behavior, and refusing to do something that goes against your morals. Sometimes, boundaries can be clearly communicated in a calm, matter-of-fact way, such as, “I will be silencing my phone at 10 pm every night. If you call after that, I will respond in the morning.” Other times, you may simply create boundaries for yourself like, “I will not get in the car and go to their house every time they seem upset. I will offer a list of suggested coping skills instead.” Boundaries can be tough at first, but they are also important for both you and your loved one. Just remember: boundaries aren’t a weapon or threat you can use against someone (i.e. “I’m setting a boundary until you get your feelings in check.”). They’re just a measure you can put in place and uphold to take care of your own needs. Don’t: Ignore mentions of suicide or self-harm. If you spend any time on the internet, you have probably seen all of the posts in online forums about how people with BPD are “attention-seeking” and “fake” their distress. However, that’s not really true at all. In fact, approximately 80 percent of people with BPD make at least one suicide attempt during their lifetime, and close to 10 percent die by suicide. For this reason, all mentions of suicide or self-harm should be taken seriously, even if that means you contact a hotline or your local crisis support center. Do: Encourage them to get help. Although you should always take mentions of self-harm seriously, you are probably not an expert trained in crisis stabilization — and that’s OK. The best thing you can do for your loved one when they are in crisis is offer support and help them contact the appropriate resources to get professional help. Many times, people who live with BPD have already created a crisis safety plan with their therapist, and you can reference that as needed. If they don’t have a safety plan already in place, encourage them to create one when they are no longer in crisis so it’s available for the future. Don’t: Blame everything on their diagnosis. Phrases like, “Quit being so borderline!” and “Your BPD is showing!” feel so common in modern society. However, these phrases can be quite damaging because they tie everything about a person back to their diagnosis. This can make people who live with BPD feel like they aren’t a person, but rather just a disorder. I have had several friends and loved ones connect my behaviors to my diagnosis over the years. While I sometimes understood their point, I don’t think they ever realized the way their words affected me and inhibited my progress. But once I recognized the connection between their words and my self-esteem, I was able to (with the help of my therapist) reframe these negative views and see the difference between my behaviors and my worth as a person. Do: Hold them accountable for their actions. As I mentioned, connecting a diagnosis to everything a person does can be damaging. However, accountability is an important part of the recovery process for BPD because it provides awareness. Oftentimes, a person’s maladaptive behaviors occur automatically, so pointing them out and holding someone accountable to the changes they’ve committed to can help them in early recovery. For example, splitting can be a maladaptive behavior that the brain jumps to automatically as a means of protection and a “fight or flight” response. It’s not a helpful way to cope, though, and should be replaced. If your loved one splits on you, you can point out the behavior, then encourage them to use skills they’ve learned in therapy to work through it. You can even say something like, “I’d love to talk to you about what you’re feeling right now, but I need you to remain calm while we talk. Is that something you can commit to?” Most of all, love them unconditionally. Most people with borderline personality disorder just want someone to care about them the same way they care about everyone they love. By following these suggested dos and don’ts and taking the time to learn more about ways you can make your loved one feel supported, you’ll go a long way towards helping them feel loved just the way they are.

Community Voices

What types of days do you have with BPD?

<p>What types of days do you have with BPD?</p>
11 people are talking about this
Community Voices

What types of days do you have with BPD?

<p>What types of days do you have with BPD?</p>
Community Voices

Failure

I've come to accept that the best part of my life was from about age 12-17. From then on its been nothing but #failure , #Anxiety , #Depression , #SuicidalThoughts , #Bipolar2Disorder and finally a #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder diagnosis. Somehow I found the perfect woman to love me unconditionally, but we had a son together and I've come to realize I never should have had a kid. I love him more than anything, but he's just like me and I have to watch him go through all of this, which is so much worse than going through it myself. I don't know what to do because he refuses any kind of help, just like I used to. I'm in a living hell...

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Megan Glosson

What Typical Days Look Like With Borderline Personality Disorder

Shortly after I first received my borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnosis, I described living with BPD as a storm inside of me . However, now that I’m several years into recovery, I’ve realized that not every day feels like a storm. In fact, I think that living with BPD is more like a weekly weather forecast filled with many different kinds of days. I Have Destructive Days Some days, I wake up seeing red. I punch the bathroom mirror because my reflection pisses me off. I blow up my friends’ phones. I break rules, I test limits, I drive my car too fast. I drink too much, avoid my work, and engage in self-harm. These days are the absolute worst. Sometimes I feel like I’m outside of myself, watching these events happen while I try to scream and force myself to stop. On these days, I watch the world burn and pretend not to care. I Have Empty Days Some days, I lie in bed for as long as I possibly can. I try to eat breakfast, but everything tastes bland. I work, but I feel like the work I do serves no purpose. I feel hollow, lifeless, and alone. Empty days are sometimes the hardest ones to weather because everything feels so pointless. These are typically the days when my suicidality reaches its peak, and I usually close myself off from my friends and family because I feel utterly unlovable. I feel lost, hopeless, and inadequate. I Have Happy Days Some days, the sunshine wakes me up. I put on a cute outfit, and I get right to work. I tackle everything on my to-do list. I laugh as I talk to my friends over dinner. I look in the mirror and don’t hate what I see. I feel genuinely satisfied with life. I think many people assume that people who live with a condition like borderline personality disorder only experience sad or angry days. However, that’s not the case at all. Happy days do occur, but sadly they aren’t always the norm. I Have Impulsive Days Some days, I forget what the words “patience” and “wise mind” mean. I book a trip I can’t afford and order take-out because it releases serotonin and dopamine. I overshare with a new coworker I barely know. I chop all my hair off and throw away half of the clothes in my closet because I want “a different vibe.” These impulsive days aren’t always obvious at the time. In fact, I sometimes mistake these days for happy ones. However, I often wake up the next day and see the aftermath of my impulsivity. Then, shame consumes me. I Have Recovery-Oriented Days Some days, I wake up motivated. I practice mindfulness. I label my emotions and communicate my needs in an assertive way. I use my skills and self-regulate. I set boundaries and step away when people push my buttons. Obviously, there are ebbs and flows with any health condition. However, I feel like I’ve reached a point where these recovery-oriented days are much more commonplace. My therapist says this is what “living well” looks like, and I love the way it feels. I think the biggest lesson I’ve learned about living with mental illness is that no emotion and no day lasts forever. Some days we just wake up on the wrong side of the bed, and we just have to do what it takes to make it through the day. Other days start out bleak but have the potential to improve if we’re willing to meet ourselves where we’re at and make the choice to turn it around.

Megan Glosson

Mental Health Relapse Prevention Plan: What It Is and How to Make One

When I first started treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) in 2018, I thought I’d never be able to actually change. I worried that I’d continue using the self-destructive behaviors and unhealthy coping skills that had caused friends to walk away and even cost me my career in education. It seemed too difficult and unrealistic, and I felt overwhelmed by all of the skills and information I was learning through dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). About a year into my journey, I had already made tremendous progress though. In fact, I had managed to stay out of the hospital for over nine months and was stable enough to pick up a part-time job at a local drug and alcohol rehab facility. It was during my time there that I learned about relapse prevention plans and saw firsthand how effective they could be. In fact, I realized relapse prevention plans could help lots of people, not just those in addiction recovery. What Is a Relapse Prevention Plan, Anyway? A relapse prevention plan is like a toolkit to help you maintain the level of recovery you’ve already reached. It’s the, “oh shit!” list you can rely on to keep you on track when you feel like your life is going off the rails so you can avoid a “crash and burn” moment later. Relapse prevention plans often include a list of warning signs and triggers so you can intervene before you end up too far down the rabbit hole. They also usually include some coping strategies and recommendations for what to do if you notice the warning signs you mentioned or feel like you’re on your way toward a relapse. Sometimes, relapse prevention plans also include contact information for people you can reach out to for additional support on difficult days. Although many people associate relapse prevention plans with addiction recovery, you can make a relapse prevention plan for any condition that impacts your life negatively. In fact, you can even make relapse prevention plans for behaviors or unhealthy coping skills you’re actively trying to avoid. How to Make a Relapse Prevention Plan If you perform a quick internet search for a “relapse prevention plan,” you will find lots of free-to-download forms in various layouts. In my opinion, though, many of these forms aren’t thorough or include unnecessary information. So, here’s what I recommend you do to make your own relapse prevention plan. Identify goals you’re working towards. These may include things like improving your relationships , regulating your emotions, or reducing the use of unhealthy coping skills. Identify challenges you may face as you work towards your goals. These challenges could be triggers or roadblocks that have gotten in the way of your recovery in the past. Alternatively, you could write out warning signs that you aren’t doing well and may be on the verge of a relapse. List out several coping skills that work well for you. When selecting skills, try to write a variety of skills and include suggestions for distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and distracting yourself. Also, try to make sure there’s a coping skill listed that makes sense for each challenge or warning sign you identified. Write down contact information for your support system. These should be two or three people who are not part of your treatment team who can help you when you have a particularly tough day. In addition to these people, also make sure to list contact information for your treatment team (therapist, psychiatrist, etc.) so you have their information handy if needed. To give yourself a bit more motivation, write down at least three benefits of recovery and at least three consequences of relapsing. These benefits can be as simple or complex as you’d like, as can the consequences. Just make sure they’re significant enough to encourage you to follow your relapse prevention plan and continue your recovery work. Recovery from a disorder like BPD isn’t as impossible as people may make you believe. If you commit to doing the work and holding yourself accountable, you’ll be amazed at all you can achieve. A relapse prevention plan is just one tool you can use in your journey towards a life worth living, but I hope it’s one you’ll consider using.