Renee Collett

@reneecollett | contributor
I'm an optimistic Sagittarius inspired by life's little nuances. My purpose in this world is to make those around me smile, laugh, think and feel worthy of living.
Community Voices

Can social media make you even more sad and feel more lonely? #Depression #alone

I am not sure if having instagram and facebook makes feel more lonely, I have hope to meet some new people with that yet I see no one that I can relate with. I feel way to bad in this world

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Renee Collett

20 Photos of People Who Are Anxious at Night

When nighttime falls, it seems like the entire world is asleep. But when you live with anxiety and nighttime falls, it can seen like the entire world is asleep — except for you. Why? Because for many, nighttime offers no break from anxiety. To help others understand the truth about nighttime anxiety, we asked members of our community to share photos and some words that describe this reality. Nighttime anxiety can look different to everyone, but if you can relate, use these photos as a reminder that you’re not alone. Here’s what our community shared: 1. “This is what my anxiety looks like after another failed job interview. I start feeling like I’m not good enough for any job I apply to. This is also in the middle of my  non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) acting up due to anxiety and I’m trying to not have to go to the emergency room.” — Kimy B. 2. “I hide my anxiety so well. I have to. That smile is just a way to tell everybody I’m OK. This particular picture, I was just fine, until a few minutes later. Trying to make supper for the kids, do laundry, sweep the floor, break up arguments and I just broke. I couldn’t breathe. My heart raced so fast I thought I was going to pass out. I just bawled. I couldn’t help but to fall to the floor. It took a while to come back. The attacks are was worse than they have ever been. I black out and can’t see straight. I lose all focus on everything.” — Chrystal S. 3. “I stay in bed at all times when I’m really anxious. I usually push my pillow under my arms, and use it as a support.” — Joanna L. 4. “Hiding my pain/distress. I only cry when alone and can give in. Wishing the ground would just swallow me up and do everyone a favor.” — Catherine W. 5. “My wife works second shift and sends me pictures of her being cute and goofy. After a panic attack tonight, this is all I could muster to send back.” — Chisa P. Having trouble falling asleep? Download our app to connect with others who may be struggling. 6. “Doesn’t show much, but I’ve been battling my anxiety. It’s so bad that I’m obsessing over a word I couldn’t find. I’ve been attacking my family. I don’t know why I’m so broken. Keeping it inside. Getting ready to take my nighttime pills.”–Cheyenne B. 7. “This is what anxiety at night looks like. I feared socializing. I feared myself.” — Tia S. 8. “ One of my many sleepless nights. She calms me down.” — Dustin S. 9. “ My anxiety means me taking a shower at 2 a.m. because I am unable or unwilling to try to sleep, knowing that my brain won’t stay quiet anyway. It also means trying to get work done and being unable to because I’m so tired.” — Erika K. 10. “Anxiety has always been a part of my life. Anxiety doesn’t have a look; anxiety is simply a face of a person because anyone and everyone experiences it. This photo was taken after having a panic attack in the middle of the night that woke me up. Anxiety is so controlling.” — Emma-Louise J. 11. “ I actually keep an album of pictures of me throughout panic attacks, bipolar mania and depression so I can see how far I’ve come when I look bright in the mirror. It’s an album only for me.” — Summer P. 12. “In this specific photo I wasn’t tired, but my husband was already in bed and I was struggling. I laid next to him and he did this in his sleep. It made me feel loads better and I fell asleep not long after.” — Katt C. 13. “Saw a spider, set off my anxiety. Too alert to calm down and go to sleep. Everything out of place looked like spiders crawling. Too alert and shaky. So, I shuffled through my new oracle deck and gave my friend an oracle reading, hoping we could just chat and I would calm down enough to sleep. I felt guilty for keeping her up, though. But the cards helped me slow down, connect and slowly forget the spiders that I had been scanning the walls and floors for.” — Alysia M. 14. “A selfie that was taken after I got thrown out of a nightclub because I was having a panic attack on the dance floor. All my friends were inside and I was scared out of my mind.” — Jenn H. 15. “ Can’t sleep. I just hide from the world. It’s like a cloud of fog. I ignore the phone and tell my friends I’m busy. I just want to shut the world outside. I want to just curl up in a corner.” — Mish R. 16. “This was me trying to sleep at a program last year where I was living away from my husband. Terrible separation anxiety/co-dependency.” — Kayla T. 17. “ It’s invisible but definitely real, racing thoughts like a hamster on a wheel. That voice that tells you what’s real isn’t real and what you feel isn’t what you feel. That doubt you don’t go a day without. All the words you’ve said that got taken the wrong ways, the words left unsaid that are now stuck on replay. Tears fill the room as you’re gasping for air. You know you can swim but your drowning instead. Nothing can take back the harsh words in your head, so you cry and you cry as you beg for your strength. Keep taking deep breaths hoping the pain blows away.” — Tonia O. 18. “Some people survive and talk about it, some people survive and go silent. Everyone deals with unimaginable pain in their own way, and everyone is entitled to that without judgment.” — Heidi M. 19. “I make Tik Tok videos when I can’t sleep due to anxiety. It gets me out of the anxious head space by focusing on something positive and forcing my brain to be creative. The goal is to make someone else smile and help them cope with their illnesses or whatever issues they may have that day.” — Ashé V. 20. “Silent cries, every night.” — MaKenzie W. Whatever anxiety at night looks like for you, just know that we see you and that you’re not alone. In you’re struggling to sleep tonight, check out the stories below: 16 Products to Try If You’re Feeling Anxious Tonight 20 Songs People Listen to When Anxiety Keeps Them Up at Night 

Renee Collett

9 'White Lies' People With Anxiety Tell

Let’s face it: we’re all guilty of telling a little white lie every now and then. This is especially true for those us with anxiety. When your mind is riddled by anxiety, telling tiny fibs to get out of a triggering situation seems like the best and only option. Anxiety can be hard to explain, especially for someone who doesn’t know what it’s like. I’ll admit that I’ve lied about being sick just to get out of going to a dinner party. When it comes to protecting myself around my anxiety triggers, I try my hardest. And sometimes, that means telling a white lie. We wanted to know what “white lies” people tell because of their anxiety, so we asked our mental health community to share one lie they tell and why they tell it. If you are living with anxiety and find yourself telling white lies, just know you’re not alone. Your feelings are valid — and hopefully you’re surrounding by people you can be a little more honest with. Here’s what our community shared: 1. “I’m sick.” “I use this one a lot when I just can’t function because of my anxiety and need to take off of work or whatever else.” — Natalie. “‘I just don’t feel that great today, something with my stomach.’ In all reality, my anxiety just overcomes me and makes me think I don’t want to go out and enjoy something.” — Maggie S. 2. “I’m fine.” “I will often say, ‘I’m fine.’ I’m rarely fine when I say it. I hate making other people worry or get upset, so I do it to spare them from feeling bad.” — Jennifer T. “I always say, ‘I’m OK,  I’m fine, nothing’s wrong.’ I also try to change the conversation back to the other person and talk about something other than myself.” — Ashley L. “‘I’m fine.’ — it’s a lot easier to say rather than trying to explain my feelings and potentially being judged.” — Sarah S. 3. “I drank too much coffee.” “This is going to sound weird, but I say that I drank a lot of caffeine. It’s easier to explain my fast talking, anxious movements, panicked look, shaky hands and fast heart rate if it’s caused by some understandable substance versus something you can’t see.” — Christina S. “‘I drank too much coffee.’ In reality, I’m just anxious and don’t want to be out in public.” — Kali D. 4. “I’m just tired.” “‘I’m just tired.’ It explains being quiet and gives me a good reason to leave without explaining myself.” — Tia J. “I say this because most of the time, I don’t have the energy to explain how I feel. Most of the time, they don’t get it/understand it. I feel like nothing is going to change or be done if I say what’s really wrong, anyway.” — Maddie D. “I say this because a lot of times when I was feeling anxious when I was younger, my mother would just tell me that I was tired whenever I would start to cry and feel overwhelmed. She would tell me to just go to sleep and I would cry myself to sleep. I have a tendency to do that now, even as a 30-year-old. It’s hard to do that when it’s 10 in the morning or you’re in the middle of work.” — Gregoria R. Need a non-judgmental place to talk about anxiety? Download our app and connect with others using the hashtag #Anxiety. 5. “I’m busy.” “That ‘I’m busy.’ Typically, that’s code for I’m struggling and I’m busy trying to keep any amount of sanity I have left in me. It sucks when it completely controls me. So sick of it all.” — Kaylyn W. “‘Sorry I can’t make it, something has come up.’ Nothing’s come up except my social anxiety.” — Adele H. “‘Sorry I can’t come tonight, I have to work early tomorrow.’” — Alex M. 6. “I’m feeling better.” “That I ‘am feeling better.’ I never feel better. I always feel bad. When people tell me to feel better, I just say thanks because they just don’t get it.” — Chanelle C. “This often translates to ‘I’m barely hanging on.’ My closest friends and family can usually tell the white lie for what it is, but as a teacher I can’t always let that side of me show. I need to be the strong one in the room, which is an exhausting task when the anxiety is high.” — Kara D. 7. “I just have a headache.” “I get a lot of migraines. However, if anxiety is taking over, I will cancel plans and crawl into bed and use the excuse of a migraine to avoid explaining what is really happening. The migraine is more believable to be people who don’t know or who don’t want to know about my mental issues. I don’t like to lie, but it’s just easier.” — Sara G. “I usually just say I have a migraine because although it isn’t a lie, it’s easier than explaining that I have tons of things running through my mind and I can’t pinpoint exactly what’s wrong with me.” — Ashley R. 8. “I overslept.” “I was only late to work because I overslept, even though I woke up an hour early just to be on time, and then sat on the edge of the bed for half an hour trying to prepare myself for human contact, only to be late to work yet again. Honestly, I’ve ran out of excuses for being late.” — Toriva B. 9. “Never mind, it’s not important.” “If I speak up, I often back out of the conversation by saying it didn’t matter. Because of the anxiety, I don’t usually speak up unless it is important. I’m so afraid of confrontation that I’ll instantly regret saying anything and pretend it doesn’t matter.” — Phaedra M. “I say it to everything until I boil over and can’t handle it anymore. I know it’s not healthy, but a lot of people depend on me to be strong and I can’t let them down. But no one ever asks if the person making sure everyone else is OK is all right themselves.” — Autumn C. What “white lie” do you tell because of your anxiety? Tell us in the comments below.

Renee Collett

The Mighty's Spotify Playlists

Although music can’t take away mental or physical pain, it does have a miraculous way of making us feel better — if only for a moment. Studies have shown music increases blood flow, eases pain and lowers stress-related hormones.  Relatable songs can help us feel supported on our loneliest days, and the right playlist can carry us through life’s daily challenges. While our mental and physical conditions, as well as our tastes in music, may differ, we can be united by the way music makes us feel. That’s why we wanted to share The Mighty’s very own curated playlists, which are all featured on our Spotify. We hope you find one that resonates with you: 1. For when you want to know what your favorite Instagram influencers are listening to: Media influencers who are advocates for mental and chronic illnesses act as role models for many, sharing their own experiences to make us feel less alone. Listen to custom-made playlists from inspirational people who’ve been there. 2. For when you could use a bit of cheering up: Blue? Stressed? These recommendations for our community might help boost your mood… if only for a little bit. 3. For when anxiety is keeping you up at night: These songs might be able to drown out those nighttime anxious thoughts. 4. For those going through a rough day with their chronic illness: A playlist full of powerful reminders that might help you get through a rough day. 5. For when you’re feeling alone: Even in a crowded room full of people, you can still feel lonely. Listen to this playlist for some reassurance and comfort. Want to see what other Mighty members are listening to? Download our app and explore the hashtag #MightyMusicCorner. 6. For when you’re experiencing the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder: Here are some songs that have helped people cope with their PTSD symptoms. 7. For show tune lovers facing anxiety: Entertaining and uplifting songs from Broadway shows that can help you get through difficult times. 8. For when you need some morning motivation: Let’s face it — mornings can be tough. But these things songs have motivated people to get out the door and start their day. 9. For rock ‘n’ rollers (who rock with anxiety): Whether you’re a classic rock fan or not, these songs have a way of relieving some anxiety. 10. For those coping with sensory overload: When the world around gets to be too much, here are some songs that helped autistic people in our community. 11. For those dealing with depression in the morning: If you’re dealing with depression, we know how difficult it can be to wake up in the morning. These songs might be what you need. 12. For those coping with suicidal thoughts: Our community shared what songs help them when they’re suicidal. Here’s a playlist to remind you that you’re not alone. Music can have the power of healing, and you deserve to heal. Go to our Spotify page, where you can find more playlists made just for you.

Community Voices

#DailyReminder never forget how far you've come

Two years ago--around this very time of year-- I transferred universities after beginning my mental health recovery journey. This weekend, I returned to my old school for a visit and was flooded with so many emotions.
Returning to an environment that carries such trauma and negative experiences is quite difficult; I underestimated how hard this trip would be. As I wait to board my flight back home, I'm excited to leave, and I'm exhausted. Maybe having my two year anniversary of hitting rock bottom in the very place that I fell so low wasn't the best idea, but it made me realize how far I've come. Today, I will treat myself with a little extra love. I'm keeping my chin up and reminding myself how much stronger and happier I am now! I wanted to share this with you as a reminder to dwell less on the past and instead, celebrate the here & now. You've come so far and you're alive today; that is something that you should be endlessly proud of :) #MentalHealth #Recovery #EatingDisorders #Anxiety #DailyReminder

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Community Voices

#DailyReminder never forget how far you've come

Two years ago--around this very time of year-- I transferred universities after beginning my mental health recovery journey. This weekend, I returned to my old school for a visit and was flooded with so many emotions.
Returning to an environment that carries such trauma and negative experiences is quite difficult; I underestimated how hard this trip would be. As I wait to board my flight back home, I'm excited to leave, and I'm exhausted. Maybe having my two year anniversary of hitting rock bottom in the very place that I fell so low wasn't the best idea, but it made me realize how far I've come. Today, I will treat myself with a little extra love. I'm keeping my chin up and reminding myself how much stronger and happier I am now! I wanted to share this with you as a reminder to dwell less on the past and instead, celebrate the here & now. You've come so far and you're alive today; that is something that you should be endlessly proud of :) #MentalHealth #Recovery #EatingDisorders #Anxiety #DailyReminder

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Community Voices

I’ve a run of good days but today I feel a bit blue.

I’m contemplating my future and how it’s going to be if certain people aren’t in it. Not sure if it’s negative thinking down to my depression or coming out of it slightly and realising I feel used.

My relationship has become so that I’m ‘motherly’ and although affection and declarations of love are there on his part, the intimacy has gone and that’s not down to me. I’m wondering if it will ever come back, and if not - can I live like that forever? How long do I wait?

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Community Voices

Vomited my #Anxiety all over zen friend

I had lunch with a friend yesterday and she’s so zen and I’m so...me. She’s so thoughtful about what she says and I just blurted out all this stuff I wanted to tell her. Basically, I feel like I just vomited my anxiety and problems all over her. I left with physical anxiety - why would she want to be friends with me, why aren’t I zen like her, and on and on and on.

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Renee Collett

10 Products People With Anxiety Should Have on Their Nightstand

Nighttime can be hard, especially for those with nighttime anxiety. While the rest of the world sleeps, anxious thoughts continue to stir in your mind, keeping you up throughout the night. At a time when your body craves a good night’s sleep, your mind seems to advocate for the opposite. Having anxiety at night is tough, but there may be something out there to help ease your mind. Whether it’s a favorite book, a go-to music playlist or a cozy stuffed animal, having certain items nearby can help quiet anxious thoughts at night and give you a moment of relaxation — and maybe even some shuteye. We wanted to know what items help people with anxiety at night, so we asked our mental health community to share an item that fits right on their nightstand, easily accessible for some much needed peace of mind. Here are some recommendations from our community: 1. An Essential Oil Diffuser “My essential oils diffuser with relaxing oils like lavender and wild orange.” –Megan R. “I use essential oils a lot for my anxiety. I keep them all on my nightstand and if I’m ever struggling particularly more one night, I’m able to grab one quick and apply it or just breathe it in to help calm me down.” — Brianna H. Our pick: InnoGear 2nd Version Aromatherapy Essential Oil Diffuser ($15.99) 2. Silly Putty “I keep a small tin of silly putty on my nightstand so that I can channel my anxious energy into something.” — Kaitlin L. Our pick: 3-Pack of  Floam Slime Mud ($9.99) 3. Candles   “A candle. I can sit and stare at the fire all night. Calms me right down.” — Manda J. Our pick: Lavender and Cedarwood Aromatherapy Candle from from Bath & Body Works ($14.50) 4. Salt Lamp “The lamp is just bright enough that I can still see if I need to check on something and not wake anyone else up.” — Phaedra M. “My anxiety is higher at night because of my fear of the dark. Having a lamp helps me to calm down as it brightens every corner of my room. Gives me an inner peace.” — Raechael A. Our pick: Himalayan Glow 1002 Pink Crystal Salt Lamp ($16.99) 5. Stuffed Animals “I have a stuffed animal elephant that my son won for me from a claw machine. I sleep with him every night. I instantly feel calmer when I hold him.” — Stephanie R. “I have a stuffed teddy bear that my husband gave me when we first got together. He’s been through numerous, months at a time, hospital stays. He helps me through my anxiety and PTSD.” — Liz Ann T. Our pick: Lavender Aromatherapy Bear ( $15.95) 6. A Water Bottle “It’s actually just a simple water bottle. I wake up confused and sweaty. So I grab my bottle and it makes my brain stop a second to do a simple task. Not only do I get rid of my choking feeling, I have to perform an easy task which slows down my brain’s thoughts.” — Cassandra M. “A camelback water bottle. Something about sipping the water and not chugging it is soothing.” — Jennifer M. Our pick: CamelBak Eddy Water Bottle ($13.13) 7. A Journal “My notebook. It’s mostly just full of scribbles or random words and drawings, but it helps to keep my hands and mind busy.” — Phoenix G. “My journal. Sometimes just being able to get my thoughts out of my head and onto paper can help my racing mind calm down. It helps me organize my thoughts and feel like I can breathe again.” — Laura C. Our pick: Leather Journal ( $14.95) 8. A Sleep Mask “Sleep mask. Makes you close your eyes.” — Jables B. “I bought a great eye mask on Amazon and it has been super helpful. It allows me to blink normally as I would if I were falling asleep without it. I need total darkness and meds to be able to sleep, and that mask is the best thing I’ve found to help me fall asleep.” — Mandie L. Our picks: Cotton Sleep Eye Mask ( $13.99) 9. Aromatherapy Lotions “Aromatherapy lotion helps me. I personally like lavender and find it to be the most calming. But you can use any scent that calms you.” — Sarah C. “Bath & Body Works travel aromatherapy lotion and oil! A little bit goes a long way, so it’s what anybody can do on a budget! Sometimes anxiety can make it hard for me to fall asleep, so any of these give me that little extra help to take deep breaths and relax.” — Janelle G. Our pick: Lavender and Vanilla Aromatherapy Lotion from Bath & Body Works ($15.50) 10. Your Favorite Book “I love to read ‘cozy mysteries.’ A little love, a little humor, a little mystery and, often times, a little magic too.” — Chelsea S. “Comics of one of my favorite superheroes.” — Jacinta M. “A book. Reading helps me focus all that anxious energy into something a little more positive and helps me relax so I can sleep.” — Kalli R. Some of our community’s favorite books can be found here. For more ways to help ease your nighttime anxiety, check out these articles: 19 Tips for When Anxiety Keeps You Up at Night 16 Products to Try If You’re Feeling Anxious Tonight What item do you keep on your nightstand? Let us know in the comments below!

Renee Collett

What Not to Say to Someone With a Mental Illness Around the Holidays

Oh, the holidays. It’s the season of giving, holiday parties, celebrations for the New Year, spending time with family and friends — and the seemingly inevitable and unwelcome comments from people that feel like a punch in the gut. The holiday season can be just as stressful as it is merry, especially for those who live with a mental illness. Gathering together with people who don’t understand mental health can be incredibly frustrating. Although harm may not be intentional, the conversations you have during this time can be filled with triggering comments, making the holidays even more difficult to get through. While we cannot control the hurtful comments made by others, we can support each other by acknowledging and validating just how painful their words can be. Though the holidays often mean parties, celebrations and vacations, mental illnesses don’t always take a break. We wanted to know what sometimes innocent, but potentially harmful comments people say to those living with a mental illness around the holidays, so we asked our mental health community to share their experiences. Yes — the holidays can be a joyful time of year, but it’s completely OK to not be OK. Your mental health still matters and you’re not alone. Here’s what our community had to say: “‘ Everybody gets depressed. ‘ It negates the depth of the struggle and fails to recognize the difference between depression and situational sadness.” –Shannon R. “ ‘Let it go and just enjoy the season. Practice gratitude and mindfulness. ‘ If it were that easy, wouldn’t depression and suicide be a non-issue?” — Denise N. “‘ It doesn’t matter that you don’t really have a family. You’ve married into one and made your own.’ Holidays are a time of family and togetherness. While I’m grateful for what I have, I mourn not having grandparents, parents, aunts and uncles, etc. I feel immense guilt for feeling sorrowful when people say this to me because I do have in-laws and my own children, but that hole will unfortunately remain.” — Heather M. “‘ Can’t you just stop thinking so negative and be happy. It’s Christmas. ‘ No, I can’t just magically shut off my brain.” — Janey C. “‘ You’re looking so healthy! ‘ This is translated by my eating disorder as, ‘You’ve gained weight.’” — Mira K. “ ‘Be happy with what you have.’ I’m not happy on a daily basis. I’m not going to be happy during the holidays when it’s the worst time of the year.” — Alicia E. “‘ Why don’t you smile and be happy? ‘ It hurts because I can’t just turn on a switch and be happy. I mean, I struggle a lot and especially during the holidays and end of year time.” — Hollie M. “‘ It’s the happiest time of the year! ‘ I love Christmas, but it doesn’t change everything that I go through. My chronic pain, anxiety and PTSD doesn’t go away because it’s the holidays.” — Liz Ann T. “‘ Oh, you’ll have a great time at home!’ I dread going home for the holidays. That’s why I live abroad and rarely contact my family, because I love them, but spending too much time with them is bad for my mental health.” — Sabine R. “‘ You have power to control your mind; you can stop it without any medication or therapy.’ This hurts the most because I actually listen to them, I don’t take any medicine and I’ve never stepped a foot in the therapist’s office. Still waiting for that day where, ‘I can control this.’” –Tabetha R. “‘Look at all the lights. Listen to all the music. How can you be sad with all this joy around?’” — Elizabeth C. “’ Did you take your meds? You don’t seem joyful.’ Just because I take meds for my anxiety doesn’t mean they automatically make happy and cheerful.” — Katie G. “‘ Winter/Christmas is your favorite time of the year, you shouldn’t be sad!’ Oh, OK, got it!” — Heather M. “‘ We’re going back home to visit family for the holidays. ‘ It’s a completely harmless comment and they have no idea, but it cuts deep when you know you’ll never be doing that same thing due to mental illness with you and your family back home.” — Vanessa M. “‘You have so much to be happy about, everyone gets depressed and there are people who have it worse, you’re being dramatic.’” — Danielle W. “‘ Don’t let it get to you,’ or, “ Don’t let it ruin your day.’ Cheers, so it’s my fault you can’t stop yourself from saying insensitive things about me and it’s my fault that it gets to me. All I needed right there to enjoy Christmas is pure unfiltered blame. It really destroys me when that happens, so it’s my fault if I get upset and something you said even though you know it would upset me or worse trigger me.” — Callum C. “‘ I’m going to have to go for a run to burn that off. ‘ When dealing with an eating disorder, hearing comments about calories or exercise is extremely triggering.” — Beth S. ‘” It’s just in your head, so it’s easy to get rid of.’ This is all year, though, but this hurts because I thought people were smarter than this. Why would it be easier to get rid of when it’s ‘just in my head?’” — Cornelia H. “‘ Are you coming? ‘ This hurts because I know in my depressed mind, I can’t and the feelings of loneliness and emptiness prevail making me feel worse.” — Bell R. “ ‘Calm down.’ Just because I’m with my family and the people I love the most doesn’t mean I’m not anxious.” — Morgan C. “‘ You’re so quiet.’ Maybe that’s because I really don’t want to be here and you’re just making it that much more awkward and worse.” — Alyssa B. “‘ Just try to be happy. Be in a good mood. Don’t complain today.’ People think you can just turn your illness on/off for holidays or special occasions like it’s no big deal.” — Allison M. “‘ I’m sure it’s not easy, but is it really debilitating? ‘” — Dee F. This comment comes from my own parents. I say I’m tired around this time of year and they usually respond with, ‘ You’re always tired, ‘ like all I need is a nap. We’ve had the depression talk before, but I just pretty much lie to them and say, ‘ I’m fine,’ because I can’t explain myself anymore.” — Rian T. “‘ Take your meds and smile like the rest of us. Did you take your meds? You need to eat more. You’d look nicer if you smiled.’ ” — Raven M. The holidays are hard, but you don’t have to neglect your mental health just because someone tells you to, “ Cheer up.” Don’t be afraid to reach out for extra help this holiday season. You’re deserving of continuous support, regardless of the time of year. What’s something you’d like to hear around the holidays? Let us know in the comments below.