Sarah Hollis

@sarah-hollis | contributor
I have struggled with Anxiety and Depression for the last 6 years. I wanted to find a place where I can read/write articles for a community of people that can truly understand what I am going through.
Sarah Hollis

When Your Depression and Anxiety Makes You Feel Like a Burden

Mental illness is extremely tough — both struggling through it yourself, to having a loved one who is struggling with it. I have been on both sides of the coin. Currently, I am dealing with anxiety and depression. I have dealt with it for the past six years, and every single day is a blessing and a curse at the same time. It’s a blessing because I get to live my life with all the amazing people I know and love; a curse because my mental illness creeps in on me in every aspect of my life. With my anxiety and depression, there is one lingering, evil thought I have every single day: I am a burden to others. One of my greatest strengths, as well as my greatest weakness, is that I live to please other people — so much in fact that I forget to take care of myself. Because of that, my anxiety and consequently depression are at all new highs. Something I have learned through all of this is that I need to talk about what I am going through. I believe keeping things inside is the worst possible thing anyone struggling with mental illness can do. You begin to isolate yourself from the world because you feel like nobody can possibly understand what you are going through. You stop reaching out to people because you believe you are going to bring them down with you. Well, guess what? You’re not going to. Let me make something very clear: you are not a burden . I know that is easier to read than to believe; trust me, I do. I am struggling with this very concept right now. It is so hard for me to reach out to my loved ones because I don’t want to interfere with their happiness and well-being. If the people you decide to reach out to really care about you, they will stick with you. If they turn away, then that is their problem. You need to surround yourself with people who are going to bring you up and listen to you in your most desperate times of need. Something my loved ones have reiterated to me repeatedly is that I am not doing any of these things, and hopefully, your trusted people will tell you the same exact thing. If you are experiencing any kind of mental illness, I want to encourage you to keep going and keep talking through it. That is so much easier said than done, I know, but you must take care of yourself. You are the most important person in your life. If you’re not good for yourself, how can you be good for anyone else? If you keep everything in and are afraid you’re going to be a burden to everyone else, you’re not going to get any better. So, go out and don’t be afraid to share your feelings. They are important, and you are so worth listening to. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via pecaphoto77

Sarah Hollis

When Your Depression and Anxiety Makes You Feel Like a Burden

Mental illness is extremely tough — both struggling through it yourself, to having a loved one who is struggling with it. I have been on both sides of the coin. Currently, I am dealing with anxiety and depression. I have dealt with it for the past six years, and every single day is a blessing and a curse at the same time. It’s a blessing because I get to live my life with all the amazing people I know and love; a curse because my mental illness creeps in on me in every aspect of my life. With my anxiety and depression, there is one lingering, evil thought I have every single day: I am a burden to others. One of my greatest strengths, as well as my greatest weakness, is that I live to please other people — so much in fact that I forget to take care of myself. Because of that, my anxiety and consequently depression are at all new highs. Something I have learned through all of this is that I need to talk about what I am going through. I believe keeping things inside is the worst possible thing anyone struggling with mental illness can do. You begin to isolate yourself from the world because you feel like nobody can possibly understand what you are going through. You stop reaching out to people because you believe you are going to bring them down with you. Well, guess what? You’re not going to. Let me make something very clear: you are not a burden . I know that is easier to read than to believe; trust me, I do. I am struggling with this very concept right now. It is so hard for me to reach out to my loved ones because I don’t want to interfere with their happiness and well-being. If the people you decide to reach out to really care about you, they will stick with you. If they turn away, then that is their problem. You need to surround yourself with people who are going to bring you up and listen to you in your most desperate times of need. Something my loved ones have reiterated to me repeatedly is that I am not doing any of these things, and hopefully, your trusted people will tell you the same exact thing. If you are experiencing any kind of mental illness, I want to encourage you to keep going and keep talking through it. That is so much easier said than done, I know, but you must take care of yourself. You are the most important person in your life. If you’re not good for yourself, how can you be good for anyone else? If you keep everything in and are afraid you’re going to be a burden to everyone else, you’re not going to get any better. So, go out and don’t be afraid to share your feelings. They are important, and you are so worth listening to. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via pecaphoto77

Community Voices

Self Care: Easy to Say, Hard to Do

Lately, one of the things I have struggled with the most is self-care. I have seen so many articles and heard so many different things from people on self-care. You have probably have heard this, but SELF CARE IS SO IMPORTANT! You’re probably thinking, “of course Sarah, our world is all about ‘me me me'”. However, in my humble opinion, there is a difference between taking care of yourself and self care.

Taking care of yourself could mean a whole myriad of things. Making sure the bills are paid, nursing yourself back to health when you’re sick, cleaning the house (ew). All of these things, and many more have something in common. They do not involve your soul in any way. When you take care of yourself, you make sure that everything in your world is taken care of. Now, don’t hear what I’m not saying! Taking care of yourself is very important, it’s just different than self-care.

To me, self-care means feeding your soul with things that are going to fill you with long-term happiness. When your soul is fed well, your mind is fed well, and you live a happy life!

I will gladly admit that I go to counseling once every two weeks. I love my counselor, and if you aren’t in counseling, YOU NEED TO GO! You don’t even have to have a mental illness, just GO! (shameless self-help plug over). One thing that my counselor tells me time and time again (one day I will listen), is that self-care is absolutely necessary! In the world we live in, you would think that was a blasphemous statement. Oh, how wrong our world is!

Our world is so centered on doing WHATEVER it takes to get to the top. Part of that whatever, has unfortunately become sacrificing our #MentalHealth to do it. I have had some experience in this sense. In college, all I focused on was school. My entire life revolved around my study schedule. No joke: I had a spreadsheet to schedule my FREE time. Like what in the friggin world! Then, my sophomore year, my #Depression and #Anxiety hit me like a dump truck. Now, 6 years later, I am having to learn how to practice self-care, not just taking care of myself

.We, as a society, need to be better about promoting self-care, not just taking care of ourselves. I know there are people out there who think that talking about the soul is some mumbo-jumbo baloney. I respect the heck outta that opinion. However, I am a believer in our soul and mind being connected. We don’t need to make other people feel guilty for restoring their souls a little bit. We need to cheer them on and give them the respect that they deserve!

My wish for 2019 is that everyone can sit down, take a breath, and figure out what truly makes their SOUL happy. Not their mind, their environment, etc.; but their SOUL!

Sarah Hollis

When Your Depression and Anxiety Makes You Feel Like a Burden

Mental illness is extremely tough — both struggling through it yourself, to having a loved one who is struggling with it. I have been on both sides of the coin. Currently, I am dealing with anxiety and depression. I have dealt with it for the past six years, and every single day is a blessing and a curse at the same time. It’s a blessing because I get to live my life with all the amazing people I know and love; a curse because my mental illness creeps in on me in every aspect of my life. With my anxiety and depression, there is one lingering, evil thought I have every single day: I am a burden to others. One of my greatest strengths, as well as my greatest weakness, is that I live to please other people — so much in fact that I forget to take care of myself. Because of that, my anxiety and consequently depression are at all new highs. Something I have learned through all of this is that I need to talk about what I am going through. I believe keeping things inside is the worst possible thing anyone struggling with mental illness can do. You begin to isolate yourself from the world because you feel like nobody can possibly understand what you are going through. You stop reaching out to people because you believe you are going to bring them down with you. Well, guess what? You’re not going to. Let me make something very clear: you are not a burden . I know that is easier to read than to believe; trust me, I do. I am struggling with this very concept right now. It is so hard for me to reach out to my loved ones because I don’t want to interfere with their happiness and well-being. If the people you decide to reach out to really care about you, they will stick with you. If they turn away, then that is their problem. You need to surround yourself with people who are going to bring you up and listen to you in your most desperate times of need. Something my loved ones have reiterated to me repeatedly is that I am not doing any of these things, and hopefully, your trusted people will tell you the same exact thing. If you are experiencing any kind of mental illness, I want to encourage you to keep going and keep talking through it. That is so much easier said than done, I know, but you must take care of yourself. You are the most important person in your life. If you’re not good for yourself, how can you be good for anyone else? If you keep everything in and are afraid you’re going to be a burden to everyone else, you’re not going to get any better. So, go out and don’t be afraid to share your feelings. They are important, and you are so worth listening to. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via pecaphoto77

Sarah Hollis

When Your Depression and Anxiety Makes You Feel Like a Burden

Mental illness is extremely tough — both struggling through it yourself, to having a loved one who is struggling with it. I have been on both sides of the coin. Currently, I am dealing with anxiety and depression. I have dealt with it for the past six years, and every single day is a blessing and a curse at the same time. It’s a blessing because I get to live my life with all the amazing people I know and love; a curse because my mental illness creeps in on me in every aspect of my life. With my anxiety and depression, there is one lingering, evil thought I have every single day: I am a burden to others. One of my greatest strengths, as well as my greatest weakness, is that I live to please other people — so much in fact that I forget to take care of myself. Because of that, my anxiety and consequently depression are at all new highs. Something I have learned through all of this is that I need to talk about what I am going through. I believe keeping things inside is the worst possible thing anyone struggling with mental illness can do. You begin to isolate yourself from the world because you feel like nobody can possibly understand what you are going through. You stop reaching out to people because you believe you are going to bring them down with you. Well, guess what? You’re not going to. Let me make something very clear: you are not a burden . I know that is easier to read than to believe; trust me, I do. I am struggling with this very concept right now. It is so hard for me to reach out to my loved ones because I don’t want to interfere with their happiness and well-being. If the people you decide to reach out to really care about you, they will stick with you. If they turn away, then that is their problem. You need to surround yourself with people who are going to bring you up and listen to you in your most desperate times of need. Something my loved ones have reiterated to me repeatedly is that I am not doing any of these things, and hopefully, your trusted people will tell you the same exact thing. If you are experiencing any kind of mental illness, I want to encourage you to keep going and keep talking through it. That is so much easier said than done, I know, but you must take care of yourself. You are the most important person in your life. If you’re not good for yourself, how can you be good for anyone else? If you keep everything in and are afraid you’re going to be a burden to everyone else, you’re not going to get any better. So, go out and don’t be afraid to share your feelings. They are important, and you are so worth listening to. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via pecaphoto77

Sarah Hollis

When Your Depression and Anxiety Makes You Feel Like a Burden

Mental illness is extremely tough — both struggling through it yourself, to having a loved one who is struggling with it. I have been on both sides of the coin. Currently, I am dealing with anxiety and depression. I have dealt with it for the past six years, and every single day is a blessing and a curse at the same time. It’s a blessing because I get to live my life with all the amazing people I know and love; a curse because my mental illness creeps in on me in every aspect of my life. With my anxiety and depression, there is one lingering, evil thought I have every single day: I am a burden to others. One of my greatest strengths, as well as my greatest weakness, is that I live to please other people — so much in fact that I forget to take care of myself. Because of that, my anxiety and consequently depression are at all new highs. Something I have learned through all of this is that I need to talk about what I am going through. I believe keeping things inside is the worst possible thing anyone struggling with mental illness can do. You begin to isolate yourself from the world because you feel like nobody can possibly understand what you are going through. You stop reaching out to people because you believe you are going to bring them down with you. Well, guess what? You’re not going to. Let me make something very clear: you are not a burden . I know that is easier to read than to believe; trust me, I do. I am struggling with this very concept right now. It is so hard for me to reach out to my loved ones because I don’t want to interfere with their happiness and well-being. If the people you decide to reach out to really care about you, they will stick with you. If they turn away, then that is their problem. You need to surround yourself with people who are going to bring you up and listen to you in your most desperate times of need. Something my loved ones have reiterated to me repeatedly is that I am not doing any of these things, and hopefully, your trusted people will tell you the same exact thing. If you are experiencing any kind of mental illness, I want to encourage you to keep going and keep talking through it. That is so much easier said than done, I know, but you must take care of yourself. You are the most important person in your life. If you’re not good for yourself, how can you be good for anyone else? If you keep everything in and are afraid you’re going to be a burden to everyone else, you’re not going to get any better. So, go out and don’t be afraid to share your feelings. They are important, and you are so worth listening to. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via pecaphoto77

Sarah Hollis

Anxiety and Depression Taught Me to Live in the Present

My journey with anxiety and depression has taught me a lot of different things. These things have one specific theme: enjoy the present moment. For the past six years, this is something I haven’t done well. I still don’t do it well today. My anxiety and depression do everything they can to make sure my present moments are filled with nothing but worry and sadness. My depression keeps me rooted in the past. It makes me think about what I could have done better in past situations I’ve been in. When I get in an argument with someone, I think about how everything that went wrong was my fault. That makes me think less and less of myself until I have very little self-worth. My depression tells me I don’t deserve to live in happiness because I have done so many things wrong in my past. In the depths of my mind, I know that I don’t deserve to dwell in the past. I really do deserve all the happiness that I can find. That’s what mental illness does— it attacks me in the places that it knows it can get to me. It wants to take away any peace and happiness I have. Every single day is a fight to make sure that positivity and good emotions win, but some days, the negativity wins. My anxiety wants to keep me rooted in the future. Don’t get me wrong, thinking about the future is an important thing to do. But for me, thinking about it consumes my thoughts every day and night and I feel like there is no right decision to make. Recently, I got a job and an apartment — total big girl steps for me! Most people would be ecstatic, which I was at first. Then my anxiety began to take over. What if this isn’t where I’m supposed to be? What if my coworkers hate me? What if I do a bad job? These questions consumed my thoughts for at least three weeks before I started my job. I wouldn’t sleep at night because of it. Everything is great now that I’m working — all my fears were for nothing. However, there is always something to worry about in my mind. Living in the present is something that is so hard for me to do because of my mental illnesses. It’s not impossible, but it is difficult. I have to find something unique about every day and set myself in that; like the other day when I went to lunch with my new coworkers for the first time — it was so great! The present is something that I think we sometimes take for granted and it might be especially difficult for those who suffer from anxiety and depression. I think we have to take time and enjoy where we are. If we’re not satisfied with where we are, how are we going to be happy with where we’re going? We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via NataliaDeriabina

Sarah Hollis

When Your Depression and Anxiety Makes You Feel Like a Burden

Mental illness is extremely tough — both struggling through it yourself, to having a loved one who is struggling with it. I have been on both sides of the coin. Currently, I am dealing with anxiety and depression. I have dealt with it for the past six years, and every single day is a blessing and a curse at the same time. It’s a blessing because I get to live my life with all the amazing people I know and love; a curse because my mental illness creeps in on me in every aspect of my life. With my anxiety and depression, there is one lingering, evil thought I have every single day: I am a burden to others. One of my greatest strengths, as well as my greatest weakness, is that I live to please other people — so much in fact that I forget to take care of myself. Because of that, my anxiety and consequently depression are at all new highs. Something I have learned through all of this is that I need to talk about what I am going through. I believe keeping things inside is the worst possible thing anyone struggling with mental illness can do. You begin to isolate yourself from the world because you feel like nobody can possibly understand what you are going through. You stop reaching out to people because you believe you are going to bring them down with you. Well, guess what? You’re not going to. Let me make something very clear: you are not a burden . I know that is easier to read than to believe; trust me, I do. I am struggling with this very concept right now. It is so hard for me to reach out to my loved ones because I don’t want to interfere with their happiness and well-being. If the people you decide to reach out to really care about you, they will stick with you. If they turn away, then that is their problem. You need to surround yourself with people who are going to bring you up and listen to you in your most desperate times of need. Something my loved ones have reiterated to me repeatedly is that I am not doing any of these things, and hopefully, your trusted people will tell you the same exact thing. If you are experiencing any kind of mental illness, I want to encourage you to keep going and keep talking through it. That is so much easier said than done, I know, but you must take care of yourself. You are the most important person in your life. If you’re not good for yourself, how can you be good for anyone else? If you keep everything in and are afraid you’re going to be a burden to everyone else, you’re not going to get any better. So, go out and don’t be afraid to share your feelings. They are important, and you are so worth listening to. We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here . Thinkstock photo via pecaphoto77