U.S. Denies Visa to Woman With Leukemia’s Stem Cell Donor


Update: In a statement released by Rep. Alan Lowenthal, he shared Helen Huynh’s sister has been granted humanitarian parole by the U.S. government to enter the United States for 180 days to take part in a stem cell transplant to treat her sister’s leukemia.

A woman diagnosed with leukemia has a stem-cell donor sister in Vietnam, but the U.S. government has denied her visa application three times.

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The U.S. is denying this woman’s life-saving stem cell transplant.

Helen Huynh has an aggressive form of leukemia.

Doctors say a stem cell transplant can save her, but finding a match is rare.

Fortunately, Huynh’s sister is a 100% match.

But the U.S. won’t let her travel from Vietnam for the procedure.

Tweet: Rep. Alan Lowenthal @RepLowenthal – “I am working with @StateDept and @DHSgov to bring Thuy to Helen as quickly as possible.”

Now, their story is getting attention from the media.

”We have letters from the hospitals stating that she is a match and that she is coming to the U.S. to donate for the stem cell transplant. The letter from the City of Hope stated that they are requesting a medical emergency visa.”

Huynh’s sister would leave behind money, property, and her 5-year-old child,

But the U.S. won’t give her a visa for fear she won’t go back to Vietnam.

“If we were an Italian-American or a Scottish-American, then our family member could just come on the plane and come here anytime. They could come and go to Disneyland if they wanted to. They’re not even looking at the supporting documents or looking at our situation.”

Now, the family is turning to the kindness of strangers.

A GoFundMe account has been set up to help with visa application fees and medical expenses.


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