28 Classic Rock Songs to Listen to When You're Feeling Anxious

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Sometimes, you just need to rock it out.

Music is by no means a cure-all for anxiety, but a quick session of head-banging, air guitar-slaying and full-on belting (mixed with empowering lyrics) can do the body good when it’s feeling particularly anxious. If you’re a classic rock fan who also experiences anxiety, our community has got your back.

We asked our Facebook readers what classic rock songs help them through anxious moments. Here’s their list (a Spotify playlist is at the bottom). Keep calm and rock on.

1. “Take It Easy” by The Eagles

“Just find a place to make your stand, and take it easy.”

Photo of man laying on deck that reads "Just find a place to make your stand, and take it easy."

2. “Sunshine on My Shoulders” by John Denver

“If I had a tale that I could tell you, I’d tell a tale sure to make you smile. If I had a wish that I could wish for you, I’d make a wish for sunshine for the while.”

Photo of book with words that read "If I had a tale that I could tell you, I'd tell a tale sure to make you smile. If I had a wish that I could wish for you, I'd make a wish for sunshine for the while."

3. “Under Pressure” by David Bowie/Queen

“‘Cause love’s such an old-fashioned word, and love dares you to care for the people on the edge of the night, and love dares you to change our way of caring about ourselves.”

Photo of heart that reads "Love dares you to change the way of caring about ourselves."

4. “We Weren’t Born to Follow” by Bon Jovi

“When life is a bitter pill to swallow, you gotta hold on to what you believe.”

Photo of pill, with words that read "When life is a bitter pill to swallow, you gotta hold on to what you believe."

5. “Simple Man” by Lynyrd Skynyrd

“Take your time, don’t live too fast. Troubles will come, and they will pass.”

Photo of road that reads "Take your time, don't live too fast. Troubles will come, and they will pass."

6. “Free Bird” Lynyrd Skynyrd

“‘Cause I’m free as a bird now, and this bird you cannot change.”

Photo of birds flying that reads "'Cause I'm free as a bird now, and this bird you cannot change."

7. “Tender” by Blur

“Come on, come on, come on, get through it. Come on, come on, come on, love’s the greatest thing.”

Photo of blurred hearts that read "Come on, come on, come on, get through it."

8. “Baba O’Riley” by The Who

“Don’t cry, don’t raise your eye. It’s only teenage wasteland.”

Photo of boy looking out at land that reads "Don't cry, don't raise your eye. It's only teenage wasteland."

9. “Roll With the Changes” by REO Speedwagon

“So if you’re tired of the same old story, oh, turn some pages.”

Photo of book that reads "So if you're tired of the same old story, oh, turn some pages."

10. “Don’t Look Back” by Boston

“Don’t look back, a new day is breakin’.”

Photo of sun rising that reads "Don't look back, a new day is breakin'."

11. “Peace of Mind” by Boston

“All I want is to have my peace of mind.”

Girl in field that reads ""All I want is to have my peace of mind."

12. “Old Time Rock and Roll” by Bob Seger

“Still like that old time rock ‘n’ roll. That kind of music just soothes the soul.”

Photo of guitar that reads "That kind of music just soothes the soul."

13. “Don’t Stop Me Now” by Queen

“I’m gonna go, go, go. There’s no stopping me.”

Photo of person running that reads "I'm gonna go, go, go. There's no stopping me."

14. “Freewill” by Rush

“If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.”

Photo of man at fork in the road that reads "I'm gonna go, go, go. There's no stopping me."

15. “Don’t Stop Believin’” by Journey

“Don’t stop believin’, hold on to that feeling.”

Photo of rainbow that reads "Don't stop believin', hold on to that feeling."

16. “Nothing Else Matters” by Metallica

“Life is ours, we live it our way.”

Photo of concert that reads "Life is ours, we live it our way."

17. “Carry on Wayward Son” by Kansas

“Lay your weary head to rest. Don’t you cry no more.”

Photo of moon that reads "Lay your weary head to rest. Don't you cry no more."

18. “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

“And I’ll keep this world from draggin’ me down. Gonna stand my ground, and I won’t back down.”

Photo of dirt that reads "And I'll keep this world from draggin' me down."

19. “Dream On” by Aerosmith

“You got to lose to know how to win.”

Photo of sad man that reads "You got to lose to know how to win."

20. “Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Simon & Garfunkel

“When darkness comes and pain is all around, like a bridge over troubled water, I will lay me down.”

Photo of bridge that reads "like a bridge over troubled water, I will lay me down."

21. “Here I Go Again” by Whitesnake

“And I’ve made up my mind, I ain’t wasting no more time.”

Photo of clock that reads "And I've made up my mind, I ain't wasting no more time."

22. “Up Around the Bend” by Creedence Clearwater Revival

“Always time for good conversation; there’s an ear for what you say.”

Photo of phone that reads "Always time for good conversation; there's an ear for what you say."

23. “Patience” by Guns n’ Roses

“Take it slow, and things will be just fine.”

Photo of person on dock that reads ""Take it slow, and things will be just fine."

24. “Thunder Road” Bruce Sprinsteen

“Hey, what else can we do now? Except roll down the window and let the wind blow back your hair. Well, the night’s busting open, these two lanes will take us anywhere.”

Photo of road that reads "these two lanes will take us anywhere."

25. “Stairway to Heaven” by Led Zeppelin

“But in the long run, there’s still time to change the road you’re on.”

Photo of road that reads ""But in the long run, there's still time to change the road you're on."

26. “Comfortably Numb” Pink Floyd

“I hear you’re feeling down. Well, I can ease your pain and get you on your feet again.”

Photo of feet that reads I can ease your pain and get you on your feet again."

27. “Blackbird” by The Beatles

“Take these broken wings and learn to fly.”

Photo of birds that reads ""Take these broken wings and learn to fly."

28. “Let It Be” by The Beatles

“And when the night is cloudy, there is still a light that shines on me. Shine until tomorrow, let it be.”

Photo of sunrise that reads "Shine until tomorrow, let it be."

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24 Ways to Magically, Totally, 100% Cure Anxiety

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When you live with anxiety, it sometimes feels like everyone has an opinion about how you should manage it.

So we asked our mental health community to share the the most cringe-worthy advice they’ve ever received about dealing with anxiety. Warning: These pieces of advice may elicit eye-rolling, head-shaking, sighing and laughter of disbelief. Hopefully, we can all find the humor in these attempts at helpful advice and learn to be patient with those who may not understand anxiety.

Here’s what they shared:

1. “Put your big girl panties on.” — Nell Hoyle Causey

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2. “Get over it.” — Cambry Clark Huaraque

3. “You’re an intelligent person, you can think you’re way through this.” — Kylie Wagner-Grobman

4. “Christians shouldn’t have anxiety.” — Michelle Oldenburg Fong

5. “Be stronger. It’s all in your head.” — Gabriella de la Vega

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6. “‘Just get out of your head for a while.’ If I could, then this wouldn’t be an issue.” — Katie Sunshine Struble

7. “Suck it up.” — Serena Leblond

8.There’s someone out there worse off than you.” — Maria Kumler Mason

9. “Stop feeling sorry for yourself.” — Vickie Boyette

10. “Have a drink.” — Lori Simpson

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11.Essential oils will cure you.” — Misty Hyndman

12. “Get a grip.” — Jessica Coons

13. “Get a backbone.” — Heather Quintana

14. “Think happy thoughts.” — Melanie Tapia

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15.Just let it go.” — Sandie Soule

16. “A clinical psychologist once told me to, ‘Just shut your eyes and think of something else and in a matter of minutes it will disappear!’ I was stunned and simply smiled.” — Kimberley Giles

17.You do not look sick. Just take your mind off things. Anyone can do it.” — Mel Rowe 

18. “Visualize the ocean.” — Amy Mae Tuininga

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19. “Just don’t think about it.” — Tiffany Davidson

20.If you really wanted to, you could just snap out of it.” — Jessica Owens Lloyd

21.Pull yourself up by your bootstraps.” — Penny Crittenden

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22. “Grow up. It’s not like you’re dying.” — Ashley Martin

23. “‘Put aside your worries for a little bit.’ Oh, I cant just turn it off and on like a light switch.” — Jessica Ann Hardy

24. “Just try harder.” — Amy Coleman

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*Answers have been edited and shortened.

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19 Things Students With Anxiety Wish Their Teachers Understood

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With all the pressure put on students to succeed academically, participate in extracurriculars and maintain a social life, it’s no wonder more than 80 percent of college students reported feeling overwhelmed by all they had to do this past year. For students who live with high anxiety or anxiety disorders, this pressure can be amplified and more difficult to manage. According to Active Minds, “Mental health issues in the college student population, such as depression, anxiety, and eating disorders, are associated with lower GPA and higher probability of dropping out of college.”

But when the pressure’s on, teachers have an opportunity to make a difference. Active Minds and The Mighty asked students who live with anxiety what they wish their teachers understood.

Here’s what they had to say:

1. “I wish they knew when I lacked in participation, it wasn’t because I didn’t care. I often enjoyed the subjects I was learning. I just physically couldn’t handle the assignments thrown my way. I wish they knew how often I vomited and shook knowing I’d have to face them the next day and let them know I hadn’t completed my assignment, yet again.” — Marissa Lynette Berube

A blonde, white woman hold her hand over her face. Text reads: "I wish they knew when I lacked in participation, it wasn't because I didn't care."

 

2.I wish they’d tell students it’s OK to come to them if they’re struggling because of anxiety. Because there’s such a stigma surrounding talking about mental health, I never know which professors will be understanding and which will think I’m just making ‘excuses.’” — Emily Prather

3. “I wish some of my teachers would have some compassion instead of assuming everything is just an excuse.” — Jen Hayes

Books are stacked. The text reads: "I wish some of my teachers would have some compassion instead of assuming everything is just an excuse."

4. “I wish my professor had known it wasn’t just a matter of adjusting to grad school. It was serious.” — Jennifer Rowe

5. “I wish my teachers understood putting me on the spot to answer a question, when I didn’t have my hand raised, isn’t helping me gain confidence. Confidence and competence have nothing to do with the situation. I am smart. I am paying attention. I don’t need to have a spotlight over my head to prove it.” — Tricia Rathgeber

6. “I wish it was easier to have absences excused. I’d much rather stay home than go and cry in class. That’s not an exaggeration by the way. I’ve had panic attacks in the classroom where I just couldn’t stop crying.” — Lee Dralling

7. “I’m finally graduating this semester after six years, but I feel like everyone thinks I’m making up excuses or I’m lazy. I literally get paralyzed with anxiety, and I can’t even get out of bed. I wish people understood it’s just as real as the flu or… anything else. It’s not something we’re making up because we procrastinated.” — Jessica Sprayberry

A male student wit dark hair sits at his computer wearing a sweater. Text reads: "It's not something we're making up because we procrastinated."

8. “When you put me on the spot to stand in front of the class, my performance is absolutely not an indicator of what I’ve learned. As you can see my by tests, quizzes and paperwork grades, I’m learning a lot. All of that goes straight out the window when you ask me to demonstrate on the spot.” — Alex Wickham

9. “My 12-year-old son who has anxiety said, ‘I sometimes wish they would just give me a moment to collect my thoughts. I know the answers but I need to take a breath before I give it.’” — Becky Burrier

10. “The one thing a teacher should understand is that calling on a student with social anxiety is a nightmare. Calling on students with social anxiety does not help them overcome it!” — Autism – Doesn’t Come With Instructions

11. “When I abruptly leave the room, please don’t make it a big deal.” — Paige Johnson

Chalkboard with text that reads: "When I abruptly leave the room, please don't make it a big deal."

12. “Sometimes I’m going to need to ask you to repeat instructions for an assignment several times. Please don’t make me feel bad about it. I just need to affirm to myself that I heard you right the first time.” — Nichole Cherin

13. “I’m not lazy. I try my hardest. I’m not lying. I do everything I can. Anxiety isn’t something I just made up one day.” — Lexie Sittsamer

14. “Usually it strikes out of nowhere and I have no control over it. I’m not trying to get out of anything or trying to get attention. I feel like I’m going to die when my panic starts and can only calm down if allowed to escape to a quiet spot. Then I can calm myself down and return to class.” — Anita Contreras Munoz

15. “I wish they knew how much time, dedication, tears, breakdowns and energy it can take to get an assignment done. But also how great it feels when you succeed!” — Jennifer Scinto

Hands are raised in a classroom. Text reads: "I wish they knew how much time, dedication, tears, breakdowns and energy it can take to get an assignment done."

16. “I have an intense fear of giving the wrong answer to a question out loud. So if I get it wrong, please realize how much courage it took to say anything, and don’t laugh at me.” — Chelsea Noelani Gober

17. “When I got in trouble in school, I wasn’t trying to be a ‘bad kid’ and it wasn’t a ‘phase.’ I needed help, and I needed someone to recognize that.” — Liv Raimonde

18. “My inability to function at times is not a result of laziness, procrastination or sheer lack of willpower.” — Christian Cochran

19. “I might be too scared to come to you. If you see me struggling, please say something.” — Ashleigh Young

A teacher writes on a chalkboard. Text reads: "I might be too scared to come to you. If you see me struggling, please say something."

*Answers have been edited and shortened. 

Want to start an Active Minds chapter at your school? Click here to learn more. 

Related: 34 Mental Health Tips Every Incoming Freshman Needs to Hear

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21 Texts to Send People With Anxiety When They Need It Most

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When you’re having a rough moment, a rough hour or an entire anxiety-ridden day, one friendly reminder may help turn it all around, or at least remind you that you’re not alone. To find out what people who live with anxiety need to hear in tough moments, we asked our Mighty readers who live with anxiety to tell us one text message they’d love to receive when they’re feeling overwhelmed.

If you have a friend or loved one who lives with anxiety, this may be exactly what they need to hear right now: 

1. “I’m always here for you if you need to talk.”

 

A text that reads: "I'm always here for you if you need to talk."

2. “How can I help?” 

A text that reads: "How can I help?"

3. “Just wanted to let you know you’re not alone in this.”

A text that reads, "Just wanted to let you know you're not alone in this."

4. “Thinking of you.”

A text that reads: "Thinking of you."

5. “I believe in you. You can and will get through this.” 

A text that reads: "I believe in you. You can and will get through this."
6. “You won’t feel this way forever. I promise.” 

Text that reads: "You won't feel this way forever. I promise."

7. “I love you…anxiety and all.”

A text that reads: "I love you...anxiety and all."

8. “Want me to come over and hang out?”

A text that reads: "Want me to come over and hang out?"

9. “It’s not your fault.”

A text that reads: "It's not your fault."

10. “You are and will always be enough.”

A text that reads: "You are and will always be enough."

11. “I’m bringing dinner.”

A text that reads: "I'm bringing dinner."

12. “I’ll always be there for you.”

A text that reads: "I will always be there for you."

13. “You’re safe.”

A text that reads: "You're safe."

14. “Remember to take a break!” 

A text that reads: "Remember to take a break!" with a smiley emoji.

15. “You’re not imagining this.”

A text that reads: "You're not imagining this."

16. “There’s a Netflix episode and a delicious meal waiting for you at home.”

A text that reads: "There's a Netflix episode and a delicious meal waiting for you at home."

17. “Do you need a break?”

A text that reads: "Do you need a break?"

18. “Take your time to feel OK. The universe will wait for you.”

A text that reads: "Take your time to feel OK. The universe will wait for you."

19. “No matter what, know I love you regardless.”

A text that reads: "No matter what, know that I love you regardless."

20. “You are and will always be enough.”

A text that reads: "You are and will always be enough."

21. “You are stronger than anything you are afraid of.”

A text that reads: "You are stronger than anything you are afraid of."

Related: 26 Pieces of Advice That Have Actually Helped People With Mental Illness

 

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Comic Strip Uses Humor to Tackle Everyday Challenges of Anxiety

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An artist found comfort and catharsis by making comics about her mental health challenges.

Comic strip depicting "real life horror movies."
Courtesy of Gemma Correll

Gemma Correll, 30, is a British illustrator living in California. She’s been drawing comics since she was a child and started making her own when she was 9 and selling them at school for 20 cents. Correll continued to draw throughout high school and eventually went to art school. Now she works as a full time illustrator, so she draws comics for fun on the side.

Comic showing "Adventures in Depressionland"
Courtesy of Gemma Correll

Correll’s comics about her daily life naturally evolved to include her challenges with anxiety and depression.

“It seemed dishonest almost not to include these things which were, and are, a big part of my life,” she told The Mighty in an email.

Pasta shapes with names like "Downward Spirals"
Courtesy of Gemma Correll

The reaction Correll got to her work encouraged her to keep going and taught her that many people could relate to what she was going through.

“I was hesitant to share them at first, but when I did, the response I got showed me that I was far from the only person suffering from these problems,” she told The Mighty. “When you suffer from anxiety and depression, you can feel very alone but I think it helps to see that you’re not the only one suffering.”

Real life "Anxie-trees." Trees with names like "Weeping Willow."
Courtesy of Gemma Correll

Correll says a sense of humor has helped her cope with her mood disorders and she hopes her comics help others see the humor in their situation as well.

The cover of Correll's book, called "The Worrier's Guide to Life."
The cover of Correll’s book. Courtesy of Gemma Correll

“I hope people can see the humor I use is coming from a place of understanding and empathy,” Correll told The Mighty. “I’m not trying to mock or undermine mental health problems — far from it. I’ve always used humor to work through and cope with my own problems. I really think it’s helpful and cathartic.”

You can purchase a copy of Correll’s book here, or visit her website and Tumblr page for more of her work.

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Study Suggests New Explanation for Higher Anxiety Rates in Women

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A new study suggests the implications of paying women less than men aren’t just financial — they also take a toll on mental health.

Women are twice as likely to experience anxiety and depression as men are, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. A new study from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Department of Epidemiology suggests this disparity may be partially due to the wage gap.

The study, published in the January issue of the journal “Social Science & Medicine,” used data from a 2001–2002 U.S. survey of 22,581 working adults, ages 30–65, to explore the gender disparity in mood disorders.

Researchers found that where female income was less than the matched male counterpart, odds of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were significantly higher among women versus men. The odds of depression were nearly two-and-a-half times higher, and odds of anxiety were more than four times higher. However, when a woman’s income was greater than her male counterpart, her odds for having anxiety or depression was almost equivalent to a man’s.

Past research has looked at biological factors such as hormonal differences to explain the gender disparity in mood disorder diagnoses, but this new study suggests the reasons behind it may be more related to social treatment.

“Our findings suggest that policies must go beyond prohibiting overt gender discrimination,” said Katherine Keyes, assistant professor of Epidemiology and senior author of the paper. “While it is commonly believed that gender differences in depression and anxiety are biologically rooted, these results suggest that such differences are much more socially constructed than previously thought, indicating that gender disparities in psychiatric disorders are malleable and arise from unfair treatment.”

Policies such as paid parental leave, affordable childcare and flexible work schedules may help lessen the disparity, although the study’s authors say more research into understanding the ways in which discrimination plays a role in mental health is required.

“The social processes that sort women into certain jobs, compensate them less than equivalent male counterparts and create gender disparities in domestic labor that have material and psychosocial consequences,” said Jonathan Platt, a PhD student and co-author of the paper. “If women internalize these negative experiences as individual-level issues, rather than the result of structural discrimination, they may be at increased risk for depression and anxiety disorders.”

To see the full paper, go here

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