To the Person Who Parked in Between the Handicapped Spots


Dear Sir in the Honda Accord,

You’ve illegally parked and stolen not one but two handicapped parking spots. By parking in the bright yellow crossed-out section of pavement, you’ve blocked off accessibility for anyone who needs to remove medical equipment from their vehicle. Those lines you wedged your sedan into are there so disabled individuals have plenty of space to carefully remove their devices without harming themselves or others in the process. 

Does it look like someone could even open their wheelchair-accessible van door, let alone lower a wheelchair onto the pavement? The answer is no.

car parked illegally

Does it look like a patient who has mobility issues could lug their bulky walker out of their door without hitting the side of your incorrectly parked car? The answer again is no. 

You’ve taken away a day at the mall for not one but two individuals. But worst of all, sir, is that you yourself had a handicap placard hanging from your rearview mirror. Knowing what these precious spots are for and how much freedom they can bring to disabled individuals, you still chose to take park unlawfully.

Did you stop to think about those other cars already parked there? What if their owners had to wait out in the rain for you to return so they could get their equipment back in their vehicles, unable to simply leave after a day which probably caused a good amount of fatigue? I’m disappointment that someone who needs an accessible stall chose to set such a bad example of those who wield handicap placards. 

As a young adult bound to a heavy and quite cumbersome oxygen tank, those coveted spots are the only way I can safely exit my vehicle. Without those spacious yellow lines I cannot maneuver my tank out of the door, leaving me headed home if no spots are readily available. Imagine if I’d come out to you parked next to me in this illicit manner, unable to now get back in my car. Supplemental oxygen tanks only last so long, sir, and I plan my outings around the amount of oxygen I know I have available. The detour you would be forcing me to take honestly puts my health at risk — and that is not acceptable.

This kind of behavior is the reason many of us are persecuted by society, why patients get talked down to and accused of “faking it” even when they have a placard. Your wish for a spot closer to the mall entrance proved to everyone who saw your car parked on those unmistakable yellow lines that handicap spots are abused, even by those they’re designed for. Your negligence to follow simple parking guidelines encourages observers to judge those of use who need these parking stalls, and even worse, potentially harms handicapped individuals.

Next time, sir, please be respectful, and try to think of the implications your choices have on others, and the message you are sending to onlookers. 

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