When a Parent of a Child Just Diagnosed With Autism Asked Me What to Do


As someone on the autism spectrum, I’m always trying to advocate for myself. I love to help others when I can and share information and knowledge of what my life is like. My hope is that people can learn from what I’ve been through and apply it to what may help someone else on the spectrum.

Sometimes, I think I’m pretty much set with understanding autism. But I’m constantly reminded this is far from the truth. I only understand my own autism.

I was reminded of this when a parent of a child who was recently diagnosed asked what they should do. I was about to answer the question, but I didn’t quite know how to answer it right away. I sat there for a second and thought about it. If I had a child who was recently diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum, what would I do first? I didn’t know what I would do. Suddenly, I began to understand.

All of this time, I wondered why some parents became so upset with the diagnosis of their child. What is so upsetting about it? Their child hasn’t changed. Don’t they love their child the way they are?

But when I was faced with the same idea and having to answer that question, I finally understood. I began to feel so overwhelmed. There was just so much information and no way to know what was right for that specific child. Who should they ask? What question should they ask first?

I came to a very simple conclusion. If your child has just received an autism spectrum diagnosis, the first thing you probably need to do is just take it in. Just sit. Breathe. Don’t let all of the negative thoughts in your head. Understand that things are going to be different from what you thought they would be like. Then sit and breathe again. Remember that it’s OK to take things slowly and ask for help.

Remember that you don’t have to face things alone.

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