When a Boy Ignored a Mom’s Warning to ‘Back Away’ During My Brother’s Meltdown


To the mother screaming when my brother was having meltdown,

Back away! Get back!” you scream as my 11-year-old brother is having a meltdown at the zoo.

My brother has nonverbal autism that comes along with sensory processing disorder and many meltdowns. We decided to go to the zoo with my sister, brother, ABA therapist and respite worker. I have no fear taking my brother out to public places and really don’t mind what people might think, but something about this situation made me tick. As we were trying to calm my brother, all I could think about was you screaming at your child and other people to back away despite my brother being in a transport chair.

I understand you wanted people to give us space and keep everyone safe, but bringing attention to the situation like that was only making the meltdown worse. I understand you wanted to help, but when you scream at your child, who I assume by his curiosity had most likely never seen a meltdown before, to back up, he may view my brother as a dangerous person. My brother is not by any means a dangerous person, and I was amazed as another child came close to us.

As you were screaming for him to back up, he asked me if my brother was OK. I told him yes, my brother was having a rough time, but he was going to be laughing soon. His next statement was surprising and left me in shock. “I have rough times, too — especially with math.” The parents smiled at me, called the child back, and off went the child. Yes, my brother can have some intense meltdowns, but what you did not see before was a boy smiling with chocolate ice cream all over his mouth, a boy laughing at a bird pooping on his brother’s shoulder, a boy who was excited to go to the zoo.

Two brothers walking hand in hand at the zoo both wearing t-shirts that read Raising Autism Awareness One Step At A Time
Zachary and his brother in autism awareness T-shirts.

My brother’s meltdowns are a small part of his life, a small part of his day you unfortunately had to experience. Every meltdown can be a learning experience for my brother, for my family and me, and everyone who witnesses it such as you and your son. One child gained insight about my brother, and your son could have, too, if you gave him the chance.

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