Disneyland Staffer Desperate to Find Autistic Guest Who Lost This Lanyard


Emily Gibby, an employee at Disneyland in Anaheim, California, is trying to find an autistic patron who lost a lanyard near the park last week.

One of Gibby’s colleagues found the lanyard at the Disneyland Hotel on March 24 and passed it on to Gibby, a Disney spokesperson told KTLA. The badge attached to the lanyard has a note which reads, “Hello! I am autistic, and I don’t talk much, but I would like to trade for Mickey pins!”

Gibby posted a photo of the lanyard on her Facebook page, adding that she and her co-workers decorated it with even more pins and a medallion.

Alright Cast Members I need your help! This morning during the pin release I was working, we found this red lanyard with…

Posted by Emily Fuller Gibby on Thursday, March 24, 2016

 

Gibby wrote:

Alright Cast Members I need your help! This morning during the pin release I was working, we found this red lanyard with four pins on it. It had a white note attached that said “hello I am autistic and I don’t talk much but I would like to trade for Mickey pins.” So we did what any Cast Member would naturally do.. We filled up his lanyard with Mickey pins and got him a Mickey medallion as well! But now we need everyone’s help in finding him/her!! Share this post and help us find our friend! Be on the look out! Multiple lines of business have already been contacted and informed that we have this lanyard at Pin Traders for him/her! Let’s work some magic and try to find our friend!!

Many individuals with autism have sensory issues and may grow very attached to certain objects, or parts of objects, according to The National Autistic Society.

“I have always known that people with autism have daily struggles that some of us will never realize, but recently I have learned that something as small as losing a possession could drastically change their day, week, or even their month,” Gibby wrote in a post on April 2. “Losing a small item could lead to large behavioral changes and meltdowns that can not be solved by just ‘buying a new one.’”

“With so many big things happening all around the world, it’s important to remember the little things that might be really big things to a certain person,” Gibby posted April 1.

If you have any information that might help, contact Disneyland’s lost and found department at (714) 817-2166.

h/t Huffington Post

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