What 'Finding Dory' Taught Me as Someone on the Autism Spectrum


I’m a huge fan of Ellen DeGeneres, so I was more than excited to see her new movie “Finding Dory” on opening night. I arrived so early that I waited in my car for an extra hour (OK, maybe two hours) before I even entered the theater! I got my snacks and picked my seat, ready to watch. But I had no idea the movie I was about to see would hit me so close to home.

As someone on the autism spectrum, I found I could really relate to Dory. Not because of her notoriously poor memory; in fact, my memory is incredible. No, I could relate to her because of how she felt about herself.

Throughout the movie, Dory is constantly apologizing for being forgetful. Constantly. And I could truly feel for her. She just wishes she could remember things, but she can’t.

So yes, I have an amazing memory. Yet, I still have major deficits. I struggle to understand things socially. Or I need extra help with things that come very easily to others. And I feel so bad about it at times, especially when it affects other people. I’m constantly apologizing, too. There are honestly moments I wish I wasn’t on the autism spectrum.

But I am.

“Finding Dory” teaches people that it’s good to be different. It’s OK to struggle sometimes. And for that reason, I could truly relate to Dory. I often feel like I’m not capable of doing things. But when I saw this movie, I cried. I cried because I realized I wasn’t alone. I cried because I finally realized many people feel like they aren’t good enough. But this movie reminds us that we are.

We just have to remember to keep swimming.

The Mighty is asking the following: Describe a scene or line from a movie, show, or song that’s stuck with you through your experience with disability, disease or mental illness. Check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines.

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