John Cena’s ‘Love Has No Labels’ PSA Inspires Me as Someone on the Autism Spectrum


“This year patriotism shouldn’t be about pride of country. It should be about love.” – John Cena


This was one of the main messages WWE superstar John Cena shared during a new Ad Council ad titled, “We Are America” that aired on the Fourth of July as part of the Love Has No Labels campaign. In the PSA, Cena is seen walking around a small town speaking straight to the camera about what it means to be patriotic.

One of the statistics he said that really resonated with me is that there are currently 319 million U.S. citizens, 27 million of them are disabled (Editor’s note: While this is the stat in the PSA, it may not be factual. In the U.S. 27 million women are disabled, but it’s estimated 53 million adults have a disability in the country) — and almost half the country belongs to minority groups. As someone who currently lives with a disability in autism, I believe these statistics truly show how diverse of a community we actually have. These are numbers I constantly share in my community as a disability advocate.

I’m inspired by John Cena for taking the time out to do this PSA because it shows us all we are not alone in this effort to spread acceptance for people who may be considered slightly different than the norm. I thank him for using his celebrity and platform to support the cause and making a difference for those who may be considered different.

A line in the PSA that Cena said couldn’t be anymore true: “This year, patriotism shouldn’t just be about pride of country, it should be about love. Love beyond age, disability, sexuality, race, religion and any other labels, because the second any of us judge people based on those labels, we’re not really being patriotic, are we?”

For me, this message is not something we should only be promoting as part of Fourth of July but all year round. Not only in America but around the world. He concludes by saying, “Remember to love America is to love all Americans because love has no labels.”

I hope you will remember this message every day because our community will be much better for it.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Related to Autism Spectrum Disorder

Young mother working with her baby at home

What My Employer Did Right When My Son Was Diagnosed With Autism

Before I became my own boss, I had a great employer. But what makes an employer great? After my son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, it quickly became clear my work travel schedule was going to be a problem. I had hoped he would eventually adapt, and realized adaptation was not going to come easily [...]
Jackie Marquette's son, Trent

10 Things I've Learned as My Son With Autism Transitioned to Adulthood

My immediate survival mode kicks in when my 39-year-old son, Trent, stands in front of me looking deep into my eyes, saying, “Big hug,” then asks me what his day will look like. This was his life eight months ago, which was much different than the last 15 years. Transition doesn’t only happen when high [...]
Courtnie Rederick's son, Bam Bam

What We Do to Help Our Son on the Autism Spectrum Sleep at Night

Sleep has always been difficult for my son, Bam Bam. Before his autism diagnosis, I remember going to the pediatrician’s office on what seemed like a monthly basis trying to seek answers in regards to why my baby wouldn’t sleep at night. My oldest son, May May, has always been a sleeper and still is. [...]
silhouettes of family in airport ready for departure

To the 'Cool Guy' on the Plane Who Realized My Son Has Autism

We arrive at Burlington Airport. At this point in my son’s life, “The Cat in the Hat” is everything to him. He has the book, the movie, the t-shirt. He runs to the gift store and demands I purchase him a Cat in the Hat Pop Up book for $47.95. I comply because I believe this may [...]