Someone playing Pokemon Go, who found Pikachu

How Pokemon Go Is Making the World Larger for My Son With Autism


We have gone to the same beach house rental every summer for the past six years. Every year, my now 10-year-old son Jack who has autism and anxiety hates to leave the house. He gets anxious when we do new things or go to places he hasn’t been. He could barely tolerate the beach. It is too hot, too sandy, too wet, too windy. It is sensory overload. If we can get him to go on the beach, it is short-lived and one of us has rushed to get him back to the house before or during a meltdown.

The last summer we were here, walking on the boardwalk was filled with anxiety and the fear of people looking at him and following him. I explained that everyone was just walking to the same place, they were not following him. It didn’t matter what I said; he was happiest when he was in the house. He has three older siblings, so we would take turns staying at the house with him.

This year, the day before we were to leave, my 17-year-old daughter showed him the Pokemon Go game. He was hooked. He asked to walk up to the library, the ball field, the school. My child who hates to leave the house is asking to not only to leave it, but to walk!  I was intrigued, so he explained the app to me. This is the best app ever! The next morning when we left for vacation, there was very little stressing. It was filled with excitement and anticipation of what Pokemon we could catch along the way.

Rest stops are no longer feared with people looking at him and food he won’t eat; they are potential Pokemon catching spots. The beach was where you could catch water Pokemon, so off to the beach he went. In the process, he had fun at the beach. He built sand castles with his sister. He laughed playing in the waves. I watched as he slowly began to trust holding onto his father as he went a little further into the water.

For six years I have watched other families play in the ocean with their kids. This was the first time I got to watch my son play in the waves, and scream with excitement. He would look to me for reassurance now and then, but mostly he was making sure I wasn’t missing what he accomplished.

Jack has asked to walk the boardwalk multiple times a day. On the first day of vacation, a teenager was stopped by a bench on the boardwalk. He looked up at my son and said “Did you catch the Pidgey?” I watched as my son almost made eye contact with this boy and said yes. Jack quickly looked away, back at his phone, but I could see the pride on his face. He was succeeding at something cool. He was just as good as this random teenager at catching Pokemon.

One night I told Jack we were going to try walking a different way home from the boardwalk. He was not happy with me. I could tell he was getting stressed. It wasn’t the “normal” way we walked home, it was different. He began to talk rapidly, as he does when he is stressed. I almost suggested we turn back and go the “normal” way home, when an Ivysaur Pokemon appeared on his phone. We stopped walking, he caught it, and magically his anxiety started to dissipate. He was caught up in the excitement of catching that Pokemon; it no longer mattered that we were walking on a different street home.

My son has a very limited diet, and he has a hard time tolerating sitting at a table with unfamiliar food and smells. Going out to eat almost always ends with a meltdown. We would have someone stay back at the house with him, or take turns eating while someone sat in the car with him.

This year we all went to a restaurant that had outside dining. We were able to get a table and sit outside on a porch. My son was able to walk up and down in front of the restaurant where we could keep an eye on him catching Pokemon, while the rest of us leisurely ate our meal.

Tonight as Jack and I were walking back home from yet another trip to the boardwalk, a group of preteen kids on bikes stopped near us, shouting as they were trying to catch a Bulbasaur. Instead of turning away and hoping they wouldn’t notice him, Jack pulled out his phone and proceeded to catch the Bulbasaur too.  The kids rode off on their bikes, but Jack felt included, for he too was searching for Pokemon.

Jack asked me if people in Antarctica were looking for Pokemon. I didn’t know if they were, but what I do know is that Pokemon Go has made my son’s world larger… Thank you Pikachu!

The Mighty is asking the following: What was one moment you received help in an unexpected or unorthodox way related to disability, disease or mental illness? Check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines.

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How Google Street View Helped My Driving as Person on the Autism Spectrum


Learning to drive as someone on the autism spectrum was difficult enough. It took me years of practicing in familiar places before I could comfortably drive around my local area.

But then I wanted to be able to go further. People weren’t always around to be able to show me how to get to new places. I don’t remember street names very well, and GPS is extremely distracting to me. It’s hard to listen to the voice and process what it’s telling me to do. So I had to find a different way to expand my driving routes.

This is where Google comes in. More specifically, Google Street View. Some people may have used it as a way to virtually explore their favorite landmarks. But I used it to become more independent as a person on the spectrum.

Any time I wanted to go to a new place, I would pull it up on Google Maps. I’d look to see the furthest point on the map that I knew I could drive to. And then, I had to trust Street View to lead me to my destination. I’d slowly and virtually “drive” down the street, picking out my visual landmarks to help me know when I would turn or how far I was going. I could turn it nearly 360 degrees to see both sides of the street or what I had passed. I could even zoom in on some signs to read what they said.

All of this was so helpful for me in expanding my driving range. I’ve used Google Street View to get to sensory friendly movies, out of the county and even just out of the state!

I may be a bit limited by things like construction zones or large, multi-lane highways. But now I know how to get around without having to rely on another person to show me the way. And that kind of independence is the best thing that Google could give me.

What’s a part of your condition you live with every day that others might not see? Explain what that experience feels like. Check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines.

Lead photo source: Thinkstock Images

Pokemon Go

The Upside of Playing Pokemon Go as a Person on the Autism Spectrum


I’ve never been a fan of Pokemon. I had one card when I was in elementary school (And for those who are wondering, it was only Diglett, which was given to me as a throwaway card.) I have always felt it was a bit weird and confusing. And to some extent, it still is a bit confusing to me.

But then suddenly, there was a lot of hype about a new app called Pokemon Go. It was all I saw on social media. I was really curious to see why it was so popular. So one night, when I was a bit bored, I decided to download it.

I guess I’d call myself a fan now. Of course, I heed the warnings and watch where I’m walking. And I never catch Pokemon while I’m driving. I really don’t like how the game has me so obsessed so much that I can barely focus on everyday life. But there has been a major upside to playing the game.

Not only have I gotten more physical exercise from walking around everywhere, but I’ve found a way to get past the social anxiety and social skill deficits I have as someone on the autism spectrum. I’m talking to people I would otherwise not know how to strike up a conversation with. Instead of smiling nervously and then simply continuing on, I’m finding the courage to speak up and say “Hey, have you found Pikachu yet?”

And while the game’s popularity will probably die down and my everyday life will eventually settle into my old routine, I’m hoping I’ve learned something from this experience. I’m hoping I’ve learned a few ways to meet new people. I may never find Pikachu. But perhaps the game will help me find a new human friend.

What’s a part of your condition you live with every day that others might not see? Explain what that experience feels like. Check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines.

Microphone over a blurred photo of a conference hall

Why I Speak With Schools Around the World About Autism


The transition to school can be a challenging time for anyone. When you add having a diagnosis of autism and/or other special needs, though, it may be overwhelming. This is the main reason I want to become a champion for the cause in our schools. This is where my story begins of wanting to speak in our schools.

When I was diagnosed with autism at 4, I was just starting pre-k. My parents had to transition to helping me find supports while I had to transition to going to school for the first time. Ever since that day, I knew I was special, although it wouldn’t be until I was 11 that I learned I had an autism spectrum disorder.

My early years were difficult to say the least. Between being overweight and dealing with sensory overload and extreme shyness, I never wanted to be around any of my peers. It didn’t take long until I was bullied for being different. Until I went out of district in the fifth grade, I was one of the only kids with autism in my classrooms.

I look back at that scared kid who didn’t really understand the world around him, and that’s why today I have a passion for spreading education about autism to our students. I grew up a victim of bullying and not understanding my diagnosis. After becoming a professional certified speaker a few years ago, I now have a resume that has given me the opportunities to
speak at school assemblies and paraprofessional events to make the entire school community aware about autism.

Each school has taught me something different that I’ve been able to put towards my talks and presentations. Through my presentations, and seeing a need for mentors, I became a mentor to high school students on the autism spectrum to prepare them for adulthood.

If any educator ever reads this, I hope you will understand that more and more kids will likely know someone with autism. When that happens, I hope we can answer some of their questions and help break down barriers of ignorance to help protect our kids.

I grew up feeling different, but now I know I’m different and not less. Hopefully we can make our students feel the same.

A version of this post originally appeared on Kerrymagro.com.

Lead photo source: Thinkstock Images

What YouTube Means to Me as an Autistic Teenager


Today, social media affects almost everyone on a daily basis. I think there are people in this world who think social media brings more harm than good, whether it’s cyber bullying, not having enough followers, you can’t seem to take the right picture or just don’t feel good enough compared to other people.

Yes, this can be the case for many people who join social media, but it’s a lot different for me as a 15-year-old with high-functioning autism.

I had known about YouTube for a long time, but when I saw my first YouTube video back in 2008, I never thought it would become one of my favorite things. When I was 11, I picked up a mascara for the first time, which started my spiral of makeup obsession.

Sophia Digirolamo

I wanted to learn more, so I turned to YouTube because I didn’t know anyone who could teach me. Once I turned to YouTube, I found this amazing community of men and woman who taught people how to apply makeup. I knew from then on I wanted to be a part of this group.

At the time, I was struggling with a new diagnosis that made me feel like my life was over. I was diagnosed with autism the year before, which my family and I didn’t know anything about. I was going to a school with a very weak special ed system, and my grades were plummeting. And the bullying was so extensive that I was contemplating suicide at only the age of 10.

Since I didn’t have any friends to hang out with, I spent most of my time on YouTube. I would spend hours a day playing with makeup and trying new looks from different tutorials. And I really started to get to know the people who were teaching me. I really felt like I knew these people, and they seemed like friends even though I had never talked to them. The fact that they made these videos just for complete strangers to learn from was so helpful to me and still is.

After about a year, I went to a new school where the kids actually accepted me. My grades went up, and I was happy, which was something I hadn’t felt in a long time.

Once I was in my new school, I decided I was ready to start posting my own videos. Looking back on those videos, I understand why no one watched them because they were pretty awful! But as time went on, I got a real camera and an editing system, which is when I really got serious about YouTube.

I also started to try out new styles of makeup. I did things that were more dramatic and even tried some SFX makeup, which was huge for me because I’ve never been able to watch horror movies. Anything gory didn’t agree with me. Everything I learned about makeup came from YouTube. Other than that, I’m completely self-taught.

Slowly, I started to grow a small following and became friends with other content creators across the country. I realized these are real people. They’re not perfect, they’re not robots, they’re people just like me who have gone through similar things and have similar hobbies.

Through YouTube, I have learned so many social cues and have grown so much socially. I used to be very shy, but now I can’t go a day without talking to more then one friend, whether on Skype or in real life.

And surprisingly, I don’t get many hate comments. I still have a small audience on YouTube, but they’re a nice group of people who support me. And I’ve met a lot of mothers of autistic children after I started a small support group for moms when I was 13. They’re really interested in my life as an autistic teenager, and I talk with them about what they can look forward to as their children get older.

Now I have friends all over the world due to the fact that I have put my work out there to teach other people the art of makeup. And this year, I entered a huge makeup competition called the NYX Face Awards. I didn’t make it to the top 30, but I made a video that challenged me more than anything, and I’m very proud of it. I’ll definitely enter again, and my work will be even better than before.

Being on YouTube has changed me in so many ways for the better. I would have never discovered my passion for makeup if I never went on YouTube. I would have never become friends with such beautiful people, and I would probably still be facing challenges.

If you take care of an autistic child, please do not limit them. Do not underestimate the power of a YouTube video because YouTube changed my life. I don’t know where I would be without it.

Follow Sophia Digirolamo on her YouTube channel.

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page. 

If you need support right now, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255

To My Autistic Son's New Teacher, Before the First Day of School


Dear teacher,

You are going to be my son’s teacher for this upcoming school year. He is an amazing little boy who has grown by leaps and bounds. He is funny, he loves to dance and he has a passion for music.

My son wants to be accepted by his peers. This can be a challenge at times, because my son does has difficulty with personal space. Children may think he is being mean when really he is just trying to get their attention. You see, my son is on the autism spectrum and also has ADHD. My son has difficulties with transition, self-regulation and impulsiveness. With all of this being said, you would be absolutely amazed if you saw where my son was a couple of years ago and where he is today.

The author's son in a classroom

Two years ago my son barely spoke. This caused him to have meltdowns because he had difficulty expressing himself. He also could not stay on task for longer than two minutes at a time. Today, my son’s speech is in the average range, and he can often stay engaged for the entirety of a school lesson. As his mother, it makes me want to cry to think about how far my son has come.

Please be aware that when my son enters your classroom on the first day of school, he works so hard on a daily basis to do his best. Do not let it shock you if he experiences a day where he struggles with transition, or if he invades one of his peer’s personal space. He will need you to be his champion during these times. He will need you to tell him everything is going to be OK. He needs to be aware that you will support him when he experiences a difficult moment. He does so much better when he feels supported rather than feeling as if he is being ridiculed.

My son’s personal best may look different than his peer’s personal best. It will be important for you to realize that my son may need some additional supports to be successful, but that it’s still important for him to be held to a high standard. That high standard may look a bit differently than one of his counterparts. This is dependent upon the type of tasks that are asked of him. If you seem him trying to avoid a task, this is most likely occurring because the activity you are asking him to complete is difficult. This doesn’t mean he can’t complete the activity, but it may mean that he didn’t quite understand your instructions, or he may need a visual, or he may just need some additional waiting time so he can process the assignment.

I am completely confident that you will do everything in your power to support my son. I know how hard it is to be a teacher. You see, I am also a teacher. I know you may have limited support and resources. I know you work long days and are often uncompensated for your time. My purpose in writing this letter is really for you to have a better glimpse of who my son is. I am hoping you will be his advocate and champion during this school year. I will do everything in my power to support you. I am looking forward to building a strong partnership with you this school year.

Best Regards,
A Loving Mom

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