Stimtastic Creates Jewelry for Adults and Teens With Autism Spectrum Disorder


Most products for people on the autism spectrum are geared towards children or their parents, so Cynthia Kim created something adults on the spectrum could enjoy. Enter Stimtastic, a jewelry and toy company that promotes “stimming” or self-stimulatory behaviors like arm flapping, rocking, humming and other repetitive movements common among people on the spectrum.

“My goal for Stimtastic and for the products we sell is to help adults and teens who stim feel not just comfortable but celebrated,” Kim, who was diagnosed with autism when she was 42, told The Daily Dot. “For an adult who has spent years or decades having to suppress their stims in certain settings, knowing that they can now walk into a meeting or classroom wearing an item that will allow them to quietly stim can be empowering.”

All of the toys and jewelry sold on the site are made for and tested by people with autism. The jewelry is affordable, with many pieces costing under $10. All pieces are designed to allow either fidgeting or chewing, and are designed for any gender who wants to wear them.

Stimtastic’s line of toys includes crocheted stress balls, chewable pencil toppers, puzzles and an iPhone case that mimics bubble wrap. For those concerned about sensory sensitivities, all of Stimtastic’s chewy products are made from a food-grade silicone, which is tasteless and odorless.

Kim wants Stimtastic to become a community where people with autism can feel comfortable being themselves. On the Stimtastic website, Kim invites visitors to contribute to the blog, submit a stimming video, comment on the Stimtastic Facebook page, and share ideas about making Stimtastic better. In addition to fostering a community, Stimtastic donates 10 percent of all proceeds back to the greater autism community. Stimtastic’s largest donation has provided weighted blankets for those who cannot afford them.

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