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4 Strategies That Help Me Deal With Self-Harm Urges


I’ve browsed and browsed and browsed the internet, and I haven’t seen as much information as I think there needs to be about what to do when you want to self-harm. I’ve been there. I know how desperate you may feel, how hard it may be to resist the urge. I know what it’s like. I also know some things that may help — at least, these help me.

1. Tell yourself out loud you don’t need it. 

You are not a bad person. You are fantastic, actually. You don’t need to or deserve to self-injure.

2. Try holding a cold ice cube against your skin.

Sometimes, it’s a matter of craving a specific sensation — and sometimes that craving can be satisfied by simply holding an ice-cube to your skin. It gives a sharp, stinging sensation similar to when you self-injure, yet it doesn’t actually harm you.

3. Talk to a friend or family member about absolutely nothing important.

Spending time with the people you care about keeps you from ruminating (thinking a lot about something negative). It also gives you something positive to think about. Talk about your favorite movies, TV shows, songs, etc.

4. Post affirmations in your room.

By surrounding yourself with positive thoughts, you will begin to think positively as well. This helps you make your way out of the pain and into a happier feeling. Posting things such as “I can do this!” and “I am a great _____!” can really do well to boost your self-esteem and get you out of that negative mindset.

Most importantly, remember you are amazing! You don’t deserve the pain you have and the pain you put yourself through. You deserve a happy, healthy life surrounded by happy, healthy thoughts and happy, healthy people. You deserve joy, happiness and love. So keep on being you. Be safe. Be healthy. Love you all!

— Rose

Editor’s note: This post is based on one person’s experience and shouldn’t be taken as medical advice. 

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.
If you need support right now, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.


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