Learning to Say No Is the Best Gift I Could Give Myself


People don’t understand my limits when I feel too overwhelmed at the end of a long work week to go out on a Friday. They take things personally when I decline their invitations.

I used to get caught up in upsetting them. One day, like a light bulb going on, I realized I was not responsible for their feelings.

Taking on too many things is not good for my health. Social activities, although enjoyable, are tiresome to me, especially if they take place in a busy environment.

I may choose to stay in, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t want to go out.

I’ve learned that limiting activities that drain my brain, especially during and around busy work weeks, is something I have to do. If I don’t conserve my energy at home, I won’t have the energy to do my job.

My job can be stressful but it’s actually a fun job, and I enjoy it.

I always want to be fresh and ready to do my best at work. That means taking care of myself — mentally and physically, eating healthy, and getting plenty of rest. I need to be sharp in order to work.

I have to say “no” to people. Some people get tired of hearing “no” over and over. I’ve lost friends over this. It sucks to lose friends, but my health has to come first.

I think “no” is a wonderfully empowering word. Learning to say “no” has set me free.

No — I won’t do it anymore, not if it’s not good for me.

This is me taking care of my mental health.

Follow this journey on Anonymously Autistic.

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