What I Learned From First Tying My Shoes at 18


“I did it!” I eagerly message my friends and family. I did what most people do every single day for the first time at the not-so-young age of 18. I tied my shoes. You see, as a person with cerebral palsy, it’s not always the big things that offer the largest challenges to me; sometimes the small things in life can be my biggest obstacles.

My name is Brad, and I have left hemipeligic cerebral palsy. Among the circle around me it’s often said my condition is “hardly noticeable,” which, you know, they kind of have a point. I can stand on my two legs, I can walk, I can run (even though I’d prefer not to), I can speak my mind well (even though my mother would prefer I didn’t). I guess it makes sense my condition isn’t noticeable at first or even second glance. However I struggle with the small things. The things most do in seconds on a day-to-day basis may take me minutes on the same day-to-day basis. Things like tying my shoes seemed impossible until at the age of 18 when I found my own adaptive way of doing it.

I adapt in almost all of these tasks my average day may face me with; most of it comes with the use of my left arm instead of using my hand to grasp objects. Sometimes I even slide down the stairs on my butt if the railing is on the left side of the staircase. I try to make sure everything is on my right side of my body when possible; however, that being said, it’s important not to ignore that side of my body. I’ve fallen in love with my way of doing things, and it’s still important to use the left side of my body to get in the exercise I need to keep my muscles stretched (and my mom, who’s an occupational therapist, happy with me.)

No matter your condition or situation, I believe it is vital to fall in love with your way of doing things. Every small victory is still just that: a victory. No matter how big or small, you’re continuing to move forward. I tied my shoes, and I’m beyond proud of myself. What’s next for you?

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Thinkstock photo by Oleg Malyshev

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