Livi Rae Lingerie Refuses to Take Down Ads Featuring Disabled and Plus-Sized Models


Livi Rae Lingerie, a lingerie company in Kennesaw, Georgia, is fighting back after it was told to remove its storefront ads which feature a model with a disability as well as plus-sized models. The company, which is know for its diversity, sells products for a variety of different body types including those who have had mastectomies as well as those with prosthetics and other disabilities.

The store’s current ad features Stacey Shortley, a model with multiple sclerosis who uses a wheelchair; Tisa Edge, an African-American model and plus-size models Marie Layne and Bubble Bordeaux.

On Monday, the company shared a post to its Facebook page stating, “Our landlord’s told us to take down our latest campaign off of our windows because they deemed it ‘in bad taste.’ There’s not a thing wrong with our windows and we’re fighting to keep them up!”

To help get the word out, Livi Rae Lingerie invited followers to show their support using the hashtag #NoShameLivirae. “We’ve never had to clear an ad with the management property in the past. We were told that the ad is in ‘poor taste,’ but no one has explained what that means,” co-owner Cynthia Decker told Yahoo Style

 

 

 

 

“We absolutely are not taking down our windows. We poured out our heart and souls along side these everyday women who bared their bodies to help women feel better about themselves,” the store’s other owner, Molly Hopkins told The Independent.

Customers and fans shared the company’s sentiment, sharing its hashtag on social media.

 

 

 

Thanks to an “overwhelming response from customers and fans,” Livi Rae Lingerie announced its management company is letting it keep its ad campaign.

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