My Son's Awesome Response About the Autistic Power Ranger


Hot on the heels of the recent reveal that “Sesame Street” has their first autistic Muppet, there is a re-boot of the “Power Rangers Movie.” And you’ve guessed it, one of the Power Rangers is autistic.

As a parent of kids with autism, one who is a 9-year-old Power Rangers fan — I literally squealed with excitement when I heard the news.

The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers are back! A group of ordinary school kids find themselves instilled with alien powers they must master as a team to save the world. Among one of those “ordinary kids” is one with autism.  This didn’t really strike home until I told my son, Anthony, about it.

“Anthony, you know the ‘Power Rangers’ movie that’s coming out soon?”

“Ohhhh yes.”

“Well, this is really exciting — the Blue Ranger has autism, like you. He will be a bit like you.”

“Oh mom, that will just make him even more like me.”

Then I listened as my amazing son told me the ways in which he is already like a Power Ranger.

1. He is brave.

Anthony struggles with several challenges. He is brave to get over his fears and worries every day.

2. He is strong.

Take a boy with autism and ADHD who spends all day jumping about and you get someone fit. He’s no longer losing weight due to his medication, so he is lean and strong — not unlike the Power Rangers.

3. He wants to help and protect people.

OK, he was beginning to pull at my heartstrings, but it’s true. Anthony tries to protect everyone. He seems desperate to keep everyone safe. The best way he tries to do this is by helping others follow the rules and his general empathy far exceeds what you may think you’d find in a 9-year-old boy with autism. He even wanted to protect the kids who bullied him at school so they wouldn’t get into trouble.

4. He moves fast.

Anthony loves speed. Roller coasters, driving on motor ways, he’s even into motor sports himself. It’s as if he should have been born on a planet with a faster spin. When he’s rushing around the house, he’s almost a blur.

5. He’s good at fighting.

OK, that sounds a bit of a disaster but it’s not, really. Both Anthony and his brother David are on the autistic spectrum and they are both sensory seekers. It’s a bit like having an itch that you need to scratch I guess. But it’s not an itch, it’s a need for pressure or loud noises or something else that stimulates their senses. This means they seek out touch and contact — hugs, rolling and rough and tumble play are in abundance in our house.

And my absolute favorite which I’m paraphrasing for comprehension:

6. “I’m not the same as everyone else and it can be difficult sometimes, but I’m still best when I’m myself.”

The Power Rangers are special and they are different from the other kids in school. This means they have to take on evil aliens and protect the world. But being who they are makes them stronger in their battles and leads them to victory. And at the end of the day, even though they are different, they’re also just kids who go to school.

Yes Anthony, you are awesome.

Needless to say, my eldest boy is super excited the “Power Rangers Movie” has just come out. Well done to those involved in the making of the movie, who made it even more relatable for our lad. His only suggestion was if he’d chosen a Ranger to be autistic it would be the red one, but only because red is his favorite color.

Follow this journey at Rainbows are too Beautiful

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Photo source: Youtube video

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