When You Struggle With Knowing if You Are 'Fully Recovered' Yet


When I have a cold, it’s obvious I’m sick. And when it goes away, it’s obvious it’s gone.

When I have depression, it’s not obvious to anyone – even me sometimes. And when it goes away, how am I going to know? Before I fell apart, was I depressed then? In hindsight, probably. I just didn’t recognize it.

It was clear as a summer’s day when my depression hit rock bottom. I was fatigued, despondent, without hope, alienated, withdrawn, fragile, anxious, starving myself, self-harming and lacking self-care. I am not in that place any more, something for which I am eternally grateful.

But it is a long road from rock bottom to “fully recovered.” I don’t know what fully recovered looks like and I actually have no idea how far I’ve travelled down the road.

Some days I still feel fatigue – not as much as I used to, but still more than I should. I have occasional days of feeling despondent and hopeless, but it is no longer relentless and perpetual.

I don’t feel alienated and withdrawn. I reached out and continue to do so. I am writing, talking and sharing as much as I can. Even when I can’t bear to do it. 

I still feel incredibly fragile and anxious. The slightest error or conflict and I’m panicking, teary and wanting to run away, hide under a rock and never emerge. I want to feel more resilient and emotionally stronger.

So at what point can I say I’m no longer depressed? When am I “recovered” from depression? Is it when I stop medication and feel no different? Is it when I no longer experience anxiety? When I feel stronger? If I overcome my eating disorder? How do I tell?

Perpetual happiness is as unnatural as perpetual sadness. Relentless energy is as unnatural as relentless fatigue. Yet somewhere there is a middle ground of healthy and balanced. And it is that midway point I would like to find.

Recovery – as everyone keeps mentioning – is not linear. It’s a shame. But it’s true.

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If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text “START” to 741-741.

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