What I Wish the Doctors Who Said I Would 'Never' Could See


I didn’t know this until a few years ago, but when I was 3 months old, doctors told my parents to prepare for what my life would be like. I had been diagnosed with several congenital abnormalities including micropthalmia with blindness in one eye. Doctors stated that I would never develop intellectually beyond where I was. I would never walk or talk or go to school or drive or have a job. Never. That is such a finite word, never.

Well, I certainly proved those doctors wrong. With prayers and love I blossomed. I was able to walk and talk. I not only went to school, but I have several degrees including a graduate level education. I have been recognized for my intellect and creativity. I learned to drive and am an independent adult. I have never let myself be held back by anyone.

I believe obstacles are only roadblocks in life if you let them be. You can choose to overcome them. That’s my attitude. I wish I could find those doctors who over 30 years ago told my parents “never” because well, I certainly proved them wrong.

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

Image via Thinkstock.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Related to Blindness

Stack of books on a table.

Why We Must Save Bookshare for People With Disabilities

Author’s note: Bookshare, a service that provides large print and Braille digital books for people with print disabilities worldwide, is currently in danger of losing federal funding. As a student with low vision, I have been using Bookshare since 2011 and it has dramatically changed the way I read. Below, I have written a sample [...]

Josh Sundquist's First Novel Explores Blindness, Identity, 'Love and First Sight'

The following is an excerpt from Josh Sundquist’s debut novel, “Love and First Sight.” Vice Principal Larry Johnston extends his hand. To clarify: I don’t see this. I hear the swish of his shirtsleeve. “Nice to meet you, William.” The fabric sound plays again—the hand retracting. “I’m sorry, I guess you can’t do that now, [...]
Carla standing outdoors near the bus.

How Living With Blindness Can Open Windows of Perception

Many people in society seem to believe blindness is a fate worse than death. As a recently blinded woman, it wasn’t until I lost my sight that I realized blindness is just a different way of perceiving the world around me — certainly not a death sentence. My “dark” circumstances have caused me to open [...]
Members of Emmanuella's advocacy group.

Why I Became a Disability Advocate in Nigeria

One good thing that has happened in my life is developing the ability to understand my place in society and take a stand, even if I stand alone. I have developed the courage to understand that disability does not only affect persons who live with one, it also affects their relatives by blood or by [...]