The Difficulty of Working in Places That Don’t Consider Autistic Employees’ Needs


One of the many aspects of me being on the autism spectrum is often a difficulty in holding down long-term employment. Some employers are biased in favor of those who are not on the spectrum and have a general lack of understanding of autistic individuals in the workplace.

Some employers like people who fit within the corporate box, often just like themselves. Have you ever tried to squeeze yourself into someone else’s box? They are restrictive, uncomfortable and generally fit someone else better than you. This is what it feels like working in a place that does not take into account an autistic person’s needs.

 

Maybe they think they do and then treat you like the rest of the staff, forgetting; not caring the badge on their corporate material and the shop door claims their positive attitude to disabled people. It would be nice to see compulsory training on how to treat and speak to autistic employees; maybe employ a few autistics and let them do the job. That would probably work far better.

It would be nice to have a complete CV/resume done some time. I did put one together once for the Disability Employment Advisor at the local job center. I had so many past employers that it surprised the person at the job center.

I do not claim to be an expert on employment law. It would probably be safer to say I do not know very much at all. However, I can claim to be something of an expert on employment, especially from the perspective of an Aspergian. (I like that word.) It would be nice to point out now that finally after many years of not knowing, I finally received my official diagnosis of Asperger’s and possible ADHD. Having official recognition of this does not mean I now have a job, but I have had a couple of employers offer me a job dependent on background checks. Waiting is tiresome, but at least things are going somewhere now.

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

Thinkstock image by monkeybusinessimages

TOPICS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Related to Autism Spectrum Disorder

This burrito looks very tasty with beef, peppers and melted cheese. And now people with screen readers, you can join in being hungry.

How My Life With Asperger's Is Like an Overstuffed Burrito

I generally don’t get symbolism; I’m just wired that way. Tell me something and I’ll think you actually meant what you said. Art and literature usually don’t cause any emotional stirring within me, regardless of how much I want them to. But music… music can move me. On rare occasions I’m even temporarily gifted the [...]

Why I Won't Stop Advocating for My Child on the Autism Spectrum

Yes, I am a constant advocate (nudge, champion, upholder, supporter, backer, promoter, proponent, exponent, spokeswoman, spokesperson, campaigner, fighter, crusader). if(typeof(jQuery)=="function"){(function($){$.fn.fitVids=function(){}})(jQuery)}; jwplayer('jwplayer_YIBqLkIm_zURkbSIg_div').setup( {"playlist":"https:\/\/content.jwplatform.com\/feeds\/YIBqLkIm.json","ph":2} ); I won’t stop: Until people grasp that everyone is “different.” Until everyone includes him. Until people see my son first — autism second. Until everyone is kind to my son. Until people realize [...]

The Obstacles to Learning That Bullying Imposes On Children With Disabilities

When I was growing up, every month was autism awareness month in my home, but definitely not in the general community. My younger brother was diagnosed with autism when I was about 5 years old. I don’t remember a time when I wasn’t aware he had a disability and an ever present sense that my [...]

When We Told Our Son He Is On the Autism Spectrum

Our son was 7 years old when he got the autism spectrum diagnosis. He had already been scheduled to move from the special education class to the “Autistic Support” class because, thankfully, school districts don’t need a medical diagnosis to take action. We had been through the ringer — no, Sean had been through the wringer [...]