Couple standing on rock at sunset.

Back on Christmas of 2016, I was very down. I wanted fame and fortune more than anything. I just had a relationship end a month before; a girl I really liked moved away. My first attempt to publish a book failed. All of that got me down and I thought I’d be a loser in my life. So to hopefully get my spirits up, I wrote a letter to myself pretending that me at age 40 could see me living my life at 25. This is what my future self wrote to me.

Dear Louis,

I know you’re down right now. I know you want to be famous. I know you wish you could be that girl’s boyfriend. I know she’s moving and you’re going to miss her. I know you always feel your siblings have it better than you. I know you’re frustrated with your book and I know for sure you want everyone to like you. But I have a few things to tell you before you hit the age of 40. When you hit 40, you’re going to look back at all this and laugh out loud. You’re going to remember that the girl never went out of her way for you. You’re going to realize you were better off without her. I know it doesn’t seem that way right now but believe me, you will.

You’re also going to realize you want to be famous for all the wrong reasons — that girl being one of them. That’s not the way you should want to live your life. There are plenty of women out there who are going to love you and want to date you. You’re so young, you’re going to have plenty of shots to date attractive women. Enjoy life; you’ll be OK in the long run even though it doesn’t seem like it. You’re going to marry a beautiful young woman who will be so lucky to have you, and you’re going to look back and wonder why you ever worried this much.

You’re going to look back at the things you did because you thought your career was in jeopardy over a few failures. I promise you by the time you’re 40, you’re going to have the career you want. You’ve got time. You have a best buddy, you still have your family who love you, you’ve got other friends who admire you so much and she even told her friends about you.

I want you to do something, and you’re going to be glad you did before you hit 40. I want you to stop putting so much pressure on yourself. You are an inspiration to this world, and you’ve done so many things most people can only dream of. There are people who look up to you, even if you don’t see it. You don’t need to be famous for people to like you. You shouldn’t want to be famous for people to like you. You just need to be yourself and do the best you can. Shania Twain wouldn’t want you to put pressure on yourself, so you shouldn’t either.

You need to start being more proud of the things you did, because you did so much at such a young age. If you never think you’re good enough, you’re going to be miserable for the rest of your life and life is too short. Don’t compare yourself to others. Don’t focus on tomorrow as much as today. You are somebody and you need to start seeing it that way. One more thing, by the time you’re 40, you will have a good job, a good place to live and be married to a woman who will be so lucky to have you. Until then, enjoy life, Louis. I promise you’ll be OK.

— Louis Scarantino at 40

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Thinkstock photo by David DeLossy. 

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The quickest growing population in the United States has the lowest autism diagnosis rates, according to several studies, and the big question on everyone’s mind is: Why?

Well, according to pediatricians across the country, the primary reason for low diagnosis rates in Hispanics is due to the confusion of the questions on the screening questionnaire.

The solution presented to this is a verbal Q and A between the doctors and the parents of these children. Yippie for future kids on the spectrum!

But Wait, What Exactly Does that Mean?

It means the answer to why Hispanics don’t have higher diagnosis numbers is because of language barriers and semantics. As great as this new research is, it does open the door for a whole mess of questions, especially for teens and adults on the spectrum.

Right now the statistic is 1 in 68 kids has autism, up from 1 in 100. That doesn’t mean there is an epidemic, though. We’re just getting better at recognizing it. Low Latino diagnosis isn’t limited to the United States though. Currently, diagnosis numbers range about 1 in 115 children in Mexico. Compared to 1 in 68, this is quite a gap.

Undiagnosed kids still grow up to be autistic adults, and a lot of them get married and have babies. In fact, many adults learn about their own autism when they’re raising their children and their children are diagnosed.

The autistic adult world statistics are distressing, with 1 in 63 newly diagnosed adults having suicidal thoughts. Finding out about autism as an adult makes for a complicated life story, filled with revelations about one’s own childhood experiences and misunderstandings.

So what about the undiagnosed autistic Hispanic teens and adults who are past the age for a verbal screening for autism? If there are verbal misunderstandings in autistic patients and cultural barriers in regards to language and semantics preventing a diagnosis of autism, then what happens when autistic Hispanics who don’t know they have autism… go to the doctor?

How does it feel to be undiagnosed?

As a teen and young adult, I lost many friendships because my responses were taken the wrong way or I said something too foolish for them to think it wasn’t on purpose. I got better at catching offense on my feet, but I hated living with the anxiety of knowing I might say something offensive at any given moment, and having to be socially prepared for my own “stupidity”. I wanted so desperately for people to think I was a nice person, but I was just known as bitchy and bossy, and you could only see my “care” if you knew what it looked like. I will say this about myself though: I hate being misunderstood. Even if it took a fight for you to understand me, I made people understand me, because I wasn’t coming from a bad place and to me, people had to know that.

I was a Hispanic child with no diagnosis and a whole mess of weird issues. I knew I was different from the kids at school, because I was always lost on social situations. But I was book smart, and I would read six fiction books or so a week. I learned so many different words for so many different feelings I always had, but I didn’t understand social nuance in a way that allowed me to communicate anything unless I was upset or frustrated. Once I got mad enough, the words would flow, and I didn’t have the emotional maturity to tailor myself or sometimes even feel apologetic. Once I got out how I felt, the anxiety of trying to get all my words together went away and I felt ten times better. Most of the time, I wasn’t even mad anymore. I didn’t know anything about mental health disorders.

How Do Hispanic People on the Spectrum Fall Through the Cracks?

My parents never took me to a psychologist. I was too much like other family members, so I was given coping mechanisms, not medicine. I appreciated this so much, because it made me stronger, but I can’t help but wonder what would’ve happened to me if I got my diagnosis sooner instead of later. Would I have realized my talents sooner in life, accepted myself sooner, loved myself sooner, instead of wasting so much time trying to fit into a world that wasn’t made for me?

My parents didn’t take me to a psychiatrist because life is hard and they were divorced. They both just corrected my terrible social skills as I messed up. And although they handled that very differently, they loved me for who I was.

Being Undiagnosed as an Adult and Going to the Doctor

I went through a summer before I was 20 where I felt nauseous every time I ate and a lot of times I would threw up. I went to the doctor, and tried to explain my symptoms to him. He said I had irritable bowel syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome is a disorder that affects the large intestine, with symptoms including diarrhea, constipation, cramping, bloating and gas. There is no known cause. I was confused as to why he thought my problem had to do with my large intestine when my primary reason for visit was vomiting. From my stomach. I did my homework and found out that a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome is basically a doctor hack for giving up on why your belly aches, because it is actually an imbalance of gut neurotransmitters. Eventually a nurse practitioner diagnosed me with GERD and a hyperacidic stomach.

Another time, when I was around 24, I went to the doctor because I was having trouble eating. Even the thought was making me nauseous and a few times I threw up. When he asked me what I ate that day, I answered, “A bag of chips.” For some reason, he thought that meant I was anorexic instead of the host of other things it could’ve been. In talking with a nutritionist, it was uncovered that I was experiencing quite a bit of stress that was exacerbating my previous GERD diagnosis, and I needed to eat smaller and more often. Alexithymia is the worst.

Did I mention that people on the spectrum often have gastrointestinal disorders?

What Can Physicians and Latino Patients Do to Help Each Other?

My advice to physicians? Talk to your patients and read. Doctors often rush to treat the symptoms and not figure out the cause. Observe your patient’s demeanor, review their medical history, and pull out your textbooks. There are too many specialists in the field and the generalists don’t know enough. Do your research about cultural preferences.

My advice to patients? Speak up. It doesn’t matter if you’re autistic or not. Everyone is a patient at some point or another, and no one knows your body like you do. If you’re feeling pain or you notice new or weird patterns with your body, it’s up to you to tell your doctor. People die unnecessarily every day because this kind of information is not exchanged. Tell your doctor about any weird symptoms you might have during your annual physicals.

Undiagnosed autistic Hispanic patients need to be treated with respect and listened to, just like neurotypical patients. The Latino population needs doctors who will show us they are on our side. Verbal questionnaires are a great place to start.

America as a society is just barely understanding how mental health and medical health are actually hand-in-hand. People are starting to figure out there is no such thing as normal and every day research is getting closer and closer to better therapies for people with autism.

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Thinkstock photo by Jupiter Images.


An old People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) campaign is making its way around the internet again, almost 10 years after it was originally launched. In 2008, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) fought — and won — to have a PETA billboard taken down that linked drinking milk caused autism. In addition to the billboard, the campaign, titled “Got Autism,” also featured an article on PETA’s website, which still exists to this day.

According to PETA, “Anyone who wants to alleviate the effects of autism should try giving cow’s milk the boot and switch to healthy vegan alternatives instead.” The organization’s claims were based on two incredibly small studies, that looked at 20 and 36 children respectively. Since then, multiple studies have found the evidence linking casein-free (the protein found in milk) and gluten-free diets as a “treatment” for autism to be “limited and weak.”

The campaign appears to be brought back to people’s attention by Jack Monroe, an autistic British food writer who tweeted on Thursday asking the controversial organization to remove Monroe’s recipes from its site.

Less than a day following their tweets, PETA removed Monroe’s recipes from its site but has not taken down the original article or issued any comments regarding its campaign. Since then, others have replied on Twitter criticizing PETA and asking them to remove the campaign from its website.

The campaign’s resurfacing marks the third time people have protested the nearly decade-old campaign. The campaign made headlines again in 2014, but was not removed despite media attention.

Update: A spokesperson for PETA told The Mighty: 

This is an old campaign that is still on our website because we have heard from people who have said it contains helpful information. Many families have found that a dairy-free diet can help children with autism, and since the consumption of dairy products has been linked to asthma, constipation, recurrent ear infections, iron deficiency, anemia, and even cancer, dumping dairy is a healthy choice that everyone can make.

The Mighty reached out to Jack Monroe and has yet to hear back. 


My name is Hannah. One year and two days ago I was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder — Asperger’s syndrome profile.

I had been trying to get a diagnosis since I was 17 years old. I was misdiagnosed with depression, anxiety (I do have anxious feelings but these are as a direct result of how I perceive the world due to my autism) and an eating disorder.

I have lost count of how many times that people have said things to me like “but you don’t look autistic,” “but you have a job,” “but you seem so normal.” People focus too much on stereotypes and don’t realize people with autism are as diverse as everyone else.

Since I received my diagnosis, I have been sharing my experiences on every social media platform possible. I want to stop people having the same problems I did. It is too common for people on the spectrum, particularly women and girls, to get misdiagnosed.

I used Autism Awareness Week to share my story on a local radio station and they shared an article about me on their website. This was great, but it is not enough.

Just because Autism Awareness Week is over, it doesn’t mean people with autism disappear. We constantly need to be aware and there is something much more important than awareness — acceptance.

A lot of people with autism use a technique called “masking” to hide their autistic traits and appear to be neurotypical. Our condition is not visible, yet we often still have the urge to hide it and pretend to be someone else.

I want people with autism to be free to be themselves. To encourage people with autism to embrace themselves rather than mask themselves, I started a new Instagram account, Aspie Aesthetic, to share my thoughts and feelings relating to autism in the hope it will open up a dialogue between me and other people with autism to normalize our experiences. I also hope neurotypical people will read my posts and educate themselves about autism so they understand us better.

I know I am only one girl and it is a big task, but I want to change the way the world sees us so the world is a nicer place for people with autism in the future.

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Thinkstock image by DM Baker.


This couple opened a karate studio to teach people of all abilities.

Read the full transcript:

This Martial Arts Program Is Karate Chopping Stereotypes

Kicking The Spectrum teaches people of all abilities Japanese Shotokan Karate.

Located in NYC, the adaptive martial arts program was established by David and Stephanie Rosenberg in 2010.

The program started as karate demonstrations for kids with disabilities at St. Mary’s Hospital.

After seeing how interested the kids were, David began teaching students one-on-one.

Stephanie, a Behavior Analyst, takes David’s curriculum and tailors it to each student’s needs.

Group classes can be as small as 2 to 5 students, allowing everyone individualized attention.

There are also classes that disabled and neurotypical kids can attend together.

“It is often that as a society, individuals are viewed solely on their external limitations.” -David Rosenberg

“However it is often forgotten that apart from their disabilities, these youth have the same general interests, energy levels and social needs as their peers.”

To learn more, visit kickingthespectrum.com.


As someone on the spectrum myself, I am a major autism advocate. I love to spread awareness and understanding. That being said, I had a very eye-opening conversation with a good friend one day. She mentioned something that made me realize one of the major issues in the autistic/autism community.

To me, it that there are many “neurotypical” people who are extremely open and willing to try to understand things from the point of view of someone on the autism spectrum. They are willing to ask questions and see things differently. Granted there are a few who are lost and confused and grasping what ASD means for their loved one. But most are trying to understand.

But it seems that when many people (not all, but many) on the autism spectrum are asked to do the same in return, there is a ton of resistance.

Don’t get me wrong. I have been this way myself in the past. I was definitely one of those people on the spectrum who didn’t even want to see things from the point of view of a “neurotypical.” To me, that wasn’t the issue. The issue was that no one understood me. I needed to teach them what it’s like to be on the spectrum.

But I believe this is a two-way street. It’s time to take responsibility and do my part to work with the rest of society. Just because I’m a little different, that doesn’t mean it’s their job to cater to me.

Maybe this means I need to figure out a way to be more patient and listen to what they are trying to say, even if I think I understand… maybe I’m misinterpreting things. Or perhaps it means I need to step a little bit outside of my comfort zone sometimes, like wearing a nicer outfit at a special occasion when I’m so used to my everyday clothes. I might need to be a bit flexible, and find ways to manage my anxiety when there is an unpredictable change in routine.

Yes, society should be understanding and a bit accommodating. And I see that “neurotypical” people are trying. Sometimes they struggle a bit. I’d struggle on my end, too. But if I’m a part of that society, I need to do the same for them. I need to try to be understanding of what they would like from me.

It’s only fair.

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Thinkstock photo by Garrett Aitken.

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