Accept My Son With a Disability for Who He Is


I don’t understand the stories in social media.

I don’t understand the comments that take the general trend of :

“It’s such a shame.”
“I feel so sorry for him.”
“It’s such a shame he can’t have age appropriate toys.”
“It’s such a shame he can’t play like other children.”
“It’s such a shame he can’t do ______.”

Why is it such a shame ?

Why is it a problem to some people?

Why do people feel sorry for him?

You see, I view my son, Luke, so differently.

Luke is a person. Luke has a life, a soul, a heart and a mind.

Who cares if he’s wired differently, works differently, thinks differently, sees differently, hears differently and I dare say a whole lot more things differently?

All these things make Luke an amazing person who completely fascinates me.

Recently I was asked by Luke’s speech and language therapist how concerned I am about Luke on a scale of one to five, this was such an easy answer, which also made her smile: “Zero. Luke is who Luke is, and Luke has the best and most amazing support to allow him to reach Luke’s own full potential”

I think the best and most amazing thing about Luke’s journey is acceptance. If you accept and embrace differences it’s the most incredible journey.

If you can’t accept the differences about having a child with disabilities, then find someone who can help you.

Acceptance isn’t easy.

Acceptance takes time, but when it truly happens, it is amazing.

Follow this journey at Luke’s Adventures With GDD.

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Getty image by amoklv


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