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The World I Dream of Living in as a Woman With a Disability


I dream of living in a world where the word “different” doesn’t carry the weighted connotations of “less than” or “outsider.”

I dream of living in a world where different is a celebration, not a condemnation.

I dream of living in a world where different perspectives, ideas, lifestyles, races, faces, bodies and abilities are seen and appreciated.

I dream of living in a world where difference is the great equalizer, and the creator of opportunities to learn and connect, to fill unique niches, to understand and think more broadly, and to make necessary changes to systems and policies so we can all live happier, healthier and more productive lives.

Mollie making the peace sign. She is sitting in her power wheelchair and wearing a bright turquoise dress.

I dream of a day when the word “disability” isn’t spoken as a way to describe someone who is unable, but is a declaration of someone who is able to live an adventurous, love-filled, busy and impactful life amidst some of the most challenging circumstances.

I dream of a day when people with mobility challenges are seen as strong and powerful people, not lacking abilities, but who live with additional abilities to think quickly and creatively to solve problems and create space where there is none.

I dream of a day when labels fall off and lose their meanings and when people are no longer catalogued — as disabled or otherwise.

I dream of a day when we are all one humanity, with no boundaries or limits.

Mollie smiling. She is sitting in her power wheelchair and wearing a bright turquoise dress.

I dream of a day when — whether you get around on your wheels, your heels, your hands, your crutches, or heck, you scoot around on your butt — you pick your place, you make your space and you fill it with confidence.

I dream of a day when I am not stared at as an oddity, as a puzzle to be solved, as questions to be answered.

I dream of a day when I am seen, really seen, as the whole, entire woman I am.

I dream of a day when my disability is not a glaring issue, but just a glimpse into who I am: a goofy, smiley, smart(ass), compassionate woman who works hard, who loves and laughs even harder — and who feels most confident in a dress, some jewelry and a red lip.

Image Credits: Mollie Miller