The Sweet Reason Adam Levine and Maroon 5 Got Down on the Floor With This Boy

31k
31k

Christopher Warner, a 10-year-old Maroon 5 super fan with Down syndrome from Howard County, Maryland, just had his dreams come true.

Last week Christopher’s teachers helped him make a YouTube video about his love of the band in the hopes of getting him the chance to meet them. Soon, local radio station Hot 99.5 got involved and landed Christopher the chance of a lifetime — to attend a Maroon 5 concert and meet the band afterwards, My Fox DC reported.

However, after the concert when it finally came time to meet his idol, frontman Adam Levine, Christopher become so excited and overwhelmed that he had a little panic attack. To help him calm down and feel more relaxed, Levine suggested they all lie down.

Christopher, his mother, an intern from the radio station and the entire band all got down together to take a breather, and the incredibly sweet moment was caught on camera.

Adam Levine and Maroon 5 band lying on the floor with Christopher

The band autographed some pictures Christopher had drawn of them in addition to giving him CDs, posters, drumsticks and shirts.

Watch the video below for the full story:

DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG
31k
31k

RELATED VIDEOS

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

The Moment My Son Showed Me His Sister Will Be OK, Even After I'm Gone

3k
3k

I’d consider myself to be a pretty easygoing, roll-with-the-punches kinda momma. But two things in particular just about do my head in: Potty training (for obvious reasons) and getting children out the door (especially in the winter). I’m always running late — I mean always — so the added nonsense of boots, coats, hats and mitts times two just about makes me wanna hibernate and call it a day.

Take this morning — my one day when both hooligans are at daycare and I get to actually work. Pip went up and down the stairs about 13 times, Noal refused to put his boots on the right feet, Pip didn’t want to wear mitts, and Noal kept distracting the whole process by singing to her, which she loved.

IMG_20150224_085857

And right before I was about to get all outta sorts, they took me down a notch, like they always do, and showed me really what matters…

“Look, Momma, I can even kiss Pippy through the stairs.”

They kept kissing, Pip laughing each and every time, and Noal beaming proudly because he made his girls happy.

IMG_20150224_085637

You’d think that would be enough of an emotional hug today, but oh no. Fate was not finished. Walking into daycare, Pip was a bit slower and having a hard time on the snow, so Noal kept pushing her along and holding her hand.

IMG_20150224_085349

And in that moment when I took this sweet, sweet pic, it was as if this was them, 50 years from now. It was as if this was a glimpse of my sweet boy taking care of his sister, when my husband and I are gone. It was as if fate once again was showing me they have each other and everything will be OK.

P.S. Noal is the King of Time-Outs in our household, but Pippy always has to go sit beside him to make sure he’s OK.

This post originally appeared on Happy Soul Project.

3k
3k
TOPICS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

The Best Advice I’ve Ever Received About Getting a Diagnosis

878
878

It’s been two years already since we welcomed my daughter, Ellie, into our lives with her little extra somethin’ somethin’. And in these two years, I’ve received some amazing advice:

“Be kind to yourself.” “Don’t project into the future, enjoy each day.” “Milestones, schmilestones.” “Don’t compare.” “Don’t limit her.” “Admit when you need a break.” “Follow your gut.” The last one has proven to be an important one. But the one that’s really stayed with me was given to me less than a month after Ellie was born. Let me explain how it all happened.

Somehow, the Down Syndrome Network of Oregon heard about Ellie’s birth diagnosis, and they wanted to give me a Basket of Hope. I had no idea what this meant, and I hesitantly agreed to meet a local mom. We chatted over email, and I found out she had a son named Jacob with Down syndrome; he was 13 at the time. They planned on coming over to meet Ellie.

Meeting Jacob would be the first time I’d actually talked to someone with Down syndrome. I was nervous, and I asked my mom to come over to meet them with me. In a fateful sort of way, this mother lived a couple doors down in our neighborhood just a few years earlier. And now they live only a couple of miles away — I love when this stuff happens!

She and Jacob and his older sister arrived and were so welcoming and sweet. Jacob was tall and lanky, considerate and well spoken. I’m ashamed to say it now, but upon meeting him I realized I had some serious misconceptions about what the diagnosis meant, and I had a lot to learn. He was so sweet with Ellie. He held her carefully and he brought tears to our eyes when he said quietly, “You’re like me.”

elliejacob

Jacob’s mom was laid back and easy to talk to. I felt like I’d known her my whole life. She asked me what we liked to do for fun, and I told her our favorite things were entertaining and going boating. This was when she said “So, you like to throw parties? Keep doing it. You like to go boating? Keep going boating.” It was as simple as that. It was a defining moment for me. It’s hard for me to explain, but I felt lighter, like a weight had lifted off my shoulders. I kept thinking our lives were forever changed when we found out about Ellie’s Down syndrome. This mom went on to explain how therapy is important but to not let it rule our life. Ellie being home with her brothers, going on the boat, spending time with family and friends doing regular things is just as important as therapy. 

Since meeting her that day, I think about her words often. I get caught up (a lot) in wondering if I’m doing the right things. The list of therapies available is as long as my arm, and the list of vitamins and supplements she could be taking is huge. I have to take a step back quite a bit to make sure I’m not spinning out of control with the research. We have a smart, happy little girl who is a complete riot, who loves partying, and she absolutely loves boating. Our life as we know it is pretty dang good, and I’m so glad I had this seasoned mom to remind me that things only would change for us if I let them.

Next weekend I get to deliver a Basket of Hope to a new local mom. I have to mention how grateful I am to the Down Syndrome Network of Oregon to give me this opportunity. Receiving that basket two years ago meant the world to me. I’m so giddy to be able to meet this mom and her beautiful new baby boy. We have been in touch over the last few months, and I feel like I know her already. Actually, there were two new babies born in the area on the same exact day, how awesome is that!? I just have to say it, welcome to the club new mamas!

elliedec2

This post originally appeared on our three little birds.

The Mighty is asking its readers the following: Describe the moment a stranger — or someone you don’t know very well — showed you or a loved one incredible love. No gesture is too small! If you’d like to participate, please send a blog post to [email protected] Please  include a photo for the piece, a photo of yourself and 1-2 sentence bio.

878
878
TOPICS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Meet Spain's First Male Model With Down Syndrome

1k
1k

I’m a fighter,” Raúl Rodríguez says in the video below. “I fight my limitations.”

Rodríguez is reportedly Spain’s first male model with Down syndrome, and he’s using the spotlight to break down some barriers.

This February, Silbon, a Spanish clothing company, launched a campaign called Commitment, or “compromiso” in Spanish, to send home the message that people with Down syndrome can lead normal lives.Rodríguez, 32, is its star. According to the campaign’s website, throughout the month, it donated a euro for each item sold in any of Silbon’s stores across the country to a Down syndrome association in Córdoba, Spain, called Down Córdoba.

Rodríguez, 32, is from Córdoba. Along with modeling, he’s also a competitive swimmer, according to El Comercio.

Down syndrome is not a sickness,” Rodríguez says in the video below. “I’m not sick. I’m an adult person, and I learn as any such person.”

Check out some of his photos below:

Watch this video to see Rodríguez in action during a photo shoot:

h/t Voxxi

1k
1k
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

When a Couple at the Restaurant Noticed Something About My Family I'd Almost Forgotten

3k
3k

When our little Amelia was born 18 months ago, the focus was on her survival. She was born with an extra 21st chromosome which, in her case, caused a severe heart defect. Amelia began having serious issues within a few weeks of birth: struggling to eat and even just breathe. She was in and out of the hospital many times that first year for illnesses, open-heart surgery and a surgery to place her g-tube.

As Amelia reached a year, with the most serious health issues behind us, we switched our focus to therapy to help her learn to eat, walk and speak.

When an older couple took an interest in Amelia at a restaurant, I wasn’t surprised. Since Amelia doesn’t eat, she spends mealtimes waving and smiling and playing. The couple came over to me afterward, and the gentleman said, “She is the most adorable little girl! Just when I thought she couldn’t get any more darling, she would!” His wife motioned to our other two children (5 and 3) and said how precious she thought all our kids were. Then she said something that stopped me in my tracks:

“You are one lucky mama.”

My eyes filled with tears. This couple had been observing our family for long enough to know that Amelia was being fed through a tube, long enough to see that she’s developmentally behind and has Down syndrome. But they’d also been watching long enough that they came to understand how truly blessed we are to have all three of these precious kiddos.

Amidst the illnesses and surgeries and therapies, in the middle of working on overcoming so many challenges, I hadn’t paused long enough to realize just how amazing my family really is. I’ve always known how much I love my children and that I wouldn’t trade them for the world. But to have someone else notice, to have someone look at us without feeling sorry for us – to go so far beyond that as to think we’re lucky —  that was a gift.

This kind stranger gave me a new perspective and a new mantra: I am, indeed, one incredibly blessed mama!

10517498_545202572250355_1768961892445846350_n

Follow this journey on Paper Fences.

The Mighty is asking its readers the following: Describe the moment a stranger — or someone you don’t know very well — showed you or a loved one incredible love. No gesture is too small! If you’d like to participate, please send a blog post to [email protected] Please  include a photo for the piece, a photo of yourself and 1-2 sentence bio.

3k
3k
TOPICS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Why We Started a College Fund for Our Newborn With Down Syndrome

2k
2k

I’ve hesitated on writing this post. I don’t want it to come across wrong. I want you to know that I don’t think I’m some sort of hero for not wanting a traditional push present. Because lady, if looking forward to getting that Kate Spade bag helps you get through 9 months of nausea, back pain and swollen feet, then by all means… treat yo self! What I asked for just happens to be what I want more than anything.

Before I delivered my first child, Violet, I knew exactly what I wanted for my push present. I wanted something that would remind me of not only her but also of what we went through trying to conceive her (read about it here). I wanted a cross. I’d never owned a cross necklace, and I thought it was the perfect reminder of God’s promise in our lives. I’ve worn this necklace a lot over the last few months of dealing with our son’s prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome. Even on the darkest days, the days I don’t feel like acknowledging God at all, it reminds me of how I believe He always makes good on His promises. 

So, what did I want this time? Jewelry, bags, clothes… none of it seemed to fit. After a long, teary conversation with my husband, Andy, I told him I wanted to take the money he would have spent on a more traditional present and start a college fund for our son, Anderson.

IMG_3670

You get a lot of advice when you go through something like this. One of my favorite bits of wisdom was from a teacher for children with special needs. She told me that her most successful students were not necessarily those with the less severe disability, but the children whose parents treated them no differently than their other siblings. Even though I know Anderson will have mental and physical delays, I will expect him to do his best, to try his best, to be his best self… just as I will expect the same from his sister.

IMG_1794

According to Think College, there are now more than 200 college programs for people with disabilities; so, why not Anderson? And if traditional school proves to not be his cup of tea, he can use the money we saved to continue his education in another way… but we will expect him to continue.

Of course this is scary to put out into the world. We don’t know what kind of delays Anderson will face. I get scared when I read articles about children with Down syndrome who are also diagnosed with autism or are nonverbal or struggle with other illnesses that are more common in people with Down syndrome. But no matter what he faces, I want him to know that we expect great things, that we believe in him.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 9.06.32 AM

Because here’s the thing: none of us know what any of our children will be capable of doing. I can’t see what the future holds for Violet any more than I can for Anderson. Yes, we know Anderson will have to work harder to do many of the things that most of us take for granted. But with his diagnosis we know that it will help him to excel at many things many of us don’t put enough value in. As one of my readers put it, he will most likely be intuitive and understand life from a higher plane. And we will continue to push him to excel, we will be there for him in his failures and celebrate with him in his achievements… just as we will be there for all of our children, extra chromosome or not.

IMG_3549

This post originally appeared on News Anchor to Homemaker.

2k
2k
TOPICS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Real People. Real Stories.

7,000
CONTRIBUTORS
150 Million
READERS

We face disability, disease and mental illness together.