A Letter to the NEA: 'On the Chronically Tarded and Medically Annoying'

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Recently, a speech by NEA President Lily Eskelsen Garcia on what teachers are expected to do each day flooded social media. While many shared the clip and applauded some of its excellent points, it didn’t take long for outrage to set in. When discussing the challenges inherent to differentiating classroom instruction, Garcia listed a series of learning disabilities that ended with the phrase “the chronically tarded and medically annoying.” That didn’t go over well with a lot of people, including me.

Setting aside my initial dismay at her choice of words, I was further disappointed by your response to the controversy. First, there was a delay. Then this video went viral. I personally saw it dozens of times in my Facebook and Twitter feeds. Had I been her, the moment I realized I’d thrown out the word “tarded,” I wouldn’t have waited to correct it. I would have immediately raced to my social media accounts and begged forgiveness for my verbal blunder.

She didn’t do that. A month following her speech, she tweeted to the effect of it being an error (“stepping on a word”) combined with a poorly conceived joke. (I’m guessing social media’s negative reaction to those tweets is why she deleted them shortly thereafter.) I confess that like other advocates for special needs, I’m having difficulty with her explanation.

That’s because I thought the rest of the speech was fantastic. She channeled her inner Winston Churchill in a way that was well-considered, thought-provoking and passionate. At first, I was cheering her on and enjoying that feeling of “Yes, she’s speaking for us!” Then came the tarded and annoying line, and my jaw dropped.

I have no idea whether or not she accidentally tripped over the word tardy or not. I could have bought that and probably would’ve with a prompt and dignified apology — were that the only problem with her sentence. But it wasn’t. It was followed by the phrase “medically annoying.” She explained that was a badly worded joke, triggering a real “What you talking about, Willis?” moment for me. As I said, the rest of her speech was excellent. And, see, stirring speeches don’t happen by accident. 

Churchill’s iconic rallying words weren’t extemporaneous and neither were hers. She obviously took some time with it. It was the kind of speech or essay a writer goes over and over, picking out the weeds, because you know it to be truth, and you want that truth conveyed. I find it difficult to believe she wouldn’t have questioned her joke. Since all of the other items in the series preceding it were a legitimate, non-humorous list of learning disabilities, it doesn’t even make sense to have the last two be jokes out of context. And the second one is a play of words on a phrase used to describe children who are hooked up to tracheostomy tubes and portable oxygen. How could that possibly seem like a good joke?

Next, she posted her video apology and elaborated on the same explanation. I’ve already stated why many of us are unsatisfied with it. However, I wasn’t lining up with those demanding her resignation. (Since I don’t purport to know where her heart was when she wrote that line, I’m not willing to sign a petition for her removal.) But her apology video is where things got worse. She laughed. She laughed about a controversy that — whether unkind or simply ill-conceived — had a lot of people believing she made fun of disabled children. While serving as the president of the nation’s largest teacher’s union, a powerful group of people one would hope would be sensitive to the needs of special education students. Special needs students who have families who love them dearly. Families who struggle more than most to prepare their children for an uncertain future. Mothers like me, up at 2 a.m. writing to you on a laptop in the dark, awake with an autistic child who suffers serious sleep issues. And, instead of apologizing in a respectful manner befitting the high emotions surrounding this controversy, she laughed. I hope it doesn’t come as a surprise that many of us did not share her amusement. There’s a not-so-subtle tone of censure in her laughter for any of us crazy enough to believe that was her intention. Perhaps it wasn’t her intention to say those things. But since she did, she fails to see the onus is on her to prove it — not giggle about it.

But even that’s not what’s most upsetting. Now, I’ll admit I’m not familiar with the inner workings of a large advocacy group, but I cannot imagine an organization as big as the NEA doesn’t have a team on this. Not solely dedicated perhaps, but I’m guessing you folks at the very least held a meeting on this drama. A meeting staffed with some highly educated people in the education profession. Since I doubt she prepared, produced and posted the video all alone, that means other people in the top seats of the NEA also thought the response to be an appropriate one. That’s what’s really bothering me.

You see, not only am I the parent of a child with special needs, I’m a teacher. I am also a fellow NEA member. I am one of you. And today I’m embarrassed to be associated with you.

No, I’m not calling for anyone’s resignation. There’s entirely too much of that sort of thing these days, and I’m sure you’re probably perfectly nice people who’ve made some errors in judgment. But I want you to know — because it matters — how your handling of this situation has disappointed our profession by further damaging already shaky perceptions special needs parents have about public education. Not by a simple mistake, but a series of them — highlighting your (and, by association, teachers’) insensitivity and lack of respect for the very people we seek to serve.  Children. Since you are teachers, I shouldn’t have to remind you of the higher standard to which we are held. Simply put: The “largest labor union committed to advancing the cause of public education” either inadvertently or intentionally insulted our most vulnerable students. And then voted to post a video laughing about it.

What you’re supposed to do when you hurt people is apologize, quickly and respectfully. You’re supposed to be forthright in your explanation. And if you are a major policy leader, you’re supposed to shout your dissatisfaction with your actions and commitment to improvement from the rooftop. That fact that all of you couldn’t see to do that doesn’t speak well for your advocacy for special education students and teachers in this country, who are presumably included under the umbrella of your mission statement.

I sincerely hope you hold another meeting. I hope that you don’t choose to chalk this up to a culture increasingly easy to offend. You are the National Education Association. I implore you to understand that more is and should be expected of your leadership. What we do and who we serve are too important for flippancy.

Teacher, teach thyself.

A version of this post originally appeared on Flappiness Is.

Lead photo source: YouTube video screenshot

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12 of the Best Twitter Responses to Kylie Jenner’s Wheelchair Photo Shoot

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People are not happy about the decision to pose Kylie Jenner in a wheelchair on the cover of Interview magazine’s December issue.

The able-bodied 18-year-old reality television star was photographed by Steven Klein sitting in an elaborate gold wheelchair. Interview released a statement but has yet to actually apologize for running the controversial images. The magazine told E! News:

At Interview, we are proud of our tradition of working with great artists and empowering them to realize their distinct and often bold visions. The Kylie Jenner cover by Steven Klein, which references the British artist Allen Jones, is a part of this tradition, placing Kylie in a variety of positions of power and control and exploring her image as an object of vast media scrutiny.

Throughout the Art Issue, we celebrate a variety of women who are both the creators and subjects of their artistic work, and the Kylie feature aims to unpack Kylie’s status as both engineer of her image and object of attention.

Meanwhile, Twitter has been a buzz with criticism, insight, wit and plain old exasperation.

Here are 12 of the best Twitter responses to the controversy:

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Related: My Problem With the Conversation Around Kylie Jenner in a Wheelchair

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A TV Producer Thought This Woman’s Birthmark Made Her ‘Too Ugly to Love’

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Lexxie Harford doesn’t usually cover her facial birthmark with makeup, but after being approached by two different dating shows in the UK, TLC’s “Too Ugly For Love?” and Channel 4’s “The Undateables,” she felt compelled to share a few selfies, along with a powerful message.

Harford, a graphic designer in England, added two sets of photos to her Imgur account on Nov. 16, which show her with and without makeup. Harford, 23, noted that she’s “used to people being very curious” about her birthmark, but that she’s “absolutely not self conscious about it at all.” She added, “I actually like it a lot.”

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Still, when a casting producer approached her, she decided to speak up. “I’m really comfortable and I don’t get offended easily,” Harford told ABC News. “He was very blasé. He tried to cover it and tried to make it prettier than it was. I had to say to him, ‘Look, I don’t really have a place on the show you’re scouting for.’ If they [people with birthmarks] accepted themselves, they really wouldn’t go on a show like that. I would try and get that person to see themselves differently.”

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“A lot of people are curious, or a lot of people with birthmarks cover them, so I like to raise awareness,” she added on her Imgur page.

Harford told BBC 5 Live’s Chris Warburton that she wants to “teach people what a birthmark actually is” so people who have them will feel “more comfortable to show them off.”

View post on imgur.com

View post on imgur.com

Harford answered questions from commenters on Imgur, and she’s pleased with the response she’s received.

“I know the first night, the individual photos had over 100,000 views,” she told ABC News. “It was really amazing in terms of the fact that I’ve always wanted to raise awareness; I just never figured out how. The next time they see someone with a birthmark they won’t forget. They’ll know what it is and they won’t get freaked out.”

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Suspects Identified in San Bernardino Mass Shooting

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The two deceased suspects in the San Bernardino shooting were identified as Syed Farook, 28, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, by police chief Jarrod Burguan at a press conference Wednesday night. The two were married and had a six-month-old daughter, according to The New York Times.

Burguan said that Farook worked as an environmental health specialist for San Bernardino County for the last 5 years and was born in the United States.

Farook was at a holiday work event on Wednesday at the Inland Regional Center and left “angry,” Burguan said, before returning with Malik, both dressed in tactical gear and heavily armed with guns and explosives.

The shooting left 14 dead and at least 17 injured at the facility for people with developmental disabilities. Burguan said officials are “reasonably” confident that Farook and Malik were the only attackers.

Follow the LA Times for live updates.

More on the San Bernardino shooting:
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Video From Inside Building at San Bernardino Shooting

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Video From Inside Building at San Bernardino Shooting

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An employee from the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California, shared the video below from inside the building where a mass shooting took place Wednesday morning.

Gabi Flores, a customer service coordinator at the center for people with disabilities, gave KPCC, a Southern California radio station, permission to post the clip, where an officer can be heard leading a group to safety.

“Try to relax,” the officer can be heard saying in the clip. “I’ll take a bullet before you do, that’s for damn sure.”

More on the San Bernardino shooting:
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– The Shooting at Inland Regional Center: A Parent’s Thoughts
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Dad Reads Texts From Daughter in Building During San Bernardino Shooting

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In the midst of Wednesday morning’s mass shooting at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California, The Associated Press shared the video below of a man named Terry Pettit, whose daughter was at the scene. The Inland Regional Center provides services to people with developmental disabilities, and just after 11 a.m. PST Wednesday, three masked gunmen reportedly opened fire in the building’s conference center. At least 14 people are dead and at least 17 are injured, according to the Los Angeles Times.

As Pettit read his daughter’s texts to the AP reporter, he broke down into tears.

More on the San Bernardino shooting:
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