I'm on the Autism Spectrum and Some People Think I'm Weird. Here's Why That's OK.

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kim goodman Some people think I’m weird. Some people pass judgment on me, and others laugh and talk about me. It used to bother me, but now it doesn’t. When someone assumes things about me it shows me their mind is so closed that they are not willing to learn something new. When people talk about me or pass judgment on me it shows me I’m quite interesting to the person because they are taking the time to observe me. My only advice is, before you judge or assume, get to know me enough to ask questions. If a person does take the time to enter my world I will teach them things they never thought of because I have the ability to think outside the box.

There was a time I had a desire to be “normal.” I had people telling me to watch what I did and said in fear of what others might think or say about me, and I had people who criticized me because of my differences and people who compared me to others and pointed out what they thought I wasn’t doing right. After having people question me about why I can’t do things like a “normal” person or why I can’t like things like “normal” people my age, I couldn’t help but think that the term “normal” meant a non-autistic person or a disability or disorder-free person.

 I spent a great deal of my life not knowing how to live. I was confused and didn’t know what to do so I became a follower. I tried to live my life like the majority of society, but I failed miserably because it was hard for me to pretend to be someone I was not. I felt a great deal of sadness, frustration, anger, anxiety, fear and pain. I felt inferior to most people and believed I was a bad person because I was different.

Then I reached a breaking point. 

I realized if I wanted to live a happy and productive life, I had to make changes in my life. First, I had to accept I was different from most people and understand that a lot of people might have a problem with my differences and that is OK. Second, I had to learn I had the power to decide who I let in my life. If someone caused me stress, discomfort and wasn’t supportive of me, it was OK to not allow them in my life or walk away from them. Third, I had to learn how to be strong. I had to stand my ground and not give in when people try to change me into who they wanted me to be or who they thought I should be.

I had to learn who I was as a person and not who society or those around me wanted me to be. When I was diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder, I learned all I could about it so I could better understand myself. For years I wondered why I never developed sexual feelings for males or females. Through research I found out I was androgynous (having both masculine and feminine characteristics). I accepted these things about myself, and now I expect the people who I allow in my life to accept these things about me too.

I don’t always act my age, and at other times I may appear too professional or serious. I have a more masculine appearance, and sometimes people have a problem with this. I’ve had a lot of people who tried to get me to explore my feminine side more. At one point in my life I would allow people to temporarily change me into the feminine person they wanted me to be. I would feel so much discomfort, but I didn’t know how to tell them how miserable I felt. Now if someone tries to change me into who they want me to be, I wouldn’t do it, and if they insist too much I would just walk away or kick them out of my life. Now I feel if a person can’t accept me as I am or respect my decisions and choices, then that person doesn’t have a place in my life.

I have dreams and goals of being an entrepreneur. Some people tell me I can’t succeed at being an entrepreneur because I have a disability and I am healing from years of abuse. Years ago I would have believed this, but now I don’t. 

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My Autistic Son's Biggest Concern When Taking His Medication

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You never know what’s going to bring that massive grin to your face. You know, the one where you can’t stop even when you try, where you think if you don’t stop, your cheeks might squash your eyes closed. The best ones are those that catch you off-guard. That’s exactly what happened to me.

We told Anthony about both his autism and his attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) about two months ago. It was the right time as he’d started to get frustrated with his difficulties and needed to know that these conditions meant he was different, not less, than other people. Medication for his ADHD was not a quick decision. We all, including Anthony, agreed he might be helped if he could concentrate a bit better at school. Today was the first day for Anthony to take his medication, so as he came down the stairs I reminded him about it. And that’s when it happened.

“Remember, we are going to take your medicine this morning.”
“Mom?”
“Yes, honey.” (I’m fairly liberal with terms of endearment in our home.)
“The medicine won’t make my brain like everyone else’s will it? Because then I don’t want it.”

And that’s when the grin happened. I tried my best to answer him through a face that would not stop smiling.

“No sweetie, it’s just a tiny little medicine that might help you concentrate a tiny bit better.”

I was truly amazed by our son. We weren’t sure how he would react to knowing he had autism and ADHD. He’s struggled with some of his other diagnoses like his hypermobility — he just gets annoyed that his loose knees keep “making” him go on his toes when he walks. But this was brilliant.

Our son had not only come to terms with being different, he was in fact, completely happy with it. He didn’t want to not be himself. He was willing to forgo medication that could help him at school if it meant it changed him as a person. Honestly, I can’t contain my joy. Sometimes I feels like society does nothing but point out how kids are different, even if by simply not being able to accommodate them. Anthony seems like he doesn’t feel this or if he does, he might not care.

He likes who he is.

He had his medications with his breakfast and I busied myself making sure the kids ate breakfast and were out the door, but I did it all with a giant grin. As I dropped him at school, I reminded the staff to look out for side effects of his meds. Then, I couldn’t help but tell his teaching assistant about his comment. She grinned too. One of those big grins…you know the kind.

Follow this journey on Rainbows are Too Beautiful 

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The 3 Simple Words to Say When Someone Asks You, ‘What Is Autism?’

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Has anyone ever come up to you and asked you point blank, “What is autism?”

As someone who has made a career in public speaking, I’m often asked by hundreds of people each year who are just being introduced to autism about what autism is. While autism is defined and characterized as a social and communication disorder, when you get to meet people in our community, autism rarely falls into a one-size-fits-all diagnosis.

Being nonverbal till I was 2 and a half and then dealing with communication delays later led everyone to believe I had “classic autism.”

In addition to these delays, I was also officially diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). My other challenges included expressive and receptive language disorder, severe sensory integration dysfunction, auditory processing disorder, twirling, dysgraphia (a handwriting disorder) and overall motor challenges.

My challenges introduced me to an understanding early on in my development about how autism truly is a spectrum disorder. If you’ve met one individual with autism, you’ve met one individual with autism. When I met my first peer who was also on the spectrum, I realized how different we were from each other, especially when it came to our challenges.

That experience, in particular, really struck me. So when I educate our community on what autism is, I start off with these three simple words:

Autism is unique.

It’s very much like a rainbow. It’s full of different colors that stand out, and together they make a beautiful spectrum of light.

Temple Grandin says autism is “different and not less,” and much like that saying, I see these three words as something with a similar meaning.

Whenever I start a conversation with someone new, these will always be the three words I start with.

Regardless of how you start the conversation the next time someone asks you this question, I hope you’ll educate and further promote autism awareness and acceptance.

This post first appeared on KerryMagro.com.

Imagine someone Googling how to help you cope with your (or a loved one’s) diagnosis. Write the article you’d want them to find. If you’d like to participate, please check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines.

Lead photo source: Thinkstock Images

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Movie Theater Kicks Young Boy With Autism Out of 'Finding Dory'

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A movie theater screening “Finding Dory,” a movie highlighting disability and promoting acceptance, was not the most accepting place when it asked a 3-year-old boy with autism spectrum disorder and his mother to leave the theater for being disruptive.

Jessica Matthews took her son, Aiden, to Regal Crossroads in Bellevue, Washington last Tuesday to have his first movie theater experience.

“When the movie started, he got a little restless because it was dark, and so he would switch seats back and forth,” Matthews told Kiro 7. “And then he would roll on the floor during the movie.”

Matthews didn’t think her son’s behavior was an issue until 30 minutes into the movie when the theater’s manager told Matthews people were complaining.

“I could see some people being irritated, but it’s not more than most kids do during movies,” Matthews said. “To hear that people were bothered by him was just like a punch in the gut.”

The manager gave Matthews two options – control her son or leave. Matthews chose to take her son and leave.

“I think that people should know that kids with autism are just that: kids. All kids struggle to sit down and be quiet,” Matthews told Scary Mommy. “It just so happens that autistic children struggle more and need the exposure to learn what’s appropriate and to learn what other typically developing children already understand.”

Related: This Is What Sensory Overload Can Feel Like for People on the Autism Spectrum

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The Impact a Positive Attitude Has Had on My Life on the Autism Spectrum

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One of the greatest lessons I ever learned in college was the ability to lead through, “The Power of a Positive Attitude.” When I was growing up it was always difficult for me to commit to things, always hard for me to get to that next level. A big part of that was based on my attitude. I didn’t know it back then, but I was blind from how my attitude was leading the direction of my life. As a kid, it was always tough for me to focus on what was needed to overcome my obstacles.

College did change me though. It made me understand the need to take my attitude that indeed dramatically changed in high school to another level again. This happened when I started to realize there’s a solution to everything. Indeed, some of these solutions are ever-changing as our society evolves and gains more knowledge, but I came to believe what my mom would always tell me: “There are no problems, just solutions.” This helped me tremendously. Whether it was getting accommodations for classes or even finding a way for an individual with autism, such as myself, to get a masters degree in strategic communication, the solution was there for me to find.

What I hope you take from this is that even though there is a great deal of uncertainty out there involving autism and disabilities, we must continue to push positivity in everything we do. There are answers out there to help our loved ones succeed. Getting down on ourselves will help no one in our pursuits for a better tomorrow. Our community is in desperate need of this. I know this might be harder for some, but I ask that you make an effort to lose yourself in your passions to make a difference for yourself and the lives of others.

Tell yourself, “There are ways to improve my life. There are ways to help my loved ones.” Make these your mantra. We spend so much time saying what we don’t have, what services we can’t find, what diagnoses we can’t get, that we sometimes don’t appreciate what we have today.

Mahatma Gandhi said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” Strive to find the solutions. And if you can, do it with a smile. It can make a world of difference. It did for me.

This post originally appeared on KerryMagro.com.

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College Student Launches Food Truck, Theresa's Twists, to Hire Others With Autism

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Theresa Daniels is starting a business with a twist. Daniels, a college junior on the autism spectrum, is launching a food truck that will be staffed primarily by people with autism.

With assistance from her parents, the company, Theresa’s Twists, will be making hot pretzels and candied pretzels. These “pretzels with a purpose” will then be sold by employees in Daniel’s home state of Tennessee.

“Our goal is to start with our food truck and some day a brick and mortar shop,” Daniels writes on the company’s website.

Theresa's Twists
via Kickstarter.com

“Young adults with autism and Asperger’s often fall through the cracks once they leave high school and college,” Daniel’s says in the Company’s Kickstarter video. “We want to help change that.”

According to the Autism Society, 35 percent of young adults with autism struggle to find employment or postgraduate training after leaving high school.

Theresa’s Twists will provide people with autism with employment experience as well as mentors to help them master business and social interactions.

“We want to demonstrate that persons with Asperger’s are very dedicated, qualified and employable persons,” the website says. “Our vision is to provide a proactive environment for individuals with Asperger’s syndrome a safe place of employment; to use the workplace for socialization training; to give employees a place of employment that fosters relationships; to empower employees.”

According to News Channel 5 Network, the company is launching using family funds and a entrepreneurship award of $12,500 from LaunchTN. Daniels and her family are also running a Kickstarter campaign with the hopes of raising an additional $20,000.

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