What It's Like When You're a Mommy Who's Sick Every Day


“Are you feeling better, Mommy?” This is a question I get asked almost daily by my 4-year-old. I used to just say no, I’m not. She kept asking though, and it’s sweet, but I started to wonder what her meaning of “better” was. So, I asked her, “What would it mean if I felt better?” Her reply hit me, and hit me hard. “It means you can pick me up, then we can go to the park or gym and play.” <Insert me trying not to cry>

What does it look like to be disabled mom? For me it’s…

A sad and confused toddler just wanting Mommy to play at the park or walk behind her play on her motorcycle.

A teen not seeing her mom in the stands at her volleyball, basketball or other sports events.

• A husband getting upset and disappointed because yet again date night was canceled.

• A friend getting sick of asking “How are you feeling?” because they get the same reply each time: “Tired, sick, sore, etc.”

• A parent calling to check up and feeling helpless that they can’t help their daughter feel better.

• Siblings not knowing what to say or how to say they care.

• Me, feeling the loss of hope and seeing the sadness she causes others.

I’m sick every day, all day. I don’t get a day off from being sick, no vacations. My body doesn’t say “OK, so today you will be 100 percent fine, but watch out for tomorrow, tomorrow will suck.” It doesn’t work that way. Some days I will feel better than others, but there is never a day where there is nothing going on — there is always something.

I have always loved makeup, but the reasons have changed over the years. When I was younger, I liked it because of the colors and it made me feel pretty. Now, it seems I like it and wear it like war paint. It covers up my blotches, makes my eyes brighter, and covers the bags of little sleep. It’s a mask, and it can hid how I feel. There are days that sitting up is a challenge and takes most of my energy. So if you see me with makeup, please don’t assume I’m not sick or in pain. I am, I just want to cover some of it up. I just want to look “normal.”

I want to say sorry to my family and friends. And this is what I want to apologize for:

To my youngest: I’m sorry I can’t always be there. When we go out, I have to use my cane, or a wheelchair, so places are limited. I’m sorry that I can’t lift you up and I can’t go play in the park. What I can do is snuggle on the couch or in the bed with you watch TV, or read a book.

To my teenager: I’m sorry I can’t always take you shopping and can’t be at all your games. I can help you with makeup or your hair and listen to how your day went, how many points you scored or what project you have coming up.

To my husband: I’m sorry I can’t always go on date nights, or even a drive. I’m sorry pain and sickness gets in the way of being in the mood. I can talk about your day, rent a movie on demand, and I’m really good at ordering takeout or delivery.

To my friends and family: I’m sorry I’m not the best daughter, sibling, or friend sometimes. I’m sorry I cancel plans all the time, or can’t come see you, making you come to me. I can, however, text, video chat, talk on the phone and make up for it with awesome products I get for review.

Lastly, to strangers I have yet to meet: I’m sorry if I seem impatient at the store. It’s mainly because I don’t feel well enough to be there, so I just want to get in and get out.

So, you may be wondering “Well, what can I do?” Of course every person is different, but I think understanding is something everyone wants across the board. Understand that I want to do things that I used to do, but can’t now and it’s out of my control. There is a saying I heard, and I think it’s so good. If you see your loved one having a bad day say to them (and please mean it, if you say it) “What can I do to help make your day better?”

• Children: Try to stay quiet or offer to pick up, and of course listen, just listen.

• Husband: Cook/pick up dinner and take kids out to the park or a walk. Understand that it may not look like your wife may got anything done that day, but that doesn’t mean she doesn’t care.

• Friends: If possible, ask to take the kids to school (I know, not always possible). Send a text saying, “I know it’s probably not a good pain/med day for you, but I’m here to listen if you need to talk.” A kind word goes a long way.

• Parents: Just keep being the best parents you can, even though it’s hard seeing your kids sick.

• Siblings: Call, text but also don’t be upset if it takes a while to get back.

• Strangers: Please be kind. Don’t stare, don’t laugh or mock, just be kind. I’ll use the word again: understand. Understand that people with disabilities are just like you and have feelings — we just can’t do things that you can do.

And finally, I want to say thank you. Besides my family, I have a few amazing friends I wouldn’t trade for the world. They have seen me on good days and bad, and yet they are still by my side. I couldn’t do it without them. I may be strong willed, but I know my limits, and I wouldn’t be here today if it weren’t for them, my family or a kind word from a stranger now and then.

This post was originally published on Top Notch Material.


Find this story helpful? Share it with someone you care about.


Related to Chronic Illness

The author in the hospital

Answering 'How Are You?' From the Maze of Chronic Diseases

“Hey… how are you, Shannon?” How am I? I don’t think everyone wants the real answer. But here is the honest, scary truth — I’m lost in a maze of doctors who all seem scared to touch me for fear of anaphylaxis or death or that the insurance doesn’t want to pay anymore. It’s hard [...]
Mother and daughter enjoying the view on a lake.

I Have a Disability, Chronic Illness, and Will Make an Awesome Mom One Day

I am disabled. I have medical needs unimaginable to most and I require lots of help medically and practically to live my life as others do. My ill health is complex, fragile and hugely life-impacting. I cannot get definitive answers as to where this will lead, because those answers do not exist. But, I still have what it [...]
Rear view of woman with headscarf sitting on the beach by a rock and looking at the sea

Why I Don’t Want People to Tell Me There's a 'Brighter Side' to My Illness

There is nothing more wonderful than having a supportive and loving family and friend network around you when you battle a chronic illness. I cherish every kind word they said or every wordless gesture that shows how much they care. I have, however, grown sick of the “don’t worry, there is a bigger picture” or “there is a [...]
woman sitting looking and sunset over ocean

7 Lessons for Recovering Your Spirit After a Health Crisis

When you become “chronically ill,” everything changes. You need to change your habits, drop hobbies and get used to this body that is not the same anymore. But you know the biggest repercussion is not in your body. It’s not in your kidneys, in your lungs, or in your liver like the doctors are saying. It’s something more important [...]