What I Really Want for the Holidays as Someone With Depression


The holidays can be taxing for everyone, but I find them particularly hard as someone who struggles with depression. Everyone is running around spreading holiday cheer, while some of us can be struggling to get out of bed in the morning. I’ve compiled a list of things I actually want this holiday session as someone with depression, and I hope others can relate to these as well.

1. Successful med testing

What makes this gift incredibly intriguing is that it can have multiple benefits. No mood swings, changes in appetite, weight fluctuation, etc. You also get a prescription that actually helps you without negative side effects or months of not feeling like yourself.

2. Not having to fake it

It’s really difficult to be merry and bright all the time, especially when you don’t feel like being anything. I’m not saying that being festive is completely off the table, but having to put on a front that’s full of tinsel and bows and pine-scented everything is hard to do for the entire month of December.

3. Holiday gift shopping to not turn manic 

Manic depression manifests itself in many different ways, and one common symptom is excessive spending. When you have to buy presents for family, friends, co-workers, your brother’s girlfriend and the dog, it can be easy to fall into a spending hole that can be masked as getting everyone an extravagant gift or buying tons of presents to donate to charity. While these aren’t necessarily bad things, if you don’t have the money do them, it is a big concern.

4. Loved ones cooperating

During this time of year, you are often encouraged to spend time with those dear to you. But it can be very annoying being constantly nagged to have more “holiday cheer” or being asked “Where’s your Christmas spirit?” It would be so meaningful to just have family and friends saying how happy they are that you are here to be able to celebrate with them. If someone has been suicidal in the past year, being reassured that the people in their life want them around can mean more than any physical gift.

5. Staying in bed

Doing festive activities for an entire month can be a lot, and sometimes you just need a break. Just because you don’t want to participate in your neighbor’s ugly sweater party doesn’t mean you are a Grinch. It just means you’d rather stay home with a warm mug of cocoa and some classic Christmas movies.

6. Fuzzy socks

Fuzzy socks just make everything better!

Image via Thinkstock.

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