3 Things Poker Pros Can Teach Us About Living With a Chronic Illness


Let’s face the facts: Chronic illness robs you of a lot of energy, and it can feel like you’re always playing catch-up. There never seems to be enough moments when you feel well, and the time and energy you do have is spent on all things people tell you to have do to be a good human being. Enough already! I hear you shouting, “Stop the world, I want to get off!” So you have permission to take a moment today to read some good news because I have some for you. Here’s a secret I want to let you in on:

The majority of the people in this world live their lives on auto-pilot. They stay in their comfort zone and rarely move beyond it. Why? Because it’s easier, it’s comfy and it’s safe. They’re not taking an active role in their lives.

The truth is that most people on this planet are as lost, if not more lost, than you! The difference between them and you is your situation has made you acutely aware of the precious nature of every day and every moment. And that gives you something they don’t have. Your obstacles have put you in a better position than most to fully appreciate this life you’ve been gifted. 

When we’re dealt a difficult hand in life, it’s easy to compare our lives with people who have their full health. But life isn’t what we’re given, life is what we make of it. Life is the sum total of our actions and our ability to learn and apply what we learn (or not) for better or worse.

We usually think people who have been dealt the perfect hand have it made. But take it from a half-decent poker player, you can have the best hand at the table, but if you don’t know how to play the game or don’t realize you have a good hand, then you’re not going to play that hand to its full potential.

Watch professional poker players. They know how to use the cards that land. They get to know their situation, they read people, they work out the pro’s and con’s and probabilities, they take chances, they trust their gut and they hone their skills and practice until it becomes second nature.

So what can poker pros teach us about living with the cards we’re dealt that don’t seem so great at times:

1. See more than just your hand.

You don’t get to choose the cards, but you do get to choose what you do with that hand. You can take one look at what you’re dealt and fold, or you can pause for a moment to take in your surroundings, the people around you and assess how strong a position you’re in. Maybe test the waters with a call and see how it plays out or if your luck turns.

In life, you’re more than just the illness you’ve been dealt with. Just like there’s more than just the cards in play at the table, there are people, opportunities, chances and maybe just a little luck. But you’ll never know if you’re never in the game. Play with life a little and take a chance that there might be more for you than just the options you see in front of you right now.

2. Play the long game.

A good player knows when to fold and knows that it’s not about winning every hand. If you’re smart enough to get to heads up — the final two players — the odds are suddenly much more favorable than when there was a table full of opponents. In other words, you don’t have to do everything and you don’t have to do it all at once. Play to win by playing it smart and by choosing your battles one hand at a time. Pick the best hands and fold the opportunities that don’t light you up or make you feel good

3. All you need is a chip and a chair.

You have been given a chip and a chair in this life. It’s seat at the table and a chance to play. And you’ve been given another great advantage: Your life so far has taught you to be smart, observant, patient, and when that hand comes, you’ll know how to play it better than anyone else.

You may feel like the underdog sometimes, but every dog has its day and, my warrior friend, you are still very much in the game.

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