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What a 'Good Day' Looks Like for Someone With Anxiety

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We talk a lot about what makes anxiety hard to live with, and while it’s important to share our struggles, we can’t forget to celebrate our victories, too. Even if “good days” with anxiety seem like “normal days” for someone else, it’s important to hold on to the fact that these good days are possible — and they will come.

To get a sense of what a “good day” looks like, we asked people in our mental health community to share what a good day with anxiety means to them.

Here’s what they said:

1. “A good day is a day when I wake up without shaking. When I actually crave a certain food and enjoy eating. When I am able to do my normal daily routine without crying several times a day because it’s overwhelming, and best of all when I’m able to be present and have positive feelings towards those I most love instead of feeling nothing.” — Hiram M.

2. “A good day for me is being able to immediately go shower without spending hours working up to it. A good day is going to work and not having a panic attack. A good day is being able to communicate with others.” — Rene H.

3. “A good day is when I can answer the phone without feeling nauseous, or when I hear the doorbell and answer it rather than hiding behind the curtains hyperventilating until I’m 100 percent sure the person has gone away. A good day is when the mere thought of leaving the house doesn’t make my heart race. A good day is when I can reach out to friends without feeling that I’m burdening them or making them angry by bothering them. A good day is when I can merely exist even for a few hours without feeling an invisible weight crushing my body or a terrible sense of dread.” — Sarah S.

4. “A good day is one of adventure. Proving to myself that I can cross new social barriers without much incident.” — Alex N.

5. “A good day is when I don’t obsess about everything someone says. I don’t believe that the world hates me. I don’t feel completely alone when the phone doesn’t ring. I don’t tell myself that my friends are too busy to answer my calls for help. On a good day, I can get out of bed and function in a world I perceive to be my enemy.” — Rhonda M.

6. “A good day for me is waking up in a panic only to realize there’s nothing to panic about. Then I proceed to take my medicine that takes me from the panic attack level down to where my nerves are just plain jumpy. A good day for me is one where I’ve only had one or two panic attacks. A good day is one where I can convince myself that I haven’t done anything wrong.” — James T.

7. “A good day is not throwing up several times in the morning while I’m getting dressed/ getting ready to go somewhere. A good day is not feeling nauseous all day, and not taking multiple trips to a bathroom to dry heave or to throw up because I’m scared or because I’m anxious about having to do something that makes me uncomfortable. A good day is me not questioning or over analyzing every action or words said by myself or others. A good day is when I feel like it’s OK to have generalized anxiety disorder and high-functioning anxiety.” — Molly C.

8. “Good days are days during which I don’t constantly feel trapped and overwhelmed. Good days are days during which I can be patient with myself and remind myself that I’m sick — that I can take things at my own pace, and I don’t have to bull my way through things until I’m reduced to a trembling, sobbing mess.” — Amber W.

9. “A good day is not remembering I have anxiety. Not realizing until I get home at the end of the day that I didn’t feel anxious at all. Not having to be aware and vigilant of my mental health for a few hours. Being able to exist without thinking about it. Just living.” — Clara B.

10. “A good day is making it out of bed and into the shower the first time my alarm goes off. It’s showing affection to the people I care about without being clingy. It’s when I can make it through a day of school without contemplating leaving because my mind is too much for me to handle. It’s being able to smile without forcing it, it’s cracking jokes that aren’t detrimental to myself, it’s going the entire day without getting lost in my head. It’s being able to go to bed at night without tossing and turning for hours and without fearing that I’ll wake up sweating and shaking from nightmares.” — Keeli B.

11. “A good day for me is when my phone still has battery at the end of the day because I’ve not been Googling obsessively or playing games to distract my busy brain!” — Kirsty A.

12. “A good day is a day I manage to walk down the street without thinking I am in danger and being able to act freely without the fear of judgment or social difficulties.” — Katie C.

13. “A good day is being able to wake up in the morning and actually get out of bed. When I can go shopping or do other everyday things without panicking. When I can do things without having to mentally prepare for a long time, and when talking to people doesn’t make me cry or shake. And when falling asleep at night is easy instead of terrifying.” — Rosie F.

14. “A good day to me is when I laugh so hard until my stomach hurts, when I feel like nothing or no one can hurt me. When I’m not constantly over-analyzing everything about my day or the what ifs. But the best part is when I can control an in coming panic attack and I can calm myself down before it gets too bad, those are the good days!” — Becky U.

15. “A good day is when I can plan an outing for my child to somewhere I know will be crowded without having an exit plan. Without obsessively checking every bus, train, streetcar or taxi company in the area because ‘what if.’ It’s not having to ask someone else to come with us for fear that I’ll have a panic attack and need someone to help me keep it together. A good day is getting to be a ‘typical’ parent.” — Amanda C.

16. “A good day is when I feel. I can laugh honestly, feel my girlfriend’s love and really feel life.” — Eddie E.

17. “A good day is when I don’t feel my skin crawling because I’m overthinking that I’m ‘missing’ something or feel like I’m alone in a crowded room. When even if I might have a tiny spike of anxiety, I’m able to calm myself down quickly and continue on with my day. Those are the best days.” — Arisa R.

18. “A good day is when I can be myself in public. Or when I can actually order my own food at a restaurant without being self-conscious about what I’m ordering. Or when I can work in a group for class and be able to be a part of that group. A good day is when I can read aloud in class without my cheeks heating up or my heart beating out of my chest or almost burst into tears when I say a word wrong. A good day is when I can laugh and be myself around my friends.” — Isabella S.

19. “For me a good day is waking up and not spending 30 minutes challenging negative thoughts in my head. Not fearful that I don’t have enough time to get ready to go to work. Not feeling overwhelmed while at work or worrying I am going to say or do anything that might get me in trouble.” — Michael Q.

20. “I good day for me is when I can hold a pencil without shaking uncontrollably, and being able to write down notes from my classes without having a panic attack. A good day for me is when I don’t feel like crying every moment because I didn’t understand part of my homework completely. A good day for me is when I’m able to smile at people and say ‘I’m OK’ without lying.” — Nicole S.

21. “A good day for me is a normal day for anybody else. I just feel at peace. I feel loved. I feel calm and it’s finally quiet in my head. It is wonderful to enjoy my friends and family without feeling like I want to shy away in a corner.” — Marissa D.

22. “When my friends are around. Gives me a good distraction.” — Zakari P.

23. “A good day is a day when I have the strength and confidence to stand up for others.” — Greg P.

24. “Being able to be independent and not requiring constant reassurance or validation, either from the person I’m with or via text message, if I’m alone.” — Laura C.

25. “A good day for me is if I’m able to get through a social situation without backing out or having a panic attack. It might seem like a small thing to some, but interacting with others, especially strangers, makes my anxiety go into hyperdrive, so if I’m able to face that I feel really proud of myself.” — Lydia A.

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What I Want the People Who Don't Understand My Anxiety to Know

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I am fighting in a war, every single day. I’m a warrior, but I am encompassed by fear.

My anxiety is 24/7. It doesn’t switch off when the lights go out. It can attack at any moment. Any time, any place, it can corrupt me wherever I am. Each day is different, unpredictable and impulsive. It overpowers my need for constant routine. It has fallen into my lifestyle, planted a bomb and exploded. When the war is over and all that’s left is the aftermath, my mental illness will leave a scar that will always be with me. But perhaps I can conceal it.

I’m quiet. I’m distant. I’m a wallflower.

I am functional, so maybe you don’t see each day is a battle. A mental and physical fight that leaves me exhausted, emotional and needing to be strong when I feel so weak. It’s part of me, and it hurts me every day.

My anxiety tells me to be afraid of everything and prepare myself for the worst. Instead of seeing positives, I seek out all the negative possibilities and I encourage them to grow and grow and grow… until I believe they will happen. Obsessively considering all outcomes is something my mental illness hands me on a silver plate. I am assured the world is against me, I can never achieve the best of my potential. I am never good enough, that’s what I have made myself believe.

But although I may feel like I am shattering into a million pieces at times, I am doing OK. I try to surround myself with people I love and I am attempting to erase negativity from my life.

It may seem confusing when one minute I appear OK, and the next I am struggling with the mental or physical symptoms that target me. Sometimes I don’t know the trigger. I can inhale fear and I become lost on a journey I don’t understand either.

I don’t expect you to fix it.

My anxiety is not a personal attack on you. You aren’t expected to solve it, I just need you by my side. I need to know I am not alone, so when I win, I know you were there to help me in my fight. Positivity and patience can be the greatest aids to my success.

I will always be the same girl. I just bear a few wounds.

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Thinkstock photo via Andesign101.

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12 Things to Remember When You Love Someone With Anxiety

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This piece was written by Kirsten Corley, author of “But Before You Leave

As someone with anxiety, I’m inclined to assume everyone is going to leave. So much so, sometimes I’m the one to ruin a relationship. The truth is I battle something I can’t control, and I get insecure when it comes to relationships. I know it can be difficult and I don’t want to burden you with my irrational thoughts and worries. So instead, I push you away before you get the chance to leave yourself.

Here’s what I’d wish you’d remember about people with anxiety:

1. They’re worth fighting for.

It might be hard sometimes. There might be stupid fights of scenarios I’ve created in my own head. But more than anything, I’m worth fighting for. And if you can fight with me through this, it’ll come back to you 10 folds.

2. The phrase, “It’s OK,” can never be used enough.

It’s two words. Two words that can stop every thought running through my head. And honestly, you can never say it enough.

3. Sometimes you just have to listen.

I’m going to play out these situations in my mind. I’m going to jump from point A to point B and sometimes you’re not even going to know how I got there. The best thing you can do is let me go off on my tangent. Even if there’s no solution or a fear I worry about in the future, the act of listening will help.

4. Don’t tell me, “You’re overreacting.”

To you, it might seem irrational. But to me, whatever I open up to you about, it’s something that actually keeps me up at night. So just take it as best you can.

5. They might not sleep through the night.

Whether it takes me a while to fall asleep or stay asleep, you’ll sometimes be woken up by me at 3 a.m. as I lay there wide awake. Just hold me close and the comfort in your presence might be enough to get me back to sleep.

6. Remember it’s not that they don’t trust you. They’re scared.

You say it’s an ex and in my mind, I jump to cheating. You say it’s a friend and in my mind, it’s someone trying to break us up. It’s not you and your relationship that isn’t trusted, it’s every worse case scenario automatically playing out in my head and I hate myself for it.

7. Answering texts timely does help more than you know.

You’ve probably noticed I answer embarrassingly fast and I know not everyone is like me, but it helps when people understand it. It helps when you say, “I can’t talk now this is why I’ll text you later.” Silence can kill anyone with anxiety. It creates problems in my mind that aren’t even there. It ends in apologies that aren’t even needed. And it adds a layer of stress to my life I wish I could control.

8. Don’t be mad if they send a double text.

You might turn your phone on to four texts. If you can remember it’s not that I’m trying to be annoy. I care. I care too much and I know it makes me look bad.

9. Sometimes they just won’t be up for going out.

I might cancel last minute or freeze in the middle of a night out and just not be able to do it. If I tell you I have to leave, don’t feel a sense of guilt or obligation to go with me. Just know I tried and for whatever reason, I couldn’t handle it.

10. Accept their apologies even if you don’t understand.

Whether it’s a night out gone wrong, a triple text, saying or doing the wrong thing, they are so observant. They will pick up on the slightest shift in you and before you even realize you might be upset, and they will apologize for it.

11. Help when you can but know when you can’t.

I would rather have 10 meltdowns, biting off more than I can chew, than admit I can’t handle something. I always say yes. I’ll never turn anyone away. And in those moments where it seems like I am going to fall apart and break, just hold me. Help me if you can but know I’m inclined to not ask for help. I’m used to dealing with things on their own.

12. Once trust is gained they’ll love you unbelievably hard.

While uncompleted lists, plans getting messed up or texts going answered might overwhelm me, if there’s something I’m good at, it’s love. If there’s something I’m strong in, it’s my ability to show you how much I adore and appreciate you. It might take me a while to trust you but once I do, my capacity to love you will fill you.

This story is brought to you by Thought Catalog and Quote Catalog.

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Thinkstock photo via Vagengeym_Elena

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What's Really Going on When I Pull Away From Your Friendship

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A couple weeks ago I got into a fight with a friend of mine and it was like a switch was flipped in my head. Suddenly, I didn’t want to be around my friends. I felt stuck with no escape. I felt like there was an elephant on my chest and even though I knew everything would be OK, it felt like it wouldn’t. I’m told this is a common symptom of anxiety that presents itself rather intensely in me.

Trying to explain it to my friends was one of the hardest things I have ever had to do. How could I tell them they didn’t do anything wrong, but the thought of being around them scared me to death? The best way I can describe it is my friends became my biggest fear. Talking to them makes my palms all sweaty and my heart starts beating and I feel like I am going to faint. The worst part is I don’t know why.

I can’t imagine what this would be like for the friends around me. One day we are fine, and the next day I can’t talk to them without feeling a panic attack headed my way. I wish I could explain to my friends exactly what happened and why it isn’t their fault, but I can’t do it. I can’t even process it myself.

The only words I can reassure you with are, it isn’t your fault. You didn’t do anything. You have been a wonderful friend and your support means everything. There is nothing you can do or could have done to change what’s happening to me right now.

For someone with anxiety, friendship is the most valuable thing in the world. Believe me when I tell you I wouldn’t ever give your friendship up for no reason. I know it doesn’t make sense to you, but right now its the only thing that makes sense to me.

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text “START” to 741-741.

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The 'Homework Assignment' Helping Me Learn to Love Myself

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Editor’s note: If you live with an eating disorder, the following post could be potentially triggering. You can contact the Crisis Text Line by texting “NEDA” to 741-741.

Do you go to a therapist? I’m sure most of us do, that’s why we gel as a community, right? We are a unified tribe that all need a little help from our friends to get by.  

As someone who struggles with anxiety, my “mental hamster wheel” often turns inward with self-hatred and verbal abuse. My most common default is negative thoughts about my body. I struggle with loving myself. A lot. However, I am trying to learn to love me. All of me. Because I’m tired. I’m tired of beating myself up emotionally for not being “thin.” I am tired of trying to look “normal” and pretty. I’m tired of not loving me regardless of what I look like. I want to love me because my daughter is watching and absorbing, but I also want to love me because life would be much better if I did.

Now we come to the main purpose of this story. How do we learn to love ourselves? I have spent many hours in therapy, and I’ll tell you, I think I might have finally found something that helps. After my therapist gave me a homework assignment that didn’t quite work for me, I revised it. Hers was an “I choose not to weigh today because…” kind of paragraph. I was to read it in the mornings when I would usually weigh and beat myself up for the number on the scale. I learned quickly it just didn’t motivate me. What did wind up motivating me was rephrasing my paragraph and writing a “why I choose to love myself…” paragraph.  

So today, I’m sharing with you something I hope will motivate you to write your own paragraph no matter what you struggle with. This is my paragraph. I hope it inspires you.   

Today I choose to love my body because it has never deserted me. I choose to love my body because it has carried me miles and miles. I choose to love my body because it has made two beautiful children. I choose to love my body because it doesn’t deserve to be hated. I choose to love my body because it houses me. I choose to love my body because it has carried me up the steps of the Eiffel Tower and the Great Wall of China. I choose to love my body because we are partners. I choose to love my body because my kids think it is a safe space. I choose to love my body because my body gives love to others and it deserves it the same in return.   

This is not a permanent fix. I still struggle. I still have to pull out my paragraph, but it’s there. When I am feeling down about my body and I read it, it truly helps. I call it “positivity brainwashing.” May you brainwash yourself with positivity today and every day henceforth. You deserve to love yourself, and I do to.  

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What I Mean When I Say 'I Don't Feel Good' as Someone With Anxiety

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I stare at nothing, zoning out and forgetting about my surroundings. I bite the inside of my mouth without realizing. I hold my stomach in pain out of habit. I only get out of my trance when the people closest to me ask if I am OK. Each time I respond with “I don’t feel good” or “Yeah, I am just not feeling well today.” These statements are very true but the closest people to me have no idea what “I don’t feel good” really means.

I stare into space trying to forget about the anxious thoughts in my head. I may be worrying about a homework assignment or I could be worrying about something that happened five years ago. Most of the time, I have a tornado of thoughts swirling through my head, a mixture of daily worries, self-doubt and fear of failure. My heart races and pounds in my chest as I can’t sort out one thought from another. I bite the inside of my mouth as a nervous tic, thinking about the to-do list I could be working on. My stomach is in knots as I think about the large crowd I have to be in tomorrow or the presentation or test that lies ahead. I’m holding my stomach to try and control the nauseous feeling as my anxiety becomes worse.

My thoughts start to sort out and I start to think of myself as a failure. My head is telling me how I am never going anywhere in life, how I will never find a job after graduation and how I will never be as successful as I want to be. My thoughts continue as they tell me how secretly nobody likes me, how everyone talks about me behind my back. I start to question if I have done something wrong, maybe I screwed up and I am no longer loved. I start to feel alone and hated.

I can’t stop these thoughts and they become too much. My heart races more and my breathing quickens until I feel like I can’t breathe at all. The room feels like a big black hole and I am slowly getting sucked into it, being pulled apart until I can’t feel my body anymore. My boyfriend grabs onto my face and looks in my eyes and keeps saying my name until my breathing finally slows down. I can feel my body again, I can see my surroundings. I am tears and lucky to have someone to hold me.

“I don’t feel good” does mean what it sounds like, but it also means so much more.

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text “START” to 741-741.

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

Thinkstock photo via kotoffei.

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