10 Tips That Just Might Help If You Live With Chronic Illness


After a year of living with a chronic illness, I’ve learned you can never fully predict your day, the challenges that lie ahead and how the loss of control that comes with all of that can be very frustrating (especially for us type A personalities!). However, I have also learned there is a lot you can do to place the odds of a good or better day in your favor.

From peace of mind to symptom minimization, the list that lies ahead aims to provide some tips and strategies that I hope will help you minimize your symptoms, give you back some of that control in your life that is missing and most of all provide some hope that it is possible to make each day better, even if it’s in the littlest of ways. My motto is, any help helps! I hope you find this list, in whole or in part, helpful!

1. Fix what you can. So many symptoms don’t seem fixable. But don’t give up so quickly on this idea! For example, my condition gave me constant back pain. I finally saw a physical therapist and he worked wonders for reducing the pain to a near zero level of pain. This “fix” not only helped my back pain but I’m sleeping better as a result now too.

 

2. Accept what you can no longer do as best you can. Sometimes it requires daily focus – or rather, it requires you to refocus on simply doing the best you can that day. Your abilities will vary day to day but acceptance rather than anger and frustration will serve you so much better, as hard as that is some days.

3. Stubbornness doesn’t work. I am adamant that my limitations won’t affect the core aspects of my life. However, I can be as adamant as I want and the reality is I am not being realistic. The reality is it does – I can’t do what I want, when I want – or even at all sometimes. Back we go to acceptance… or at least working toward it.

4. Refusing to quit does work. I will continue to fight for more each day I can because while I’m still not achieving all I want, that refusal to quit attitude is definitely helping me achieve more than if I didn’t have it.

5. Do not be so hard on yourself. We have chronic illnesses. We can’t keep mentally punishing ourselves for our limitations. For me, I always try to do my best at everything I do. Now though, for some specific things, what I know as my best no longer is possible. I have to accept my new best and let go of my old best. And that is so, so hard! It can be defeating and sad – both feelings that are hard to deal with when you are fighting so hard each and every day to make that day better, more productive or less painful. The best we can do is to try to take these self-defeating thoughts off our plate. Our plate is already full enough. Accept and move on as much as possible in the moment.

6. When you have no energy the littlest of missteps can wreak havoc on your emotions. I can’t tell you how many times yet another spill has almost brought me to tears. Just getting some water can seem challenging enough some days. Then to have to clean up a mess. Yikes! Something as simple as a sippy cup with a tight cap from the dollar store can save you from cleaning up endless spills caused by a new lack of coordination.  Test out some solutions to these types of frustrating issues and you can avoid many such emotional moments.

7. Quietness is key! When you are trying to sleep, and finally get to sleep, you need to be able to stay asleep. Do whatever you can to minimize noises that will wake you. Ear plugs, noise-reducing shades, a fan, a white noise machine… Do whatever it takes to minimize the chance of a disruption to that precious sleep time.

8. A lavender spa mister works like magic. While I love scented candles, I’ve never been a true believer that these scents hold any “power” other than being pleasant. However, I do now. The days my spa mister is freshly supplied with lavender drops result in my best nights of sleep.

9. As tempting as it is, when you finally do venture out for some time with friends, don’t forget to keep your schedule or you may pay some harsh consequences. I used to think, heck, I’m having fun, I rarely get to, so I stay out a bit longer. For most of us with chronic illnesses though, you know this is likely a mistake that could cost you two or so days in bed or worse.

10. Take it one day at a time. Lying on your couch all day can feel like an eternity. Try to remember that even though these moments may be painful, you shouldn’t let them consume you. Don’t “what if…” about what this means for tomorrow, the weekend or even your entire lifetime. It’s just a moment… don’t overindulge in the value of that moment. Better moments are always ahead.

Anyone else have any tips? Please share! As I noted above, any help helps when you have a chronic condition!

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

Thinkstock photo via Dreya Novak.

TOPICS
, Contributor list
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Related to Chronic Illness

25 'Hacks' That Can Make Life With Brain Fog Easier

25 'Hacks' That Can Make Life With Brain Fog Easier

Brain fog is one of the most frustrating symptoms that can accompany chronic illness. When your short-term memory and thought processes are impaired by either illness or medication, it can have a significant impact on your everyday ability to function. You may find yourself missing appointments, forgetting to pay bills or being unable to recall important names, dates [...]

How Taking a Long Mental Health Break Has Helped Me Heal From Chronic Illness

At the start of the year I made a decision to retreat and hide myself away a little from life. I needed to break the cycle of fight and defensiveness I was in and spend some time on recuperation instead. In reality this meant ending a long-term relationship, moving back in with my parents and [...]
woman sitting on a bed wrapped in a blanket and looking out the window

How Chronic Illness Uprooted My Sense of Security

Security. It is something we cling to, a stabilizer that offers us a modicum of peace and comfort in a world that is in continual turmoil. The placement of our security is as vast and varied as the human race, yet the desperate need for it in our lives remains the same. In the frailty and [...]

What I Want Educators to Know About Their Students With Chronic Illness

Growing up, I had always known teachers as the people at school who would advocate for me just as my parents would. For the first half of my educational career, before my illness, I was lucky to have teachers who aided me in my journey towards my goals. In my mind, teachers had always pushed [...]